ANDREW OWEN (AO1) DEPICTS A MULTIPLICITY OF PERSONA AND A RANGE OF MOODS

As a professional artist, and a pioneer public art producer, ANDREW OWEN (A01) was one of the first to recognize the value of street art in 1980’s TORONTO.  His projects – paintings, photo-based works and pieces made from repurposed materials – have been shown in Vancouver, Korea, Japan, Taiwan and the Republic of China.  He lives and works in TORONTO and VANCOUVER.You’ll find some of Andrew’s public photo-based works in the Spadina Avenue/Kensington Market area.

MASTER PRINT MAKER, DAVID BLACKWOOD’S GIFT TO THE ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO

242 works were given to the Art Gallery of Ontario in 1994 by the artist, DAVID BLACKWOOD, and his wife, ANITA.  Seventy of these, along with letters, photographs, nautical artifacts, flags and historic maps are all parts of the gift.  Blackwood, 78, is a Newfoundlander, now living in Ontario.A master printmaker, he portrays the mythology, people and culture of his hometown of Wesleyville and the outport, Bragg’s Island, in blue, gray, black and white – with sudden splashes of red, orange and yellow.David Blackwood’s collection of works draw on childhood memories, superstitions, dreams, legends, and the realities of life around Bonavista Bay.

‘THEY DIED WITH THEIR BOOTS ON’ – THE 100 WORKERS’ MONUMENT IN SIMCOE PARK

The 100 Workers Monument in Simcoe Park, Front Street West, consists of two long, low red granite walls.  On top are 100 bronze plaques, each naming a worker who died while on the job. There is one name for each year from 1901 until 1999. The plaque for the year 2000 is blank. 100 Workers is by John Scott & Stewart H. Pollock.  The second part of the monument, The Anonymity of Prevention, is a bronze sculpture of a worker wearing full safety gear, appearing to chisel into the wall of 100 Workers. This sculpture was done by Derek Lo and Lana Winkler.

REMEMBERING THE BILTMORE – A YONGE STREET FIXTURE FROM 1948 TO 1982

The BILTMORE, 319 Yonge Street, was one of three downtown cinemas known for showing double and triple bills for a modest admission price. The others were the Downtown and the Rio – all within a few metres of each other. The BILTMORE was constructed by the wealthy OKUN brothers, who’d made their fortune selling ladies hats under the Biltmore label.This flagship theatre had 916 seats, 300 in the balcony – and sat on land now occupied by a large shopping centre and a multiplex of 26 movie screens.<EXTERIOR PHOTOS – City of Toronto Archives>

SUMMER OF THE MOOSE/2000 – THANKS TO THEN-MAYOR MEL LASTMAN & CHARLES PACHTER

In the summer of 2000, then-Mayor Mel Lastman asked sculptor/painter Charles Pachter to design 326 moose sculptures.  He did.  With coupons  for paint and a long list of sponsors, the naked moose were painted up by TORONTO artists and distributed around the city (map above).  Some were awful; many were beautiful; a few still exist.  PHOTOS: Sherbourne Street (SimonP), Old City Hall, CN Tower mountie (MKuhn), New City Hall pool (Boldts.net)<And here’s a real moose – photographed crossing a northern Ontario road – by Bryan Blenkin/Alan Rowe>