CAROLE AND HOWARD TANENBAUM HAVE BEEN COLLECTING PHOTOGRAPHY FOR OVER FORTY YEARS

<Howard and Carole Tanenbaum, photo – Toronto Star>

The TANENBAUMS have put together one of the largest assemblages of photographs and daguerreotypes in Canada – and they’re still collecting. Until April 7/2019 there’s an opportunity to see two-hundred-plus of their images at the Ryerson Image Centre (RIC), 33 Gould Street. Admission is free.

If you take in only one photography exhibit this year, “True to the Eyes” should be on your list.

Occupying two large galleries, the exhibit highlights a range of humanistic pictures, from anonymous vernacular to masterworks by Southworth & Hawes, William Notman, Ernest J. Bellocq, Brassaï, Lisette Model, Diane Arbus, Mary Ellen Mark, Jim Goldberg, Rafael Goldchain, and Edward Burtynsky. Subjects include aspects of family, wealth and poverty, civil rights, nature and Canadian life.

<‘FROM THE CUSTOM HOUSE LOOKING EAST, MONTREAL‘, William Notman, 1878>

<‘NEWSBOYS’, Lewis Hines, 1909>

<COLLECTION OF DEGAUEREOTYPE CASES>

<‘THREE ACROBATS’, Vazquez Brothers Circus, Mexico City, 1997>

<‘SHIPYARD #7’, Edward Burtynsky>

<‘JUMPING MAN’, photographer unidentified>

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TORONTO PHOTOGRAPHER, ROSS WINTER, BELIEVES “SOME PICTURES DEMAND TO BE TAKEN”

ROSS WINTER’s photographs can be found in private collections in Toronto, Houston, Montgomery, Vancouver, New York City and Perth. He’s been exhibited at the Propeller Gallery, Art Square Gallery, The Chinese Canadian Cultural Centre, Lennox Contemporary, The Ontario Science Centre, The Artists Project, and the Love Art Fair. As well, he’s been a long-time contributor to ‘torontosavvy’.

With his architect’s eye and attention to detail, Ross’s photographic hallmarks are abstraction, collage, graphic potential, cities and urban evolution.  Some of his work is posted below.

Ross’s new website – http://www.rosswinterphotoworks.com

<‘PENDULUM’, Hong Kong, 2013>

<‘HIDDEN FORBIDDEN’, Beijing, 2009>

<‘DRUMMER’, Austin, Texas>

<‘MARVILLE IN LONDON’, 2015>

<‘THREE VOIDS’, diptych, New York and Buffalo NY>

 

BEFORE DOUG FORD’S GOV’T SENDS IT DOWN THE PLUG HOLE, SOME ‘ONTARIO PLACE’ MEMORIES

ONTARIO PLACE opened in 1971 as TORONTO’s way of importing some of MONTREAL’s Expo67 magic. Pods, bridges, Cinesphere – the first IMAX cinema anywhere, patio restaurants, water slides, swan boats, concerts at the Forum . . . it was nearly all free.

These days things are looking more than a bit rundown. Some locals see demolition in the future of ONTARIO PLACE, and believe there’s a good chance a casino is in the works. After all this is the primest of prime lakefront development property.

DOUG FORD’s recently appointed chair of ONTARIO PLACE is all for demolition. “It’s disgraceful,” he says. “Everything is in complete disrepair, there is nothing that can be saved. It can be rebuilt in any way that Ford wants it to be rebuilt.” (Whatever it is, you can be sure it won’t be free.)

With the Goths at the gate, here’s a look at ONTARIO PLACE in the golden years of 1970 through the 90’s. Photos are from the City of Toronto Archives.

AND WHAT OF THE FUTURE?  We can only wait and see.

TORONTO IS INTERESTED IN BUYING THE HEARN GENERATING STATION FROM A PRIVATE DEVELOPER

The Hearn power station is a big hunk of real estate – a landmark building – near the waterfront. Since de-accession it’s not been sitting idly by, having been used by Studios of America, the present owner, as a film location since March/2002. The Luminato Festival had a successful run in the Hearn, and it’s also been an occasional concert venue.

City councillor PAULA FLETCHER sees value in the Hearn site as a park, and believes the building itself could be saved and adapted for public use along with movie-making.

“It’s one of the most important buildings on the TORONTO waterfront,” she said in an interview, after putting forward a motion to “initiate negotiations on an expedited basis.”

Mayor JOHN TORY agreed, seconding the motion. The idea was passed by city council 20-2. In 2017 Ms. Fletcher worked hard to save TORONTO Island’s rare antique carousel, and she succeeded.

Maybe Paula can land the Hearn.

CLAUDE CORMIER IS THE MAN BEHIND BERCZY PARK’S REDESIGN & MUCH-LOVED DOG FOUNTAIN

He’s one of Canada’s best-known landscape architects, and his work can be found across Ontario, Quebec, and recently Chicago and Houston. A graduate of the University of TORONTO, Guelph and Harvard universities, Claude Cormier now has 50 different projects under way, including another TORONTO creation featuring 20 cast-iron cats. It will be part of a massive redevelopment on Front Street West at Spadina Avenue called The Well.

<PHOTO ABOVE> Smiley, is named for a blind golden retriever that worked in the St. John’s Ambulance therapy dog program in TORONTO.

‘The Secret to a Great Urban Space’ is a fascinating story by JASON McBRIDE <@jasonmcbride68>; photos by JAIME HOGGE at http://www.jaimehogge.com in the University of Toronto Magazine. It’s well worth taking the time to read about this Canadian landscape architect’s methods and philosophy.

As for the dog fountain – “We did our research and found dogs everywhere in art history,” Cormier says. “It goes back 5,000 years!”

You’ll find the complete story here –
https://magazine.utoronto.ca/people/alumni-donors/the-secret-to-great-urban-space-claude-cormier-landscape-architecture/