GRANGE PARK GETS ITS $15-MILLION MAKEOVER THANKS TO TORONTO & W. GALEN WESTON

GRANGEPK4The City of TORONTO and private donor W. Galen Weston are funding the renovation of GRANGE PARK to the tune of $15-million. Work has now begun.

GRANGEPK1<“Hanging on the Gates of Grange Park”/1925, hand-tinted photo, William James Collection, City of Toronto Archives>

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<Grange Park under construction & downtown skyline, May/2016 – PHOTO Ross Winter>

GRANGEPK3<The Grange and Grange Park under constructionThe park belongs to the Art Gallery of Ontario. It was bequeathed by Harriet Boulton Smith to what was then called the Art Museum of Toronto. In 1911 the City of TORONTO agreed to maintain the grounds as a public park, but in a continuing policy of tax cutting this has become much more difficult than it used to be.

GRANGEPK5<Grange Park, overhead view of restored elliptical carriage path, rendering courtesy of GPAC>

GRANGEPK7The famous bronze sculpture ‘Large Two Forms’ by Henry Moore, will be moved from the corner of Dundas Street West and McCaul into the centre of the park. “Pretty damn cool!” said Councillor Joe Cressy.

THE AWARD-WINNING 2016 CHRISTMAS FLOWER SHOW AT ALLAN GARDENS’ CONSERVATORY

Covering more than 16,000 square feet, the Allan Gardens greenhouses and palm court banish gray skies and add colour to life in the big city. This year the show was named the ‘Garden Event of the Year’ by Canadian Garden Tourism Awards.

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QUEEN’S PARK, HOME TO ONTARIO’S LEGISLATURE, WAS NAMED IN HONOUR OF QUEEN VICTORIA

QUEENSPK5Opened in 1860 by Edward, Prince of Wales, QUEEN’S PARK is divided into two sections – the southern part belongs to the Government of Ontario and is the site of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario <PICTURED ABOVE>. The northern half is owned by the University of TORONTO, and was leased to the city in 1854 for 999 years.

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QUEEN’S PARK is dominated by large trees: little leaf lindens, Norway maples, silver maples, white oak, red oak, ash species, honey locust, Austrian pine, white pine and white birch. Pathways radiate outwards from an equestrian statue of Edward VII.

SUMMERHILL’S ROSEHILL PARK & GARDEN ARE A COUPLE OF BLOCKS EAST OF ST. CLAIR & YONGE

rosehill3Walk two blocks east of bustling St. Clair and Yonge, and you’re in a different world altogether – Rosehill Park, Rosehill Garden, the Summerhill neighbourhood of Victorian-era homes, and David Balfour Park and ravine.  Rosehill Reservoir, built in 1873/74, covered over in the 1960’s, became the city’s first environmentally friendly green roof.  Adjacent Rosehill Garden was built on a former playground.

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ROSEHILL GARDEN, built on a former playground, was a joint City and neighbourhood project, and took five years of negotiating and fundraising to complete.  Year ’round it’s one of TORONTO’s most beautiful public spaces.

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Fonds 200, Series 372, Subseries 72 - Toronto Water Works photog

<BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO – the uncovered Rosehill Reservoir in 1933, Toronto City Archives>

AT CORKTOWN COMMON PARK YOU CAN ESCAPE THE CITY WHILE REMAINING IN THE MIDDLE OF IT

CORKTOWN COMMON is a wonderful new creation from WATERFRONT TORONTO and the federal government. This splendid park, which opened recently, covers 73 hectares (180 acres) in the West Don Lands, within easy walking distance of King Street East at River.

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More than 700 maturish trees have been planted, along with thousands of shrubs, a living marsh, ground cover and aquatic plants. There are playgrounds, a splash pad, a large central lawn, a bike path and an athletic field.

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Best of all, the topography rises and falls, presenting unique views of the city’s skyline and eastside industrial buildings, bridges and rail lines. A lengthy berm functions as both a lookout and flood protector for TORONTO’s eastern downtown.

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PHOTO CREDITS – Corktown Common aerial by http://www.kapflyer.wordpress.com & kids playing http://www.oulahen.com

TORONTO’s FIRST OUTDOOR COVERED ICE RINK OPENS IN A REBUILT GREENWOOD PARK

GREENWOOD4As winter blows in, East End kids have a brand new $3.4-million sheltered ice rink and skatepath to check out.  This past weekend, hundreds of kids and grownups laced up their skates and did precisely that.  The rink, which features new change rooms and an elegant rooftop, is one of several improvements made recently to Greenwood Park.  The Friends of Greenwood, who pushed hard for the park upgrade, can take a well-deserved bow.  Funding came from TORONTO’s ‘state of good repair and cash-in-lieu developer’s fund’<PHOTO BELOW – Blogto>

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WHERE IN TORONTO WOULD YOU FIND SOMETHING LIKE THIS? – HIGH PARK ZOO NO DOUBT

The zoo inside High Park is located on Deer Pen Road and is accessible via the Parkside Road entrance. There is plenty of parking in front of the zoo’s entrance.  The zoo is open all year long from 7 am till dusk. There are 6 or 7 enclosed areas on either side of Deer Pen road where the animals of the zoo live. You can find bison, deer, llamas, peacocks, highland cattle, etc.