THE VIRUS IS FIGHTING US, BUT ONTARIO IS A CHAMP WHEN IT COMES TO NEW EMPLOYMENT

Of course this could change at any time, but the latest in Canada’s national employment numbers have risen in seven-out-of-ten provinces. Ontario is at the top of the heap, climbing up by 182,000 jobs – an increase of 2.5%. Toronto city and area contributed 64,000 jobs out of the above numbers. Alberta saw an increase of 37,100 while Newfoundland and Labrador rose by 13,400 (6.5%).  Saturday’s Globe and Mail, April 10/2021

TORONTO’S EDWARD BURTYNSKY SHOWS US EARTH’S INDUSTRIALIZATION & EXTRACTION ON A GRAND SCALE

ANTHROPOCENE is a collaboration among award-winning photographer Edward Burtynsky & filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier. <IMAGE ABOVE – Kevin Walsh/Earth Magazine.org>  The images make it clear what humankind has been up to for decades. They’re a wakeup call to the destruction caused by our species’ dominance, thus far anyway.<COAL MINE #1, North Rhine, Westphalia, GERMANY, 2015, © Edward Burtynsky, Flowers Gallery, London/Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto>. “I have always been concerned with showing how we affect the Earth in a big way. To this end, I seek out and photograph large-scale systems that leave lasting marks.” – from ‘Life in the Anthropocene’ by Edward Burtynsky.<Elephant Tusk Burn, Nairobi National Park, Kenya, film still, Anthropocene Films Inc. © 2018>. “How to convey, despite our brevity as a species, the magnitude of our impact? Anthropocene in a scientific and geological sense means that we are now everywhere, all the time, and even in the rocks—those dense, mysterious receptacles of the planet’s history.” – from ‘Our Embedded Signal’ by Jennifer Baichwal.<Dandora Landfill #3, Plastics Recycling, Nairobi, Kenya 2016. © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto>. “It’s hard not to marvel at the engineering ingenuity of the massive industrial sites we filmed, and equally hard to ignore the devastation they represent.” – from the essay ‘Evidence’ by Nicholas de Pencier.<Uralkali Potash Mine #2, Berezniki, RUSSIA, 2017, © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy of Flowers Gallery, London/ Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto><Carrara Marble Quarries, Cava di Canalgrande #2, Carrara, Italy, 2016. Mural, © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy of the artist and Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto >The Art Gallery of Ontario-produced catalogue, Anthropocene, may still be available at shopAGO for $29.95; along with the 224-page Anthropocene art book published by Steidl.

TORONTO IS STILL IN PARTIAL LOCKDOWN, BUT WE CAN SALUTE THE IRISH ON MARCH 17TH

In September/2017 Ross and I were in The Republic of Ireland and had plans to visit Northern Ireland when the skies opened up and we sampled an Irish deluge. We’ll go up north next time. My day was made when the tourism lady asked my name. When she heard my last name, Moore, she said “you’re one of us!” with a jolly good laugh. We went off to explore the capital and there was plenty there to explore.You can’t miss the Spire of Dublin, or the Monument of Light. Either one, it’s made of stainless steel, 121 meters tall, located on the site of the former Nelson’s Pillar on O’Connell Street in the heart of the city.Oscar Wilde’s childhood home, now restored and occupied by the American College DublinThere’s so much to do and see in Dublin, that once the pandemic ends, we’ll both be on our way there again.Happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

THE NEW YORK TIMES IS PAYING ATTENTION TO THE SOARING CANADIAN HOUSING MARKET

<Aerial view of Toronto City with residential buildings & houses.>   Canada is talking again about whether most of the country is in a soon-to-burst real estate bubble. In Vancouver last month, the benchmark price for detached homes rose by 13.7% compared with a year earlier reaching $1.6-million Canadian dollars. In the Toronto area the average selling price for detached homes rose 23.1% over the same time period, 2020. And a composite price that includes all kinds of housing topped $1-million dollars.  A sellers’ market prevails in many parts of the country, even at a time of economic distress for many. I was surprised to learn that bidding wars, something I associated with Toronto and Vancouver, were now common in my hometown, Windsor, Ontario, for sales of even relatively modest houses. . . . . In my Ottawa neighborhood, a city that posted a record number of house sales last month, little time elapses before “for sale” signs are plastered with “sold” stickers.   Story by Ean Austen, March 5/2021

<Aerial view of Toronto City with residential buildings and houses>

TORONTO NEVER STOPS BUILDING – THESE PROJECTS BORDER DOWNTOWN’S RAILWAY LINES

The Railway Lands are a great neighbourhood to wander around in. Other than high rises, you can watch the trains coming and going from Union Station.  <The GO Trains below are parked.> There’s parkland, restaurants, public art – and Spadina Avenue and Bathurst Street aren’t far away.This bridge across the railway lines connects the south side with the north, and from there Draper Street, a Heritage Conservation District.This little brick street has survived overall industrialization of the King-Spadina neighbourhood.The street is named after William Henry Draper (1801-77).  He was a lawyer and a politician, and later was appointed Chief Justice of Post-Confederation Ontario in 1869.