46-YEAR-OLD CHARLES & 20-YEAR-OLD NGOZI HAVE DELIVERED A BABY WESTERN LOWLAND GORILLA

The baby is the eleventh of the critically endangered species to begin life at the TORONTO ZOO. As yet, the keepers haven’t been able to get close enough to determine its sex.

“We are very excited with this birth,” said MARIA FRANKE, Curator of Mammals. “Gorillas are under extreme threats in the wild. It’s predicted that the wild population will have an 80% reduction over three generations, and it’s essential that we do everything we can to save this species.”

Over the past 15 years there’ve been many successful births at the TORONTO ZOO – Siberian Tiger cubs, Komodo Dragons, two pandas, several Masai giraffes, a Grevy’s Zebra, a polar bear, gorillas, snow leopards – the list goes on.

To reach the TORONTO Zoo – by car, from downtown, take the 401 Eastbound to Exit 389, Meadowvale Road.  Follow the Zoo signs to 361A Old Finch Avenue.  Large parking lot.

By TTC bus, take the subway (Sheppard Line) to DON MILLS STATION.  Bus #85 leaves from here, and will drop you in front of the Zoo entrance about 45 minutes later.  Along the way, you’ll pass through suburban Don Mills and Scarborough.

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NOW THAT THE PANDAS HAVE LEFT TOWN, OTHER MEMBERS OF TORONTO’S ZOO FAMILY GET TO SHINE

Meet Stevie the fruit bat, an Ontario native – one of several in the Zoo’s collection.

The Zoo has over 20 species of frogs. One of them is the Dusky Gopher Frog. There are a dozen altogether. In 2017 an in vitro fertilization procedure took place, resulting in the first ever metamorphosis of these frogs in Canada. They’re hoping for several more tadpoles to increase the population. Only 100-200 exist in the wild.

Hamlet, the hairy-nosed wombat, has three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. He’s directly related to every hairy-nosed wombat in North America except two, and he’s still full of life when he isn’t sleeping (which is most of the day). Hamlet gets a dental checkup every six months, eats vegetables, timothy hay, vitamin pills & mineral pellets.

Budi, the organutan, is in the middle of sub-adulthood, which begins at age 8 and continues until he’s 15. His face is getting darker and his big cheek pads will soon become slightly more noticeable.

The lemurs and their long tails, which are used for balance and communication.

A ratsnake hatching, 45 centimetres long for now, but it will grow to 2.4 metres as an adult. The Zoo is home to 63 reptile species.

CANADA’S LARGEST ZOO ONCE OCCUPIED PRISON-LIKE QUARTERS NEAR DOWNTOWN TORONTO

First the bad news.  The Riverdale Park Zoo in Cabbagetown dated back to 1881. For the animals, it was much like a prison, with iron bars, cramped enclosures and dark cages everywhere. If you were an animal lover, going there wasn’t a pleasant experience.  <PHOTOS – Toronto Public Library>

Between 1963 and the 1970’s plans were developed for the largest and most modern of Canadian zoological parks. The old zoo was then turned into Riverdale Farm, providing much more space for fewer farm animals and birds.

These days the TORONTO ZOO spreads over 287 hectares (710 acres) in the eastern suburbs – home to over 5,000 animals & 500 species.

Imiq is a member of the Zoo’s Arctic wolf pack. He arrived from Parc Safari in Quebec in November/2017.

The Zoo’s state-of-the-art Wildlife Health Centre, is the first of its kind in Canada. It’s a centre of excellence in animal care through veterinary and reproductive sciences, nutritional physiology, and wildlife research.

<JUNO, the polar bear cub, born at the Zoo>

The TORONTO ZOO is open every day except December 25. It’s easy to get there – by car, from downtown, take the 401 Eastbound to Exit 389, Meadowvale Road.  Follow the Zoo signs to 361A Old Finch Avenue.  Large parking lot.

By TTC bus, take the subway (Sheppard Line) to DON MILLS STATION.  Bus #85 leaves from here, and will drop you in front of the Zoo entrance about 45 minutes later.  Along the way, you’ll pass through suburban Don Mills and Scarborough.

DESPITE THE STRIKE AT TORONTO ZOO, MOTHER NATURE HAS DELIVERED 10 EXOTIC CATS

  The Toronto Zoo is proud to announce the healthy births of snow leopard cubs, clouded leopard cubs and cheetah cubs.

The snow leopard cubs arrived on May 18, born to mother Ena and dad Kota. Ena came to TORONTO from Japan’s Tama Zoo.

For the first time in the Zoo’s history, two clouded leopard cubs were born on Saturday afternoon, May 13 to mom “Pavarti” and dad “Mingma.” Both parents came originally from the Nashville Zoo.

On April 30 five cheetah cubs came into the world. Laini and Patonga are the parents. The arrival of these cubs brings the number of cheetahs born at the Toronto Zoo to 53.

2 MONTHS OLD & WEIGHING IN AT 200 KG., TORONTO ZOO’S BABY RHINO NEEDS A NAME

RHINO1It’s a face with character and it belongs to a two-month-old Indian rhino calf, born at TORONTO Zoo on February 17. It’s growing at a rate of 2.3 kilograms (5 pounds) a day.

Toronto Zoo is part of a special program for Indian rhino conservation and partnered with the Cincinnati Zoo while looking after Ashakiran (that’s her on the left) during her 16-month pregnancy. Indian rhinos are considered a “vulnerable” species, one small level below “endangered”.

RHINO2<PHOTOS – TorStar News Services>

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GREAT NEWS FROM TORONTO’S ZOO – JUNO THE POLAR BEAR CUB IS GAINING WEIGHT

JUNO1 After surviving a near-death experience JUNO the polar bear cub is now feeding six times a day and gaining weight. Her fuzzy white coat is becoming thicker and she now weighs 2.8 kilograms. For a time there it was questionable whether or not she’d survive (her brother had passed away), but thanks to excellent care in the Zoo’s Wildlife Health Centre the tiny bear is doing very well indeed.

JUNO2TORONTO ZOO is collaborating with other accredited zoos to research and understand Polar Bear reproductive biology. For more information and to help support the project go to http://development.torontozoo.com/products/1019481-help-support-polar-bear-conservation.aspx

PANDACUB1

As well, the twin panda cubs at the Z00 are now 12 weeks old and thriving.  Pictured above – one of the cubs enjoying a good yawn.

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TORONTO ZOO’S PANDA CUBS, LYING BACK ON THEIR MINI ARMCHAIRS, ARE MOVING ON UP

PANDATWINS3 <The twins as they were in October, PHOTO – Toronto Zoo>

PANDATWINS1<As they are today, PHOTO – Toronto Zoo>

Twin giant pandas, born a month ago at TORONTO Zoo have outgrown their incubators and are moving into a larger home. They’re still vulnerable, but appear to be doing well and growing quickly.

PANDATWINS2Er Shun, their mother, spends most of her time with them in the Zoo’s maternity centre. As giant panda mothers can only look after one cub at a time, zoo keepers are using a technique called ‘twin swapping’. It seems to be working.ZOO1