CHARITY THE COW HAS LEFT HER LOFTY PERCH IN CATHEDRALTOWN AND RETURNED TO DONOR

High above Charity Crescent in the suburb of Cathedraltown, came a sculpture called ‘Charity, Perpetuation of Perfection’. “The last thing that would cross my mind would be to raise a life-sized cow with chrome-like finish two storeys in the air and consider that proper,” said local resident Danny Dasilva. “I hate it.”

Donated by well-meaning developer HELEN ROMAN-BARBER, the statue honoured a prize-winning show cow that died in 1988. It was put there with the approval of city councillor ALAN HO – who faced the wrath of the populace.

Anyway, Charity has hit the road. She’s on her way back to Ms. Roman-Barber. Who says the suburbs are dull?

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THIS 1928 BUICK – USED EXTENSIVELY BY ROYALTY – WAS MADE IN OSHAWA, ONTARIO

<1928 model year McLaughlin-Buick 496 Tourer>

The Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is, and has long been, a major automobile manufacturing region.  From 1876, OSHAWA was home to the McLaughlin Carriage Company, which produced  more than 25,000 carriages a year.  By 1915, under the presidency of “Colonel” Sam McLaughlin, the company was turning out roughly one horseless carriage every ten minutes.

The McLaughlin-Buick 496 Tourer (ABOVE) was one of only two built for a royal visit to Canada.  Custom-built McLaughlin-Buicks, designed and detailed with elegance in mind, were used extensively by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VIII), his brother the Duke of York (later King George VI) and shipped from province to province by train.  Somehow they ended up in the United Kingdom.

AS DOUG FORD PLOWS AHEAD TO BECOME PREMIER, SOME HEADLINES TO CONSIDER – CHECK THEM OUT

<DOUG FORD – “Who needs hush money?”, editorial cartoon, THEO MOUDAKIS, Toronto Star>

Progressive Conservative leader DOUG FORD continues to lead in Ontario’s provincial election polls. He may become premier. Between now and then it’s worth searching for the real stories behind the headlines.

ETC., ETC., ETC.

TORONTO has endured four years with the Ford brothers – the late Mayor Rob Ford & former city councillor Doug Ford. As premier, Doug’s decision-making will affect not only Ontario’s capital city, but the entire province. Election Day is Thursday, June 7.

THE TORONTO DANCE THEATRE CELEBRATES 50 YEARS OF OUTSIDE-THE-BOX CREATIVITY

<1968 – The founders Patricia Beatty, David Earle and Peter Randazzo. That year the company received an Ontario Arts Council grant of $1,250.>

Photos below from the Toronto Dance Theatre’s extensive archive. For more titles & the names of all the dancers and choreographers, plus the history of the company go to https://tdt.org/tdt50/

<1969 – Danny Grossman & Patricia Beatty in ‘Against Sleep’; choreography Patricia Beatty, photo by David Davis>

<1976 – ‘National Spirit’, choreography by Danny Grossman; photographer unidentified>

<1990 – The Company in front of the Winchester Dance Theatre, 80 Winchester, Cabbagetown, a converted church owned by the Company, which houses a performance space & the Toronto Dance Theatre School.>

<1991 – At the Joyce dance theatre in New York City where they’ve performed many times; opening night, November/1991>

<2003 – ‘Sly Verb’, choreography by Christopher House; photograph by David Hou>

<2005 – ‘In The Boneyard’ with ‘The Hidden Cameras’, choreography by Christopher House>

<2006 – ‘Timecode Break’, choreography by Christopher House; photograph by Aaron McKenzie Fraser>

<2009 – ‘Awareness Etudes for 6 Performers & an Audience’, from the Berlin/Toronto Project, choreography by Felix Marchand; photograph by David Hou>

<2017 – ‘Mercury Dust’, choreography by Emily Law; photo Omer Yukseker>

In NOW Magazine this week – “50 Things To Know About the TORONTO DANCE THEATRE” by KATHLEEN SMITH. You’ll find the article at https://nowtoronto.com/culture/stage/50-things-to-know-about-toronto-dance-theatre/

      <The Toronto Dance Theatre Company in BOGOTA, Colombia, 2017>

MULTI-MEDIA ARTIST PHILIP HARE’S HAND-STITCHED “FACELESS FACES” EXHIBIT FOCUSES ON TERRORISM

 These days terrorism looms high above the world, and sex, religion, money and other manipulative devices are what drives it. In every office, home and social media group someone is being terrorized. It’s only a matter of scale, says Mr. Hare.

Working with the terrorism theme, PHILIP HARE created an imposing trio of large, hand-stitched textile works. Hare says this is the first time he’s seen all three of them, top-to-bottom, together on one wall. (10-foot-high ceilings are at a premium in Leslieville houses.)

THE NEW YORK TIMES ‘BUSINESS DAY’ ON WHY TORONTO MADE THE ‘PLAYOFFS’ FOR AMAZON’S HQ2

The New York Times correspondent in Canada – IAN AUSTEN – wrote “regardless of the outcome, the announcement that the city remains a contender, shows how much progress TORONTO and the surrounding region, have made in establishing themselves as a major technology centre.”

TORONTO has two important virtues, in addition to becoming a technology hub. One is Canada’s immigration policy. Mayor JOHN TORY said when he was in New York recently, he found American executives were very interested in Canada’s unlimited visa program for certain skilled workers. Visas are granted at lightning speed, compared with the complicated American system.

TORONTO’s second asset is its publicly funded university and college system. The University of Waterloo has long been recognized as a top technology school; the University of TORONTO is a major centre for research in Artificial Intelligence. The province of Ontario has increased funding for AI programs by $30-million CAD.

TORONTO’s bid proposes several potential sites for HQ2, among them the largely abandoned Docklands <ABOVE> that will include a forthcoming Google-related technology redevelopment. “We don’t know what they’re expecting from us,” said the mayor. “There has been no playbook or playoff schedule supplied to the 20 finalists.”