TORONTO FOUNDATION’S ‘VITAL SIGNS REPORT/2018’ REVEALS INEQUITY FOR THE FIRST TIME

For the first time in its history, the report uses an inequity lens and paints a clear picture that quality of life in TORONTO varies drastically depending on neighbourhood, income, race, immigration status, gender, sexual identity, and age.

TORONTO is a thriving global centre, “though the overall story is one of success, more and more we’re becoming a city of islands,” says Sharon Avery, President & CEO, Toronto Foundation. “We now have the definitive case for support for a better and more resilient city.”

Who we are as a city . . .
Population has grown to more than 2.7-million, up 4.5% between 2001 & 2016
Middle class income range is between $24,000 & $42,000
20% of the population lives on low income
For the first time there are more seniors than children
60% of downtowners have access to the arts; in suburban Scarborough 37%

Overall 25% of the city has tree cover; Rosedale-Moore Park 62%; some neighbourhoods 7%
50% of us drive; averaging a 29 minute commute
37% take transit & 30% of those spend more than an hour getting to work
73% of high-income earners report good or excellent health
48% of low-income earners report the same
50% of renters spend +30% of their income on housing; 27% of homeowners do the same

Over one-in-four children are living below the poverty line
Nearly 50% of all newcomer children are living in poverty
15% of public school children taking applied courses don’t graduate

2,258 reported sexual assaults in 2016; 30% increase since 2010

TORONTO FOUNDATIONS’ “VITAL SIGNS REPORT” EXAMINES THE CITY’S HEARTBEAT – IT’S TICKING

The fifteenth annual TORONTO report card is out. We can always do better but “by many measures it appears our city is doing quite well,” says Sharon Avery, President & CEO of the Toronto Foundation.

 Environment: Air quality has improved. Greenhouse gas emissions have declined 24% since 1990. We have almost double the rate of greenhouse gas emissions of London, a third more than Amsterdam but half the rate of Los Angeles.  Gap Between Rich and Poor: Hunger is shifting from downtown to the inner suburbs where food bank visits have gone up 48% since 2008. TORONTO is the child poverty capital amongst Canada’s large cities, with rates consistently between 27% and 32% since 1997.

TORONTO ranks as the best place to live among 50 global cities; first among 35 global cities on youth opportunities; 5th among 24 global metropolitan areas on prosperity.

UOFTLearning: In 2015, 59% of the Toronto Region’s population had a post-secondary education, up from 55% in 2010, and higher than Melbourne, Boston, London, Amsterdam and Los Angeles.

Two GO Trains at Union StationGetting Around: Torontonians take four times more public transit trips per capita than people who live in Los Angeles but less than half as many as residents in London.  Work: The overall unemployment rate dropped to 7.7% in 2015 from 9.5% in 2014.

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