FIRST OF ITS KIND IN CANADA – TORONTO ZOO OPENS A STATE-OF-THE-ART WILDLIFE HEALTH CENTRE

The TORONTO Zoo takes pride in being a centre of excellence when it comes to animal care, reproductive sciences, nutritional physiology, conservation and wildlife research.Now the Zoo has a modern facility and a team devoted to wildlife health care.
<Dr. PAULINE DELNATTE working on a “client”.>TORONTO Zoo invites you to see behind-the-scenes in several of the rooms – Diagnostic Imaging, Treatment, Surgery, Clinical Lab and Endocrinology Lab.The Wildlife Health Centre is open to the public daily from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. From the Tundra Zoomobile Station, follow the path adjacent to the Greenhouse.

ANOTHER AFRICAN PENGUIN, ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST ENDANGERED, HAS ARRIVED AT TORONTO ZOO

According to a press release, the African Penguin is one of the most endangered penguin species in the world, The population in the wild has dropped by more than 97% over the past century.

The birds are threatened by food shortages due to climate change and over-fishing, disease, predators, and oil spills, Recent estimates suggest there could be as few as 25,000 breeding pairs left in the wild, the zoo said.

TORONTO ZOO PLANS A $5-MILLION LATE-NIGHT LIGHT SHOW, AND A BABY ZEBRA GETS A NAME

The City has approved a $5-million loan, making way for “Lumina Experience”, an after hours light show. The “immersive illuminations and interactive displays” will be accessible on walking tours that last about an hour.The show will be produced by the MOMENT FACTORY, a multimedia company based in MONTREAL, which has created similar projects in Canada and around the world –  Old Fort Henry in Kingston, Ontario; Singapore Zoo; and Whistler Resort in British Columbia to name three.  The photos below are from Moment Factory’s light exhibits that were installed in other parts of the world.  Each one is different.The TORONTO ZOO has decided on a name for its new zebra foal. Born on February 13, 2019, the little guy is now called OBI – replacing ‘Baby Stripes’. The name is in keeping with the Star Wars-inspired names of his siblings, LEIA and REY . . . 7,500 members of the public voted on a name.This is the third foal TORI, a Grevy’s Zebra, has delivered at TORONTO Zoo. Leia arrived in January 2014 and Rey in July 2016. All three were sired by Jake, an 11-year-old male. An endangered species, these animals are threatened by loss of habitat, competition for resources with domestic livestock; poaching for meat & medicinal purposes; disease and drought.

FROM THE ZOO’S PHOTO ALBUM – ANIMALS & BIRDS THAT CALL ONTARIO & GTR. TORONTO HOME

TORONTO is home to thousands of black & gray SQUIRRELS.  By burying seeds and nuts, they’e an important part of the city’s ecosystem.  Their hard work promotes germination and forest renewal.

The MASSASSAUGA RATTLESNAKE is an endangered species.  Over a dozen have been born at the Zoo.  They’re shy reptiles, and it’s illegal to harass, harm or kill one.

Owls in the Greater TORONTO Area – Great Horned, Eastern Screech, Barred, Northern Saw Whet, Great Grey & occasional/seasonal, the Snowy Owl.Elsa, the ARCTIC FOX, 1.5-years-old, came to TORONTO from Parc Safari.  She’s joined others in the Tundra Trek.

Breathing in the Northland, a member of the Zoo’s POLAR BEAR family.

And one new-resident of Ontario, an AFRICAN PENGUIN, a participant in the Zoo’s Species Survival Plan.  Seventeen new chicks were born here, since the species arrived in 2011.

It’s easy to get to TORONTO ZOO – by car, from downtown, take the 401 Eastbound to Exit 389, Meadowvale Road.  Follow the Zoo signs to 361A Old Finch Avenue.  Large parking lot.  By TTC bus, take the subway (Sheppard Line) to DON MILLS STATION.  Bus #85 leaves from there, and will drop you in front of the Zoo entrance about 45 minutes later.  Along the way, you’ll pass through suburban Don Mills and Scarborough.

ON INT’L SNOW LEOPARD DAY AT TORONTO ZOO, QUAIL & PUMPKINS ARE ON THE MENU

The TORONTO ZOO’s snow leopards Ena, Mylo, and Kita are shown from 9:30am to 4:30pm daily.  One source estimates there are 4,500 to 7,500 snow leopards in the wild and other sources say that number is between 2,500 and 10,000. It is very difficult to get scientifically accurate numbers, as these cats are so elusive and currently, only 2% of their habitat has been thoroughly studied. Threats to snow leopards include poaching, habitat loss, farmer retaliation kills, and more recently groups of wild mastiff dogs.

FEAR OF CENTIPEDES? THE TORONTO ZOO SAYS THE WORD FOR THAT IS CHILOPODOPHOBIA’

Despite their name, centipedes don’t actually have one hundred legs – some have fewer, though others may have many more. Regardless, the majority of these “creepy crawlies” are very small and completely harmless to humans. They spend their lives under rocks and logs and other moist environments.  House centipedes in particular, which many Torontonians might encounter in their basements, cause a lot of fear due to their fast running speed and numerous long legs; however, they may actually be beneficial because they eat smaller invertebrate pests (e.g. silverfish, cockroaches, etc.).