TORONTO’S PRIDE BACK IN THE 1950’S WAS THE YONGE STREET SUBWAY – CANADA’S 1ST UNDERGROUND

<AN ORIGINAL Yonge Street Subway sign>

WHY A SUBWAY? Rush hour traffic on Yonge Street, near College, November 18, 1941

SUBWAY STATION exterior as planned, 1921-46

EGLINTON STATION as planned, 1921-46

KING STATION as planned, 1921-46

TANGLE of public utility conduits and pipes, October 14, 1949 – because of the steel shortage caused by the Korean War (1950-53) most of the bridges were made from reinforced concrete. Even enforcing steel rods for the concrete were scarce. Rather than using Canadian suppliers the TTC was forced to buy more expensive steel from the United States & Britain.

EXCAVATION for streetcar entrance on Bloor Street, east of Yonge, June 25, 1951

DAVISVILLE STATION looking south, November 24, 1953

LAST STREETCAR ON YONGE STREET, on the afternoon the subway opened, March 30, 1954

LINEUP TO RIDE on the subway, opening day, March 30, 1954 – the public had to pay the fare, 10 cents cash, or three tickets or tokens for a quarter. Over 200,000 people rode the subway on that day.

<PHOTOS – Canada Pictures Limited & City of TORONTO Archives>

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