BRYAN AND ALAN HAVE A SURPRISE ENCOUNTER ENROUTE TO THEIR COTTAGE

You don’t want to mess with one of these. Two friends, traveling home from a restaurant north of their cottage, wrote “fortunately we saw the moose way in the distance being chased by a dog. It ran a long way on the road, then turned around and ran back past us, and then finally into the bush.”

“Worse still – we were in the red Prius!  Talk about waving a flag at a bull!” – BRYAN BLENKIN (driver) ALAN ROWE (photographer)

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THIS WEEK I VISITED CANADA’S ‘MOST EDUCATED CITY’ – OTTAWA – POPULATION ONE MILLION

<A utility box painting on Rideau Street>

<ABOVE – The Library of Parliament>

<OTTAWA has a growing number of bike paths.>

<Demolition near famed BYWARD MARKET, to be replaced by a Brazilian restaurant>

The 1927 Beaux Arts Wellington Building, soon to be the temporary House of Commons for 25 years, while the original undergoes renovations on Parliament Hill.
Architect: NORR Architects & Engineers Limited
Heritage Conservation Architect: Architecture EVOQ inc.
Image: doublespace photography

<ABOVE – the “original” House of Commons facing a 25-year reno>

<PHOTO – looking down on the National Gallery>

OTTAWA – on the surface – is like any other Canadian city. But it’s also our national capital, home to Parliament, the National Gallery, National Arts Centre, several post-secondary institutions, the Governor-General and Prime Minister’s residences, posh Rockcliffe, a collection of first-rate museums. the National War Memorial – and it boasts low unemployment.

The OAG (Ottawa Art Gallery), 50 MacKenzie King Bridge, recently opened a brand new five-storey building in the capital. <PHOTO ABOVE – Ross Winter>

Within the building – a fine cafe and restaurant, research facility, two rooftop terraces, and five times the space the gallery once had.

OTTAWA Art Gallery hours – 9 am to 9 pm. Architects – KPMB

The highlight of my visit was the Canadian War Museum, 1 Vimy Place in LeBreton Flats – our country’s collection of military history. It’s massive. You could spend an entire day here.

Among the exhibits – models for Canada’s Vimy Ridge Monument in France <photo above>, 2,500 pieces of war art, audio-visual displays, naval guns, multiple tanks, motorcycles and aircraft.

Within the walls of the War Museum – the Military History Research Centre and a collection of about 500,000 artifacts, including uniforms, medals, weapons, military vehicles and artillery.

The original CWM was founded in 1880; the new one opened in May/2005. Architects – Raymond Moriyama and Teshima

CHARITY THE COW HAS LEFT HER LOFTY PERCH IN CATHEDRALTOWN AND RETURNED TO DONOR

High above Charity Crescent in the suburb of Cathedraltown, came a sculpture called ‘Charity, Perpetuation of Perfection’. “The last thing that would cross my mind would be to raise a life-sized cow with chrome-like finish two storeys in the air and consider that proper,” said local resident Danny Dasilva. “I hate it.”

Donated by well-meaning developer HELEN ROMAN-BARBER, the statue honoured a prize-winning show cow that died in 1988. It was put there with the approval of city councillor ALAN HO – who faced the wrath of the populace.

Anyway, Charity has hit the road. She’s on her way back to Ms. Roman-Barber. Who says the suburbs are dull?

THIS 1928 BUICK – USED EXTENSIVELY BY ROYALTY – WAS MADE IN OSHAWA, ONTARIO

<1928 model year McLaughlin-Buick 496 Tourer>

The Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is, and has long been, a major automobile manufacturing region.  From 1876, OSHAWA was home to the McLaughlin Carriage Company, which produced  more than 25,000 carriages a year.  By 1915, under the presidency of “Colonel” Sam McLaughlin, the company was turning out roughly one horseless carriage every ten minutes.

The McLaughlin-Buick 496 Tourer (ABOVE) was one of only two built for a royal visit to Canada.  Custom-built McLaughlin-Buicks, designed and detailed with elegance in mind, were used extensively by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VIII), his brother the Duke of York (later King George VI) and shipped from province to province by train.  Somehow they ended up in the United Kingdom.

THE TORONTO DANCE THEATRE CELEBRATES 50 YEARS OF OUTSIDE-THE-BOX CREATIVITY

<1968 – The founders Patricia Beatty, David Earle and Peter Randazzo. That year the company received an Ontario Arts Council grant of $1,250.>

Photos below from the Toronto Dance Theatre’s extensive archive. For more titles & the names of all the dancers and choreographers, plus the history of the company go to https://tdt.org/tdt50/

<1969 – Danny Grossman & Patricia Beatty in ‘Against Sleep’; choreography Patricia Beatty, photo by David Davis>

<1976 – ‘National Spirit’, choreography by Danny Grossman; photographer unidentified>

<1990 – The Company in front of the Winchester Dance Theatre, 80 Winchester, Cabbagetown, a converted church owned by the Company, which houses a performance space & the Toronto Dance Theatre School.>

<1991 – At the Joyce dance theatre in New York City where they’ve performed many times; opening night, November/1991>

<2003 – ‘Sly Verb’, choreography by Christopher House; photograph by David Hou>

<2005 – ‘In The Boneyard’ with ‘The Hidden Cameras’, choreography by Christopher House>

<2006 – ‘Timecode Break’, choreography by Christopher House; photograph by Aaron McKenzie Fraser>

<2009 – ‘Awareness Etudes for 6 Performers & an Audience’, from the Berlin/Toronto Project, choreography by Felix Marchand; photograph by David Hou>

<2017 – ‘Mercury Dust’, choreography by Emily Law; photo Omer Yukseker>

In NOW Magazine this week – “50 Things To Know About the TORONTO DANCE THEATRE” by KATHLEEN SMITH. You’ll find the article at https://nowtoronto.com/culture/stage/50-things-to-know-about-toronto-dance-theatre/

      <The Toronto Dance Theatre Company in BOGOTA, Colombia, 2017>