CANADIAN IMPRESSIONIST ART DOES INDEED EXIST AND SOME OF IT’S ON TOUR IN EUROPE

Kunsthalle München, Kanada, Kanada und der Expressionismus, Vernissage, 18.7.2019.  The National Gallery of Canada is opening some eyes in MUNICH, as ‘Canada and Impressionism: New Horizons, 1880-1930’ has been installed at the Kunsthalle Munchen. Curiosity has led to lineups. < ABOVE – Lineup on  opening night, Kunsthalle Munich, photo – ‘Canadian Art’ magazine>

<Laura Muntz, ‘The Pink Dress’, 1897, oil on canvas, private collection, TorontoThe National Gallery’s Senior Curator, KATERINA ATANASSOVA, said: “To me, this period is the most important period in the history of Canadian art.”<ABOVE – Clarence Gagnon, ‘Old Houses’, Baie-Saint-Paul, 1912, oil on canvas, private collection, Toronto>  Ms. Atanassaova said the Canadian style of Impressionism is different because of our northern climate. The light of Canada differs from the light one would find in a warm Mediterranean climate. Also, Canadian artists often had to work very quickly, because their fingers were in danger of freezing if they didn’t.<ABOVE – Helen McNicoll, ‘Sunny September’, 1913, oil on canvas, private collection, Toronto>  For the record – more than a thousand attended on opening night. ‘Canadian Impressionism’ will be on display in Munich until November 19th. Then it moves on to Lausanne, Switzerland, and from there to Montpellier, France. In the fall of 2020 the tour will come to an end at home base in Ottawa – then we’ll get to see it.

CANADA’S HOUSE OF COMMONS AND SENATE ARE MOVING INTO NEW DIGS FOR THE NEXT 12 + YEARS

<PHOTO – carpeting design for the temporary Senate chamber>

Probably it will take longer than a dozen years, but Canada’s Senators and Members of Parliament have left behind their home in the Centre Block and are in the process of moving. While they’re gone, the Centre Block will be refurbished, cleaned, and restored.  The temporary Senate chamber, all in red <ABOVE>, will be across Wellington Street from Parliament Hill. Once it was OTTAWA’s beaux-arts railway station, then a government conference centre, and now an elaborate home for the 105 members of the Upper House of Parliament.

The temporary House of Commons is a glass-and-steel addition within the courtyard of the West Block on Parliament Hill. It was designed by MONTREAL firms ARCOP and EVOQ. The glass ceiling will capture heat in the winter and expel it in the summer.  Underground levels include a welcome centre where visitors will go through security screening before entering. Parliament is one of Canada’s top tourism sites and despite the move, tourists will still be able to visit it.

<PHOTO – THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang>

THIS WEEK I VISITED CANADA’S ‘MOST EDUCATED CITY’ – OTTAWA – POPULATION ONE MILLION

<A utility box painting on Rideau Street>

<ABOVE – The Library of Parliament>

<OTTAWA has a growing number of bike paths.>

<Demolition near famed BYWARD MARKET, to be replaced by a Brazilian restaurant>

The 1927 Beaux Arts Wellington Building
Architect: NORR Architects & Engineers Limited
Heritage Conservation Architect: Architecture EVOQ inc.
Image: doublespace photography

<ABOVE – the “original” House of Commons facing a 25-year reno>

<PHOTO – looking down on the National Gallery>  OTTAWA – on the surface – is like any other Canadian city. But it’s also our national capital, home to Parliament, the National Gallery, National Arts Centre, several post-secondary institutions, the Governor-General and Prime Minister’s residences, posh Rockcliffe, a collection of first-rate museums. the National War Memorial – and it boasts low unemployment.The OAG (Ottawa Art Gallery), 50 MacKenzie King Bridge, recently opened a brand new five-storey building in the capital.

Within the building – a fine cafe and restaurant, research facility, two rooftop terraces, and five times the space the gallery once had.OTTAWA Art Gallery hours – 9 am to 9 pm. Architects – KPMB

The highlight of my visit was the Canadian War Museum, 1 Vimy Place in LeBreton Flats – our country’s collection of military history. It’s massive. You could spend an entire day here.

Among the exhibits – models for Canada’s Vimy Ridge Monument in France <photo above>, 2,500 pieces of war art, audio-visual displays, naval guns, multiple tanks, motorcycles and aircraft.

Within the walls of the War Museum – the Military History Research Centre and a collection of about 500,000 artifacts, including uniforms, medals, weapons, military vehicles and artillery.

The original CWM was founded in 1880; the new one opened in May/2005. Architects – Raymond Moriyama and Teshima

ALL ROADS LED TO OTTAWA THIS PAST WEEKEND FOR CANADA’S 150TH BIRTHDAY PARTY

I checked things out last week and, believe me, OTTAWA, Canada’s capital, has never looked better.

<PHOTOS ABOVE – looking down on the National Gallery & the chapel of the former Rideau Street Convent, 1880’s, National Gallery of Canada.>

<PHOTOS – Ottawa’s oldest bar in the By Ward Market & Changing of the Guard, 10 am each morning on Parliament Hill.>

<PHOTOS ABOVE – locks leading up to the Rideau Canal & security bollards behind the American embassy provide a nifty protected bike path.>

<PHOTO – the splendid Library of Parliament, oldest building on The Hill>

<House of Commons>

<The Senate>

<The Supreme Court of CanadaDriving from TORONTO to OTTAWA take the eastbound 401 to either picturesque Highway 115 north at KINGSTON; or the much faster 416 north to the 417 into downtown OTTAWA. Exit at Metcalfe Street, and be prepared for bike paths, one-way streets and no parking zones. Advice – check into your hotel, leave the car and walk or take public transit.

OTTAWA, CANADA’S CAPITAL CITY, IS NO STRANGER TO INCLEMENT WEATHER – SEE BELOW

GUY JONES is a videographer who brings history to life by editing old films and making them more watchable. He slows them down to a natural speed and adds sound – making each a totally new viewing experience.

GUY JONES is a videographer who brings history to life by editing old films and making them more watchable. He slows them down to a natural speed and adds sound – making each a totally new viewing experience.  A bit premature, but here are some “Streets scenes in OTTAWA after a blizzard, December/1942”.  The YouTube video focuses on digging out the city’s streetcars after a blizzard. Film speed has been slowed down, and sound added. It’s 5 minutes long . . . . .  . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErNTvl_psw0&feature=youtu.be

Work by & about the late sculptor, LOUISE BOURGEOIS, in London, Ottawa & Toronto

BOURGEOIS2

This summer, there’s no escaping the work of sculptor, LOUISE BOURGEOIS, who passed away three years ago.  LONDON’s Saatchi Gallery is showing “After Louise”, created in 2011 by WENDY MAYER.  Her head pops out of a giant black ball, studded with pins and needles. Around her neck is a feather collar as grand as a courtier’s ruff.  To see her face-to-face you must get down on your knees.  Artist WENDY MAYER: “I feel connected to her as a woman, a mother, a sculptor and through our shared background in mathematics. When she died in 2010, I wanted to acknowledge her unwitting contribution to my career as a sculptor and created her portrait as a pin cushion doll’.

BOURGEOIS3The best-known work by LOUISE BOURGEOIS <PHOTO ABOVE> is “Maman”, on permanent display in front of the National Gallery of Canada, OTTAWA.

BOURGEOIS5TORONTO’s Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MOCCA), 952 Queen Street West recently presented an exhibition of Ms. Bourgeois’ work.

BOURGEOIS4