COULD DRIVE-IN THEATRES BE A FILL-IN ANSWER TO CINEMAS – DURING THIS PANDEMIC?

In all of Canada there are only 52 drive-in theatres left, down from 250. In the United States there are 336, where there once were 4,000. Surprisngly there are quite a few drive-ins scattered around the Greater TORONTO Area.  For a different kind of movie experience – watching the sun go down and seeing a first-run feature on a giant screen – add a ‘drive-in night out’ to your bucket list.<The Mustang Drive-In, GUELPH>  Today there are drive-ins in Toronto, Hamilton, Barrie, Newmarket, London, Guelph, Oakville, Newmarket and Port Hope. In the not-so-distant past the city by itself had 10 of them, but with urban sprawl, increasing land values, and $80,000 to install one digital projector, most have found the operating costs crippling.<Port Hope Drive-In was built in 1952.  It’s still going strong.  PHOTO – Terry Lagler>  “I can’t make a drive-in look sexy at two in the afternoon. But when the sun goes down, and the kids are on the swings, and you can smell the popcorn and the neon comes alive, it really is quite special.” – BRIAN ALLEN, president of Premier Operating Drive-Ins<The Polson Pier driving range and drive-in, Port Lands, TORONTO>

WHAT’S ON IN TORONTO – JULY/2020 (CLICK ON WEBSITES FOR INFO – SOME IN LOCKDOWN)

LARGE THEATRES
*Berkeley Street Theatre, 26 Berkeley Street, http://www.canadianstage.com
*Bluma Appel Theatre, 27 Front Street East, http://www.canadianstage.com
*CAA (formerly Panasonic) Theatre, 651 Yonge St., http://www.mirvish.com
*Elgin Theatre, 189 Yonge Street, http://www.ticketmaster.ca
*Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay W., http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com/venues/fleckdancetheatre/
*Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts (Opera House), 145 Queen St. W., http://www.coc.ca
*Princess of Wales Theatre, 300 King St. W., http://www.mirvish.com
*Royal Alexandra Theatre, 260 King St. W., http://www.mirvish.com
*Sony Centre for the Performing Arts, 1 Front St. E., http://www.sonycentre.ca
*Streetcar Crow’s Theatre, 345 Carlaw Av., http://www.crowstheatre.com
*St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts, 27 Front St. E., http://www.stlc.com
*Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge St., http://www.tocentre.com
*Winter Garden Theatre, 189 Yonge Street, http://www.ticketmaster.ca
*Young Centre for the Performing Arts, Distillery District, http://www.soulpepper.ca
*Young People’s Theatre, 165 Front Street East, https://tickets.youngpeoplestheatre.ca/TheatreManager/1/onlineMORE THEATRES
*Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley Street, http://www.alumnaetheatre.com
*Bad Dog Comedy Theatre, 875 Bloor Street West, http://www.baddogtheatre.com
*Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, 12 Alexander St., http://www.buddiesinbadtimes.com
*Cahoots Theatre Company, staging diversity, 388 Queen St. E., http://www.cahoots.ca
*Coal Mine Theatre, 1454 Danforth Av., http://www.coalminetheatre.com
*Factory Theatre, 125 Bathurst Street, http://www.factorytheatre.ca
*Hart House Theatre, 7 Hart House Circle, University of Toronto, http://harthouse.ca/hart-house-theatre/
*Lower Ossington Theatre, 100a Ossington Ave., http://www.lowerossingtontheatre.com
*MacMillan Theatre, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto, http://www.music.utoronto.ca
*National Ballet of Canada, Four Seasons Centre, 145 Queen Street West, https://national.ballet.ca
*Red Sandcastle Theatre, 922 Queen St. E., http://www.redsandcastletheatre.com
*Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Lane, Brampton, Ontario, http://www.brampton.ca/sites/rose-theatre/en/Pages/Welcome.aspx
*Second City, sketch comedy theatre that’s launched many careers, 51 Mercer Street, http://www.secondcity.com
*Shaw Festival Theatres, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, https://www.shawfest.com/
*Stratford Festival Theatres, Stratford, Ontario, https://www.stratfordfestival.ca/WhatsOn/ThePlays?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIhqTVruSJ2QIVV7nACh2_pA41EAAYAyAAEgKAZ_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
*Storefront Theatre, 955 Bloor Street West, pushes creative boundaries, an original, http://www.thestorefronttheatre.com
*Tarragon Theatre, 30 Bridgman Ave., http://www.tarragontheatre.com
*Theatre Centre, 1115 Queen St. W., http://www.theatrecentre.org
*Theatre Passe Muraille, 16 Ryerson Avenue, http://www.passemuraille.on.ca
*Toronto Dance Theatre, 80 Winchester St., Cabbagetown, http://www.tdt.org
*Yuk Yuk’s Comedy Club, 224 Richmond St. West, https://www.yukyuks.com/torontoCONCERT HALLS
*Danforth Music Hall, 147 Danforth Av., http://www.thedanforth.com
*George Weston Recital Hall, 5040 Yonge Street, http://www.tocentre.com/theatres/george-weston-recital-hall
*Glenn Gould Studio, CBC Broadcasting Centre, 250 Front St. W., http://www.cbc.ca/glenngould
*Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay West, http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com
*Hugh’s Room, 2261 Dundas St. W., http://www.hughsroom.com
*Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor Street West, http://www.rcmusic.com
*Massey Hall, 178 Victoria Street, http://www.masseyhall.com
*Opera House, 735 Queen St. East, http://theoperahouse.ticketoffices.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI4P_S_OGJ2QIVlLjACh0D0QC9EAAYASAAEgJVj_D_BwE
*Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe Street, http://www.roythomson.com
*Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. W., http://www.trinitystpauls.caCENTRAL CITY CINEMAS
*Carlton, 9 screens, fully licensed, $5 Tuesdays, 20 Carlton Street, https://imaginecinemas.com
*Grand Gerrard Theatre, 1035 Gerrard St. East, independent, film screenings, live music, comedy, performance art, one of Toronto’s oldest cinemas, https://www.blogto.com/arts/2019/04/toronto-grand-gerrard-theatre/
*Hot Docs Ted Rogers, specializing in documentaries and films seldom shown in the multiplex, 506 Bloor Street West, https://www.cinemaclock.com/theatres/hot-docs-ted-rogers-cinema
*Market Square, 80 Front Street East, several screens, https://imaginecinemas.com/cinema/market-square/
*Mount Pleasant, 675 Mount Pleasant Road, big screen, 2nd run features, some European films, etc., https://www.cinemaclock.com/ont/toronto/theatres/mount-pleasant
*Ontario Science Centre Omnimax,770 Don Mills Road, https://www.ontariosciencecentre.ca/imax
*Paradise Cinema, 1006 Bloor Street West, newly restored, independent, an outstanding schedule of films old and new, https://paradiseonbloor.com/
*Regent, 551 Mount Pleasant Road, 2nd run features, big screen, https://www.cinemaclock.com/ont/toronto/theatres/regent
*Revue, 400 Roncesvalles Avenue, neighbourhood cinema, second-run, documentary & foreign features, http://www.revuecinema.ca
*Royal, documentaries, festivals, foreign, second-run features, 608 College Street, http://www.theroyal.to
*Scotiabank Toronto Imax (Cineplex), 259 Richmond Street West, multiplex & IMAX, 14 screens, http://www.imax.com/theatres/scotiabank-toronto-imax
*TIFF Bell Lightbox, 5 screens, movies that don’t play in the multiplex, for times and schedule go to http://www.tiff.net
*Varsity Cinemas (Cineplex), Manulife Centre, 55 Bloor Street West, 12 screens, https://www.cinemaclock.com/theatres/cineplex-varsity-vip
*Yonge-Dundas Cinemas (Cineplex), multiplex & IMAX, 26 screens, 10 Dundas Street East, http://www.imdb.com/showtimes/cinema/CA/ci25232552/CA/M6M1W6
******Complete movie times, Toronto cinemas, reviews, from NOW Magazine, a handy address – http://movies.nowtoronto.com/#/nowplayingMUSEUMS IN & AROUND TORONTO
*Aga Khan Museum, 77 Wynford Drive, http://www.agakhanmuseum.org
*Art Gallery of Hamilton, 123 King St. West, Hamilton, http://www.artgalleryofhamilton.com
*Art Gallery of Mississauga, http://www.artgalleryofmississauga.com
*Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas Street West, http://www.ago.ca
*Bata Shoe Museum, only two in the world, 327 Bloor St. West, http://www.batashoemuseum.ca
*Black Creek Pioneer Village, heritage museum, partly outdoors, 1000 Murray Ross Parkway, http://www.blackcreek.ca
*Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace, Toronto’s castle, http://www.casaloma.ca
*Fort York National Historic Site, 250 Fort York Boulevard, http://www.fortyork.ca
*Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Arts, 111 Queen’s Park, http://www.gardinermuseum.on.ca
*Hockey Hall of Fame, 30 Yonge Street, http://www.hhof.com
*Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, University of Toronto, 7 Hart House Circle, http://www.arts.utoronto.ca/galleries.htm
*Mackenzie House Museum, 82 Bond Street, interprets Victorian life of the 1860’s, 416-302-6915
*McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinburg, http://www.mcmichael.com
*Metropolitan Toronto Police Museum & Discovery Centre, 40 College St., http://www.torontopolice.on.ca/museum
*MZTV Museum of Television, 64 Jefferson Ave., Liberty Village, http://www.mztv.com
*Ontario Science Centre, 770 Don Mills Road, http://www.ontariosciencecentre.ca
*Power Plant, Harbourfront Centre, 231 Queens Quay West, free, http://www.thepowerplant.org
*Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada Museum & Archives, https://www.qormuseum.org
*Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queens Park, http://www.rom.on.ca
*Ryerson Image Centre (RIC), 33 Gould Street, large photography gallery, free admission, http://www.ryersonimagecentre.ca
*Spadina House Museum and gardens, 235 Spadina Rd., 416-392-6910, https://www.toronto.ca/explore-enjoy/history-art-culture/museums/spadina-museum/
*Textile Museum of Canada, 55 Centre Street, http://www.textilemuseum.ca
*Varley Art Gallery of Markham, 216 Main Street, Markham, http://www.varleygallery.caCITY CENTRE ART GALLERIES
*A Space, established contemporary, 401 Richmond St. West, http://www.aspacegallery.org
*Barbara Edwards Contemporary, 1069 Bathurst Street, http://www.becontemporary.com
*Bay of Spirits, 156 Front St. West, First Nations art, http://www.bayofspirits.com
*Canadian Sculpture Centre, 500 Church Street, http://www.cansculpt.org
*Christopher Cutts, 21 Morrow Avenue, http://www.cuttsgallery.com
*Clint Roenisch, 190 St. Helens Avenue, contemporary, avant-garde, http://www.clintroenisch.com
*Corkin Gallery, 7 Tank House Lane, Distillery District, http://www.corkingallery.com
*Daniel Faria, contemporary, converted warehouse, 188 St. Helens Avenue, http://www.danielfariagallery.com
*Diaz Contemporary, 100 Niagara Street, http://www.diazcontemporary.ca
*Koffler Gallery, Artscape Youngplace, 180 Shaw Street, http://www.kofflerarts.org
*Mercer Union, contemporary art, 1286 Bloor St. West, http://www.mercerunion.org
*Mira Godard, 22 Hazelton Avenue, long-established, Canadian & international artists, http://www.godardgallery.com
*Olga Korper, 17 Morrow Avenue, long-established, http://www.olgakorpergallery.com
*Propeller Centre for the Visual Arts, 30 Abell Street, founded in 1996, http://www.propellerctr.com
*Sandra Ainsley, 100 Sunrise Avenue #150, leading dealer in contemporary glass, http://www.sandraainsleygallery.com
*Stephen Bulger, 1356 Dundas St. West, long-established photography gallery, http://www.bulgergallery.com
*Thompson Landry Gallery, 32 Distillery Lane, Distillery District, specializes in Quebec art, both contemporary & the masters, http://www.thompsonlandry.comLGBTQ COMMUNITY INFO
*(ArQuives), formerly the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives, 2nd largest in the world, 34 Isabella Street, http://www.clga.ca
*Legit, 2nd Thursday monthly, immigration legal counsel, 519 Centre, 519 Church Street, http://www.legit.ca
*Metropolitan Community Church (MCC), 115 Simpson Avenue, just above Gerrard St. East, http://www.mcctoronto.com
*Out and Out, LGBTQ outdoors club, http://www.outandout.ca
*Pink Pages, gay, lesbian, trans, bi, leather, queer directory, http://www.thepinkpagesdirectory.com
*ProudFM 103.9, Toronto’s LGBTQ radio station, http://www.proudfm.com
*Rainbow Railroad, a charity which helps individuals in countries where being LGBTQ invites violence, imprisonment or even death, http://www.rainbowrailroad.ca
*Righteously Outrageous Twirling Corps, http://www.rotctoronto.com
*Xtra magazine, gay news from Toronto, Vancouver & Ottawa, http://www.xtra.ca/toronto.asp<THE POLITICS OF A PIECE OF CLOTH – are anti-maskers the new anti-vaxxers?, A pedestrian walks past a Toronto mask store, National Post, July 8/2020><‘COME FROM AWAY 2, THE SEQUEL’, “In this version they round up all the Come-From-Aways and force them into quarantine.”, editorial cartoon by MICHAEL DE ADDER, The Herald, Halifax, Nova Scotia, July 8/2020><From Global News, Monday July 6 – ONTARIO reported 154 new cases of the novel coronavirus on Monday, bringing the provincial total to 35,948. The death toll in the province remains at 2,672, as no new deaths were reported. The last time Ontario reported zero new deaths was on March 31.><KANYE WEST is running for President of the USA, “Actually there is another level . . . “, editorial cartoon by DAVID PARKINS, Globe and Mail, July 7/2020><DO YOUR PART – SIX FEET APART, it’s so easy, from the City of Toronto>

FIRST REPORTED HERE ON FEBRUARY 22/2019, U OF T’S PLAN FOR ‘GATEWAY’ JUST MIGHT HAPPEN – UH, OH!

February 22, 2019 – The University of TORONTO plans a ‘gateway’ addition to Downtown’s Cultural Corridor. It’s under consideration by U of T’s governance, and could replace the former McLaughlin Planetarium, closed in 1995.The architects are Diller Scofidio + Renfro, who were behind New York City’s High Line & the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston.The project will be home to the School of Cities, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, the Institute of Islamic Studies, the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies and the Archaeology Centre. It will also provide facilities for the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Music.A recital hall with a large window will look out on the Toronto skyline. Above the hall – there’ll be a 400-seat event space with similar skyline views. A café will be opened on the ground floor and the designers will include a multi-storey atrium leading up to the recital hall.  <Renderings by bloomimages, courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro>OBJECTIONS are piling up, now that development is a real possibility. One of them comes from Ross Winter, B.Arch, M.Arch, MCP – “The Robarts Library (aka ‘Fort Book’) was a notable example of an inappropriate building thrust upon the community by the University of Toronto – inappropriate in form, scale, and materials.  Efforts are only now being made to humanize or better integrate it with its surroundings . . . “This proposal is fronted by Queen’s Park and backed by Philosopher’s Walk, meaning it will stand out like a sore thumb and not be absorbed into adjacent streetscapes.    The design here is overwrought and the site overbuilt. I urge the decision makers, at all levels, to reject the proposal.”

THERE’S STILL REAL MONEY IN TORONTO REAL ESTATE. INTEGRAL HOUSE SELLS FOR $18,000,000.

One of the most famous houses in TORONTO and North America has just sold for $18-million, along with a $13-million home in Forest Hill, and a $9-million condominium in Yorkville. In this pandemic market, these would seem to be all positive signs. Integral House was commissioned by the late mathematician and musician JAMES STEWART. Five storeys tall, it was finished in 2009, built into the side of a Rosedale ravine. It cost around $24-30-million to build, plus an additional $5.4-million for the original home which was torn down. GLENN LOWRY, director of New York’s Museum of Modern Art, calls the house “one of the most important private houses built in North America.”  The 18,000-square-foot curvaceous home has 5 floors, a concert space, a stairwell ensconced in handblown blue glass, and heated limestone floors. It took six years to build. The concert space seats 150. Small theatre groups, music festivals, dance companies and fashion designers have all used the house for fundraisers and/or concerts.  JAMES STEWART passed away on Wednesday, December 3/2014 from a rare form of cancer. “My books and my house are my twin legacies. If I hadn’t commissioned the house, I’m not sure what I would have spent the money on,” he once said.  <INTERIOR PHOTOS by James Dow, Edmonton, Alberta>

WE MADE THE LIST – CANADA IS ON THE PRELIMINARY LIST FOR NON-ESSENTIAL TRAVEL TO EUROPE

From The Georgia Straight newspaper in Vancouver – “From today, Wednesday, July 1st, Canadians will be allowed to go on European vacations. The European Union is expected to approve business and leisure travel from 14 countries, excluding the United States.“On the preliminary list – Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, and Uruguay. The United States, Russia, Brazil & India did not make the EU list.”  The four of them had the most confirmed cases of COVID-19.>

THE NORWAY MAPLE VERSUS THE SUGAR MAPLE – THERE’S A DIFFERENCE

Little did we know when a Norway Maple seedling began to grow into a gigantic tree. It’s a beauty, but has been hollowed out three times at considerable cost. We also have two more Norways in the front of our house. They were planted by the city, and have also been cut back. I spend half the summer sweeping up seedlings.North America’s Sugar Maple is another story.  It has pride of place on Canada’s bank notes, and the Canadian flag. The Sugar Maple has three wide lobes (or main points), each with a few irregular wavy teeth, plus two one-point lobes near the stem. The Norway Maple’s leaves have seven lobes.<PHOTOS ABOVE – Canadian Military Family Magazine>