FYI – FOR YOUR INFORMATION – STATS ON CASA LOMA, TORONTO’S FAMOUS CASTLE

Built – 1911-1914
 . . . Cost$3.5-million . . . 
98 rooms
 . . . 5 acres of gardens
 . . . designed by E. J. Lennox who also did Old City Hall
 . . . 30 bathrooms
 . . . 25 fireplaces
 . . . 22,400 sq. foot stables
 . . . 3 bowling alleys
 . .  . a shooting gallery
. . . .  . wine cellar holding 1,700 bottles.

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BEATEN UP BY DOUG FORD’S “PROGRESSIVE” CONSERVATIVES, TORONTO GOES FOR THE LIBERALS

Canada’s largest city is leaning towards Prime Minister JUSTIN TRUDEAU and his Liberal Party in the October 21st federal election.According to FORUM RESEARCH in a new poll, 46% of decided voters are onside with Trudeau’s team. The federal Conservatives rate 26%, the NDP 12% and the Green Party 10%“The Liberals are once again showing a dominant lead over their political rivals in Fortress TORONTO,” says Lorne Bozinoff, president of Forum Research. “If the Greens continue to rise in the city, potentially taking support away from the NDP, (could) consequently make it harder for the Conservatives to (vote split).”

THERE’S A PEACEFUL REFUGE FOR RETIRED DONKEYS AND IT’S NOT VERY FAR FROM TORONTO

The hard workers of the equine world are too often taken for granted, treated inhumanely, and considered disposable as they age. Since 1992, the Donkey Sanctuary of Canada, a short drive west of TORONTO, has been a refuge for donkeys, mules and hinnies (offspring of a horse stallion and a jenny donkey) who’ve been abandoned, abused or put up for adoption. Sixty-one of them live in peace at the Sanctuary, and another 40 are in care at foster farms.<PHOTO ABOVE – Daily Hive>The Sanctuary’s charter grants all of the animals – the right of life regardless of age or condition; a dignified and peaceful death; freedom from hunger and thirst; freedom from discomfort and pain, fear and distress.To learn more about the Donkey Sanctuary of Canada, hours of operation, education, programs and tours, check their website – http://www.thedonkeysanctuary.caHOW TO GET THERE – From TORONTO take Highway 401 westbound, exit #295, Highway 6 North. Go to the second road, Puslinch Concession 4, turn left and proceed to #6981.

NEAR TORONTO’S BORDER YOU’LL FIND A FULL-SIZED OPERATING ELECTRIC RAILWAY & MUSEUM

The Halton County Radial Railway (HCRR) in MILTON is a non-profit, educational organization, and Ontario’s first and largest electric railway museum. Founded in 1972, its mission is to collect, preserve, restore, operate and show electric railway trains, streetcars and buses – many of which are retired from the streets of TORONTO.<PHOTO by Ted Wickson – the first two streetcars acquired in 1954; #1326 on the  left was built in 1910 and was the last wooden streetcar retired by TORONTO Transit; #55 on the right was built in 1915.><#327 on loan to TORONTO Transit for the TTC’s 80th birthday celebration, is shown at the corner of Bay and Dundas Streets.  Photo by Ted Wickson.  It’s also part of the Halton Collection><Self-propelled welding car, believed to be the only surviving ERICO bonder, Lake Erie and Northern Railway><Rail grinding car from TORONTO Transit, acquired in 2002; photo by Alan Gryfe><Recently acquired TTC replica of a horse-drawn bus, built in 1930, used in parades and at the CNE; photo – Transit Historian Trevor>Getting there from TORONTO – Highway 401 westbound, exit #312 Guelph Line. Travel north until you reach the museum on the east side of the road. From the Queen Elizabeth Way, exits #102 and drive north for 40 kilometres. Opening hours in JULY & AUGUST – 11 am to 4:30 pm; weekends and holidays 10 am to 5 pm. Website – https://hcry.org/ 

SHEA’S HIPPODROME AT QUEEN & BAY WAS ONCE CANADA’S LARGEST THEATRE – IT’S GONE FOR GOOD

SHEA’S HIPPODROME, opened on April 27, 1914 on what is now Nathan Phillips Square. It was the largest theatre in Canada, with over 3,000 seats. Silent movies were on the bill, along with a 24-piece orchestra.In 1926 a magnificent $50,000 Wurlitzer organ was installed. It would rise from the lowest part of the orchestra pit to the stage. The theatre closed on December 27, 1957 to make way for a new city hall. The organ was re-installed in Maple Leaf Gardens.<SHEA’S HIPPODROME with a sign promoting Elvis Presley’s new movie ‘LOVE ME TENDER’.  The film opened in November, 1956.>  ABOVE PHOTOS – City of Toronto Archive; Toronto Public Library & Historic Toronto.

THE ELGIN & WINTER GARDEN THEATRES ARE OVER 100 YEARS OLD & YOU CAN VISIT

One sits on top of the other.  On the bottom – the resplendent ELGIN, and on top – the WINTER GARDEN, with its pastel lamps and leafy bowers.  These are the last remaining double-decker Edwardian-era theatres in the world. 189 Yonge Street, above Queen.<PHOTOS ABOVE – The Elgin><PHOTO ABOVE – The Winter Garden>  This National Historic Site offers year-round tours – Thursdays at 5pm & Saturdays at 11am.  Adults $12; students and seniors $10. Cash only. No reservations required. Tours include samples from the vaudeville scenery collection, the Winter Garden’s original Simplex Silent Film Projector and a vaudeville-era dressing room.  Ontario Heritage Trust website – http://www.heritagetrust.on.ca

LARGEST COLLECTION OF CARIBBEAN PHOTOGRAPHY – 3,500 IMAGES – ACQUIRED BY TORONTO’S A.G.O.

<J.W. Cleary, Coconut Palms, Kingston Harbour, c. 1895>  NEW YORK’s Patrick Montgomery assembled over ten years a huge collection of historical photos from the Caribbean.<Valentine & Sons, A Boat on Kingston Harbour (variation), 1891>  Montgomery says “I was surprised how few (local historical societies) had photo collections…. So I started poking around and talking to dealers, and it turns out they did exist, but not in the Caribbean. The climate and economy [largely] didn’t support that kind of archive.”<Unknown photographer, Glendairy Prison Officials, Barbados, 1909> Thanks to $300,000 in support mainly from TORONTO’s Caribbean and Black community donors, the unique collection is now in the archives of the Art Gallery of Ontario.<Felix Morin, Coolie Woman, Trinidad, c. 1890><Felix Morin, Bananas, Trinidad, c. 1890>  The collection is distinctive in its reach, covering no fewer than 34 countries from 1840 through to 1940. (Canadian Art Magazine, June/2019)