ROSEDALE, SETTLED IN 1820, IS TORONTO’S VERSION OF LONDON’S HAMPSTEAD – BUT WITH RAVINES

ROSEDALE4‘R’ is for Rosedale, proclaims a condo billboard along the frontier of one of TORONTO’s oldest inner suburbs and one of its wealthiest.

ROSEDALE1The subway and two bus lines run through the neighbourhood.

ROSEDALE78,000 live within its precinct, and there’s plenty of ‘Old Money” around.  Rosedale is crisscrossed by three ravines, and its streets go uphill and downdale.  It’s a wonderful place to walk, run and bicycle; the gardens and trees are gorgeous, and there are few fences or barricades.  You can get lost in here, but the locals are quite friendly and helpful.

ROSEDALE2ROSEDALE9ROSEDALE5Along the Yonge Street edge of Rosedale are several fine restaurants and bars, but within the neighbourhood it’s all houses, parks, gardens, bridges, ravines – and one small row of shops where refreshments are available.

ROSEDALE8ROSEDALE3ROSEDALE6Main Street Rosedale is Yonge Street, from roughly Bloor to Summerhill.
  Subway stop – ROSEDALE, and then walk or take Bus #82; or Subway stop – SHERBOURNE, and then Bus #75

ROSEDALE11

Advertisements

BAD NEWS FROM MOVIELAND: THE HUMBER IS ABOUT TO BE DEMOLISHED FOR A CONDO

HUMBER9It’s always sad when a movie theatre is torn down. These happy gathering places are oftentimes the heart and soul of a community, and when it’s a beauty like The Humber doubly so.

HUMBER4HUMBER5HUMBER6<BLACK & WHITE PHOTOS – The Humber when it opened in 1949>

Opened in 1949 as an Odeon, it was shut down in 2003 and then re-opened in 2011. Four cinemas (two downstairs) were created out of the original two, but the integrity of the building was maintained. This historic cinema (which reminds me of the old downtown Carlton) could soon disappear and be replaced by a 14-storey mixed-use building. There might be a theatre inside, and then again there might not.

HUMBER8HUMBER3TORONTO has at least 10 intact, fully functioning neighbourhood cinemas – many of them survivors from the Golden Age. It appears that The Humber won‘t be joining that club.

HUMBER10

THE GLOBE & MAIL, CANADA’S OLDEST NATIONAL NEWSPAPER, DEACCESSIONS ITS PHOTO LIBRARY

GLOBE13For those who love newspapers, history and photography of the analogue age, The Globe and Mail is opening up its archive this spring. The national newspaper’s Old Press Room is showing a collection of captioned images from the past – beautifully presented.

GLOBE2The Globe’s archive contains 750,000 press photographs. An edited collection of 25,000 will be donated to the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada. The remainder will be made available to various institutions and exhibitions – including the 175 images in this one.

GLOBE8Included in the exhibit – still photographs and news footage from Arthur Lipsett’s seminal film “Very Nice, Very Nice”, made by the National Film Board of Canada in 1961. Animation of prints from The Globe and Mail and a film of the obsolete industrial technology of the newspaper factory play alongside.

GLOBE6<Prime Minister Pierre Eliot Trudeau kicks off the Grey Cup Game in 1970; photos JAMES FISH>

GLOBE9<Finnish architect Viljo Revell, architect of TORONTO’s New City Hall with Prof. Takamasa Yoshizaka, ca1960; PHOTO Gilbert A. Milne>

GLOBE7<Globe and Mail writers Scott Young (father of Neil) and Kay Kritzwiser en route to cover the Royal Tour, 1959>

GLOBE11

QUIRKY CROFT STREET HONOURS JOHN CROFT, THE GREAT TORONTO FIRE’S ONLY CASUALTY, 1904

CROFTSTREET1After a large part of TORONTO burned down 112 years ago this month, dynamiters were hired to blow up the shells of the destroyed buildings.  JOHN CROFT of Parliament Street, 38, father of three, was one of them.

CROFTSTREET3On May 4, his team set 33 dynamite blasts.  The last 3, under a wall at W. J. Gage and Company, failed to go off.  Mr. Croft ran up to investigate and, as fate would have it, was killed by an explosion.

CROFTSTREET5A double-sided Croft Street mural honours both John Croft, and the events of April 19, 1904.

CROFTSTREET4

CROFT STREET is a higgledy piggledy laneway of colourful murals, an ode to both Monty the Cat (deceased) and TORONTO’s black squirrels, a feminist bookstore, tumbledown garages and  a variety of architectural styles.  It runs for two blocks, from Harbord to College Street, east of Bathurst. Streetcar #506 takes you there.

Black and white photos: William James & W. J. Whitingham/City of Toronto Archives