THE DOCTORS’ PARKETTE @ BRUNSWICK & COLLEGE STREETS, HONOURS MEDICAL HISTORY

RICHARD LONGLEY in NOW Magazine – “The job is done. The Doctor’s Parkette, dedicated to honour the medical history of HARBORD VILLAGE, whose stars included Dr. Norman Bethune & Dr. Henry Morgentaler (and other prominent doctors who lived in the area, along with its hospitals) transformed this once-squalid corner.”A design competition announced by the Harbord Village Residents’ Association in 2011 to revitalize the site produced 27 entries from eight countries. A panel of professionals judged them and residents voted for their favourites. (In 2018 – 7 years later – the Doctors’ Parkette became reality). <PHOTOS – PMA Lanscape Architects Limited>

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CANADA HAS BECOME A HOTBED OF BASKETBALL AND THE YANKS ARE PAYING ATTENTION

MICHAEL POWELL in the Sunday New York Times, June 8/2019 – “While the N.B.A.’s on-the-ground presence is just a TORONTO thing, basketball is increasingly pan-Canadian. Montreal North, a working-class corner, has produced pros and near pros. British Columbia, too, is formidable . . . the Saskatoon and Calgary basketball scenes are packed with Sudanese and Cameroonians, and are comers.”“The TORONTO Raptors, who will face the Golden State Warriors in Game 5 of the N.B.A. finals on Monday night, are just the visible and celebrated symbol of an impressive north-of-the-border hoops explosion. Hockey remains Canada’s king, but basketball is its restive crown prince.”TORONTO’s mayor, JOHN TORY, has often sported his fashionable RAPTORS-themed jacket, and for years – through thick and thin – has been a stalwart fan. (The loud black jacket is covered with gold Raptors logos.)It’s a great story with lots of photographs and the emphasis is on neighbouring MISSISSAUGA. The NY Times’ website address for ‘Canada Becomes A Basketball Factory’https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/08/sports/basketball/toronto-basketball.html

TORONTO IS KNOWN FOR ITS “INDIVIDUALIZED” HOUSES – HERE ARE TEN CITY-WIDE EXAMPLES OUT OF MANY

<LESLIE & BOND STREETS><LITTLE COTTAGE, BRIGHT STREET, INDIE88 photo><CRAVEN ROAD HOUSE, Greenwood/Coxwell neighbourhood – TORONTO LIFE photo><TORONTO ISLANDS, photo – SANDRO GRANELLA><INTEGRAL HOUSE, Rosedale, PHILIP CASTLETON photo><TINY BUNGALOW – FLICKR><WOOD CAKE HOUSE, Clinton Street><SKINNY HOUSE – photo TORONTO STAR><HALF HOUSE, ST. PATRICK STREET, photo HUFFINTON POST><CASTLE HOME – MAYBOURNE ROAD, photo CTV NEWS>

A DOWNTOWN BREATHING SPACE – THE NEW COLLEGE PARK & BARBARA ANN SCOTT ICE TRAIL

Surrounded on all sides by high rise office buildings and condominiums, the new COLLEGE PARK provides plenty of breathing and sitting-out space for downtown office workers and the thousands who live there.The city’s Forestry and Recreation Division supervised the project which includes planning and design work from RAW Design, the MBTW Group/Watchorn Architect and Project for Public Spaces (PPS).

<PHOTO – BARBARA ANN SCOTT by Fred Chartrand/Canadian Press/2007>

Canada’s 1948 Olympic gold medalist in women’s singles figure skating BARBARA ANN SCOTT (1928-2012) would be pleased to know that TORONTO and developers Canderel Stoneridge have agreed to rebuild both the skating rink and ice trail.You’ll find COLLEGE PARK at 420 Yonge Street in a district that’s undergoing some big changes.  There’s no better place to sit and contemplate.

“TORONTO IS A GREAT CITY RUN BY VILLAGERS” – MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, MARCH/1971

Excerpts from a 1971 MacLeans article, by Douglas Marshall:
—- “It seems only yesterday that TORONTO was just another leafy provincial capital – hardly more than a village, really – full of a lot of dull Protestants preoccupied with money.  Only the people who loved the city, and they were few, realized that what TORONTO lacked in public greatness it made up for in private joys.”“In TORONTO each year about 50 major new buildings go up in the downtown core; some 23,500 apartment units and 8,300 homes are completed . . . and $20 million is spent improving the efficiency of what is already Canada’s finest and longest (4,284 miles) sewer system.” – MacLeans/1971“Expansion has left TORONTO facing crises in transportation, in urban renewal, in the fundamental decision-making machinery of municipal government.” – MacLeans/1971“TORONTO may be big.  It may even be great. But it is fast losing its private joys.” – MacLeans/1971“TORONTO continues to be run mainly by men who still think of it as a village – only grown larger.” – MacLeans/1970’s