ONE WAY TO USE UP SOME TIME – VISIT TORONTO ARCHIVES & SIDEWALK LABS’ ‘OLD TORONTO’

<TORONTO skyline as it once was, ca1984-1998, City of Toronto Archives & Sidewalk Labs><Far Enough Farm, Toronto Island, 1970><ICEBOATS, Toronto Island, ca1989-1998><A Toronto Island Beach, July, 1982><Toronto Island gardens, ca1989-1998>30,000+ historic photos are on-line. An invaluable research facility, the OLD TORONTO website is very easy to use. You’ll find it at https://oldto.sidewalklabs.com/

IN THIS 1930 PHOTO BY WILLIAM JAMES, OLD CITY HALL’S CLOCK TOWER STANDS OUT

<The cluster of structures behind city hall are the T. Eaton Company’s factory buildings where goods for Eaton department stores were manufactured. On the left you can see early parking lots that replaced demolished buildings. Photo by William James, City of Toronto Archives>

IN THE ‘GOOD OLD DAYS’ TORONTO’S CHILDREN HAD THE RUN OF THE STREETS

In a growing, dirty and dangerous city, children created their own playgrounds. Photographers found them in laneways, backyards, behind houses, on construction sites, sitting on stoops and staircases and playing chicken with streetcars.

For immigrant children in The Ward (officially known as St. John’s Ward), TORONTO’s downtown slum, the street was where they played, watched and wandered. Here they were masters of their own destiny.The Playground Movement in Canada began in the early 1900’s. TORONTO’s Cherry Street Playground opened in 1909, St. Andrew’s and Elizabeth Street playgrounds in 1913. A department of social work was established in 1914 at the University of Toronto. The Ward became the site of early health and hygiene planning and slum clearance.  PHOTOS – City of Toronto Archives – Website – http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=7cb4ba2ae8b1e310VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD

<PHOTO ABOVE – a modern playground in newly renovated GRANGE PARK, behind the Art Gallery of Ontario.>

A NEW EXHIBIT AT THE CITY OF TORONTO ARCHIVES – “FROM STREETS TO PLAYGROUNDS”

A1606160-ArchivesExhibit Web Banner v2.inddIn the good old days, many TORONTO children had the run of the streets. An exhibition from the vast photography collection of our city’s archives captures the kids at work and play in a growing, dirty and dangerous city.  Photographers found them in laneways, backyards, behind houses, on construction sites, sitting on stoops and staircases.

The City of TORONTO Archives occupies an impressive building at 255 Spadina Road. While there you can see the stacks through a glass window – boxes and boxes of our city’s history, and over a million photographs.  Website – http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=7cb4ba2ae8b1e310VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD