I FIRST DISCOVERED MATT GREEN IN 2012 WHEN HE BEGAN AN 8,000-MILE WALK; NOW HE’S IN A MOVIE

37-year-old MATT GREEN sets goals for himself. Traveling on his own two legs he walked across the United States from Rockaway Beach NY to Rockaway Beach, Oregon some years ago.

The latest quest for this ex-civil engineer, was to get off his duff, give up his apartment, get rid of most possessions, and walk every block and street in New York City. He now couch-surfs across the boroughs and lives on about $15 a day – no small challenge in the Big Apple.

MATT GREEN is also a better-than-average photographer. He has an eye for New York’s idiosyncrasies, both its beauty and ugliness, curiosities and national landmarks.

“At its core, my walk is an oxymoron: an exhaustive journey through an inexhaustible city. Instead of seeing a million places for just a minute each, I’m going to spend a million minutes exploring just one place.” – MATT GREEN

“The World Before Your Feet” is about Matt Green and his walkathon in New York.  It played recently in TORONTO at Ted Rogers Hot Docs Cinema, and may turn up elsewhere soon.

I came across Matt’s website in March, 2012. Since then he’s added a multitude of new photos, maps, and commentary. Join Matt’s walk (a work in progress) at http://www.imjustwalkin.com

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‘THE WELL’ IS TORONTO’S LARGEST BUILDING SITE – EVER! WORK IS GOING ON DESPITE THE COLD

Through snow, wind, freezing rain, sleet and slush TORONTO’s enormous project, ‘The Well’, is going non-stop on Front Street at Spadina Avenue.

Several development companies and architects are involved in the project, which will contain a 36-storey office tower, six residential buildings, and 432,000 ft² of retail space. Spread over seven and a half acres, the development occupies space vacated by the Globe and Mail and car parks.

PHOTOS by Red Mars, a contributor to UrbanToronto.comhttp://urbantoronto.ca/news/2019/01/site-well-hive-construction-activity-despite-cold

YOUTUBE’S GUY JONES’ TOUR OF MANHATTAN ISLAND IN 1911 HAS SCORED 3,799,094 VIEWS SO FAR

GUY JONES is a videographer who brings history to life by editing old films and making them more watchable. He slows them down to a natural speed and adds sound – making each a totally new viewing experience.

For those familiar with Manhattan, these moving pictures from the Museum of Modern Art collection are riveting to watch. So much has changed – and so much hasn’t changed.

.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aohXOpKtns0

CEO OF CANADA’S LARGEST CRYPTO CURRENCY COMPANY HAS DIED, TAKING PASSWORDS WITH HIM

GERRY COTTEN, 30, was in India opening an orphanage, when he passed away taking the company’s passwords to his grave. Now Quadriga CX, based in HALIFAX, Nova Scotia, is in crisis mode. His wife is unable to find the passwords or keys that would unlock the wallets, worth about $250-million. “Cold wallets” are essentially offline storage systems that protect funds from hacking and theft. They’re locked solid without passwords.

The company has about $375,000 in cash while owing the equivalent of $250-million to about 92,000 users. Mr. Cotten died on December 9th with complications from Crohn’s disease.

CAROLE AND HOWARD TANENBAUM HAVE BEEN COLLECTING PHOTOGRAPHY FOR OVER FORTY YEARS

<Howard and Carole Tanenbaum, photo – Toronto Star>

The TANENBAUMS have put together one of the largest assemblages of photographs and daguerreotypes in Canada – and they’re still collecting. Until April 7/2019 there’s an opportunity to see two-hundred-plus of their images at the Ryerson Image Centre (RIC), 33 Gould Street. Admission is free.

If you take in only one photography exhibit this year, “True to the Eyes” should be on your list.

Occupying two large galleries, the exhibit highlights a range of humanistic pictures, from anonymous vernacular to masterworks by Southworth & Hawes, William Notman, Ernest J. Bellocq, Brassaï, Lisette Model, Diane Arbus, Mary Ellen Mark, Jim Goldberg, Rafael Goldchain, and Edward Burtynsky. Subjects include aspects of family, wealth and poverty, civil rights, nature and Canadian life.

<‘FROM THE CUSTOM HOUSE LOOKING EAST, MONTREAL‘, William Notman, 1878>

<‘NEWSBOYS’, Lewis Hines, 1909>

<COLLECTION OF DEGAUEREOTYPE CASES>

<‘THREE ACROBATS’, Vazquez Brothers Circus, Mexico City, 1997>

<‘SHIPYARD #7’, Edward Burtynsky>

<‘JUMPING MAN’, photographer unidentified>

TORONTO PHOTOGRAPHER, ROSS WINTER, BELIEVES “SOME PICTURES DEMAND TO BE TAKEN”

ROSS WINTER’s photographs can be found in private collections in Toronto, Houston, Montgomery, Vancouver, New York City and Perth. He’s been exhibited at the Propeller Gallery, Art Square Gallery, The Chinese Canadian Cultural Centre, Lennox Contemporary, The Ontario Science Centre, The Artists Project, and the Love Art Fair. As well, he’s been a long-time contributor to ‘torontosavvy’.

With his architect’s eye and attention to detail, Ross’s photographic hallmarks are abstraction, collage, graphic potential, cities and urban evolution.  Some of his work is posted below.

Ross’s new website – http://www.rosswinterphotoworks.com

<‘PENDULUM’, Hong Kong, 2013>

<‘HIDDEN FORBIDDEN’, Beijing, 2009>

<‘DRUMMER’, Austin, Texas>

<‘MARVILLE IN LONDON’, 2015>

<‘THREE VOIDS’, diptych, New York and Buffalo NY>

 

BEFORE DOUG FORD’S GOV’T SENDS IT DOWN THE PLUG HOLE, SOME ‘ONTARIO PLACE’ MEMORIES

ONTARIO PLACE opened in 1971 as TORONTO’s way of importing some of MONTREAL’s Expo67 magic. Pods, bridges, Cinesphere – the first IMAX cinema anywhere, patio restaurants, water slides, swan boats, concerts at the Forum . . . it was nearly all free.

These days things are looking more than a bit rundown. Some locals see demolition in the future of ONTARIO PLACE, and believe there’s a good chance a casino is in the works. After all this is the primest of prime lakefront development property.

DOUG FORD’s recently appointed chair of ONTARIO PLACE is all for demolition. “It’s disgraceful,” he says. “Everything is in complete disrepair, there is nothing that can be saved. It can be rebuilt in any way that Ford wants it to be rebuilt.” (Whatever it is, you can be sure it won’t be free.)

With the Goths at the gate, here’s a look at ONTARIO PLACE in the golden years of 1970 through the 90’s. Photos are from the City of Toronto Archives.

AND WHAT OF THE FUTURE?  We can only wait and see.