STERLING ROAD WON’T BE QUITE THE SAME AFTER SEPT. 22 – WHEN ‘MOCA’ OPENS ITS DOORS

<Lois Andison’s “golden on sterling”, produced for MOCA’s Benefit Editions>

After two years in the making, TORONTO’s Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) is about ready for its debut in the former Tower Automotive Building, 158 Sterling Road. Built in 1920, the heritage building has a long history of aluminum manufacturing, sheet-metal casting and automotive parts creating.

Sterling Road is within walking distance of 2 streetcar/bus lines, 2 stops on the the Bloor-Danforth subway (Line 2) & a GO transit station.  <PHOTO by Arash Moaliemi>

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TORONTO ART GALLERIES ARE COLONIZING A WEST END POST-INDUSTRIAL NEIGHBOURHOOD

GALLERIES3First there was ARSENAL/DIVISION GALLERY (45 Ernest Avenue, photo above artoronto.ca), then came JESSICA BRADLEY’S ANNEX (74 Miller Street), followed by the CLINT ROENISCH GALLERY (190 St. Helen’s Avenue), DANIEL FARIA GALLERY (188 St. Helen’s), the SCRAP METAL GALLERY (11 Dublin Street, unit E), KATZMAN CONTEMPORARY (86 Miller Street), and this month TORONTO PHOTOGRAPHER’S WORKSHOP (170 St. Helen’s Avenue) opened its doors.

GALLERIES2GALLERIES12GALLERIES4GALLERIES6GALLERIES9<PHOTOS ABOVE – 1 & 2 Arsenal/Division; 3 Clint Roenisch; 4,5 Scrap Metal; 6 Toronto Photographer’s Workshop>

GALLERIES7These vast spaces were once lumber warehouses, scrap metal yards, garages, and a couple of fish storage plants. Gallery owners saw great potential here. Spaces this size are not readily available in TORONTO’s booming real estate market.

The galleries are scattered around a neighbourhood on the fringe of the up-and-coming JUNCTION between Davenport Road and College Street, Lansdowne Avenue and Miller Street.GALLERIES5