TORONTO’S STREET ARTISTS AND MURALISTS LIVEN UP CORKTOWN’S UNDERPASS PARK

UNDERPASSPARK1<PHOTO ABOVE – Underpass Park in January/2015 & BELOW as it is today>

UNDERPASSPARK11       With help from Mural Routes, Street Art TORONTO, the Pan Am Path, an army of vendors and volunteers, and the painters themselves, Underpass Park has become Downtown Eastside’s most beautiful ‘art park’. It’s beneath the Gardiner Expressway near the foot of River Street in CORKTOWN. UNDERPASSPARK3UNDERPASSPARK7

THE PAN AM GAMES HAVE INVESTED $2.8-MILLION TO ILLUMINATE THE PRINCE EDWARD VIADUCT

VEIL2 VEIL1It’s a longlasting gift to our city. Twelve years after the “Luminous Veil” was installed on the Prince Edward Viaduct, it will be illuminated end-to-end on Saturday night, July 4. At $2.8-million, the light show represents the biggest investment in a single piece of public art in TORONTO.  <PHOTOS – 1) looking up at the Viaduct and the ‘Veil’; and 2) a test run of the illuminations, REDDIT>

VEIL4The Viaduct opened in 1918 minus the “luminous veil” (which was originally created to prevent suicides). The bridge, which spans the Don Valley, carries the Bloor-Danforth subway, four lanes of traffic, and two sidewalks into (what once was) the village of Danforth.  On July 4, the Viaduct will be closed for an evening of celebration with live music, Thrill of the Grill (i.e. plenty of food), illumination of the Veil, and the arrival of the Pan Am Games torch. For more details go to http://www.toronto2015.org/torch-relay & http://www.thedanforth.caPAN-AM9

AN UNDULATING STEEL PIECE OF PUBLIC ART APPEARS ON SUMACH ST. AT EASTERN AVENUE

 One block long and laser cut, this beautiful steel fence can be found on the west side of Sumach Street at Eastern Avenue.  It’s a beaut!  Created by SCOTT EUNSON and MARIANNE LOVINK, the fence portrays the history of Corktown and area.  The two artists worked with local children and an historian to design and build the structure.

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‘WORD COUNT’ ON ABELL STREET RECORDS A PASSING MOMENT IN TORONTO’S ART HISTORY

ABELLSTREET1 TORONTO artist CORWYN LUND often integrates his work into the fabric of the city. ‘Word Count’, on an Abell Street hoarding, is a site-specific project for the Koffler Gallery Off-Site. It memorializes a fleeting moment within TORONTO’s constant urban redevelopment – even in the super cool West Queen West neighbourhood.

ABELLSTREET4Demolished in the winter of 2012, the 3-storey factory warehouse sheltered studios and unsanctioned affordable lofts for artists – live/work spaces, which are now in short supply, especially in this neighbourhood. The work has been up for over two years, and surprisingly it remains almost pristine.

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DAVID PARTRIDGE TOOK A HAMMER AND NAILS & CREATED A FAMOUS CITY HALL MURAL

PARTIRDGE4Born in AKRON, Ohio, Mr. Partridge moved to the UK in 1928, then came to Canada in 1936 where he was educated at the University of TORONTO. He developed the technique of hammering different sized nails into plywood to form “landscape abstractions without the horizon. The nails became low-relief sculptures, which seemed to (his) ex-pilot’s eyes like aerial views of topography.”  He was made a Member of the Order of Canada in 2003.

A SCULPTURAL VERSION OF EASTER ISLAND’S MONOLITHS IS HEADED FOR LIBERTY VILLAGE

BREUNING1 OLAF BREUNING, the Swiss-born, New York-based artist, will soon begin assembling his first-ever public art installation in TORONTO’s Liberty Village.  Funded by the City of Toronto’s “percent planning” (a development levy), “The Guardians” is based on Breuning’s earlier work, “Easter Bunnies”/2004.  The “Bunnies” refer to the monolithic sculptures found on Easter Island.  OLAF BREUNING:  “With these huge things standing there, you think, ‘How could these have arrived?’ They look like they could fall apart in a second, these stones that are standing on edge or burned. I tried to create a sculpture with the same idea. They look like nothing is balanced, despite being made out of types of metal; so while they’re in fact very steady, hopefully when you look at them, you’ll think, ‘Oh, they could just fall down.’”

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