A FRIEND DIDN’T KNOW THAT SOME BIRDS RISE AT 3:00 AM & START SINGING – HE KNOWS NOW.

Before TORONTO traffic and construction starts in the morning, some birds are up well before the sun. Not only do they sing in the morning, but they sing loud. Robins, for instance, are so sensitive to light and they’re such early risers that even a tiny bit of light is enough to wake them up and start them chirping.DAVID SIBLEY, a birder, artist, and author of ‘What It’s Like To Be A Bird’ says if you’re bored, try watching birds. “Birds make a lot of noise and their songs and calls all mean something. It takes some practice to hear them, but once you start noticing these sounds you will hear them everywhere.”“In these days when travel is restricted, when a lot of experiences are impossible, birds bring the experience to you.” – DAVID SIBLEY Yesterday two cardinals visited. They seem to come only once every year. This year they were early, spent a few minutes looking around, and then took off – never to be seen again until 2021. I live close to the Don Valley, and probably their permanent residence is somewhere down there.  There are plenty of birds and a wildlife sanctuary in the Don Ravine.

LATEST MEMBER OF THE TORONTO ZOO FAMILY, A MASSAI GIRAFFE, HAS SAFELY ARRIVED

Named for now Baby Long Legs, the calf was born to Mstari, a six-year-old Massai giraffe, and Kiko, a seven-year-old. The little one is not camera-shy and has been making appearances all over the internet.TORONTO Zoo’s CEO, Dolf DeJong, in a news release, said “This birth is an important contribution to a genetically healthy Masai giraffe population. They are the most genetically valuable giraffes in North America.” There are now only 35,000 of them left in the wild. Over the last 30 years there has been a 50% decline in the numbers of Masai.The Zoo, which is in COVID-19 lockdown at this time, has established a new campaign to help support the giraffe family. The goal is to raise $70,000 to help finance these rare mammals. Since the 1980’s the Toronto Zoo has birthed 19 giraffe, including Mstari and her mother, Twiga.

THE WORLD’S OLDEST QUEER BOOKSHOP WAS ON A TIGHTROPE UNTIL ITS SURVIVAL FUND KICKED IN

The Glad Day Bookshop is a popular gathering place for TORONTO’s queer and trans community. Everyone is welcome – drag queens, artists, book buyers, DJs, readers and talkers. The rent for this beautiful space at 499 Church Street is $18,000 a month, which sounds like quite a responsibility, but it’s in a popular neighbourhood.Enter the Glad Day Emergency Survival Fund for LGBTQ2S artists, performers and tip-based workers, along with the Bookshop itself. MICHAEL ERICKSON, Glad Day’s lead owner told the Globe and Mail: “It was life saving. A lot of us felt powerless in this crisis (affecting the community). We didn’t know how to help – and then our fund provided people a really concrete and immediate way to give a bit of money and know they were making a difference.”So far Glad Day and other community members are staying afloat. But more donations – big and small – are most welcome at this address – http://www.gladdaylit.ca