WE’RE NOT USED TO THIS KIND OF PUBLICITY – BUT TORONTO PEARSON IS 2ND. FROM THE LOWEST

In a J.D. Power survey Toronto Pearson International Airport has ranked second-lowest among the 20 airports in the ‘mega’ category, which see at least 33 million passengers per year. J.D. Power, says Pearson fared relatively poorly because of facilities and pandemic policies. Michael Taylor, head of travel intelligence said “A lot of it had to do with COVID procedures, and some terminal facilities could be upgraded. It’s been a tough year.” <Photo above from blogTO>  In the second quarter of last year Pearson had only half a million passengers, compared with 12.8-million in 2019, the same period. The second quarter in 2021 saw about a million people pass through its terminals. <The Canadian Press, September 22, 2021>

SONG DONG’S ‘WISDOM OF THE POOR: COMMUNAL COURTYARD’ GIVEN TO THE ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO

This will take up serious storage space. It’s an “immersive” labyrinth of 100 Chinese doors assembled by Beijing avant-garde artist Song Dong (b.1966) – originally for the Venice Biennale – and now in the permanent collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario. The armoire doors were rescued from within the Beijing hutongs, a vast network of laneway housing either being demolished or gentrified, in a capital city that’s been expanding and rebuilding at breakneck speed. ‘The Wisdom of the Poor’ addresses the role of traditional architecture in today’s changing urban environment. <PHOTO – Song Dong, Pace Gallery>. <Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas Street West>

MASSEY COLLEGE IS A “PLACE OF DIGNITY, GRACE, BEAUTY AND WARMTH”

MASSEY COLLEGE, 4 Devonshire Place, is a well-connected and financially endowed institution in downtown Toronto. Designed by Canadian architect, Ron Thom, and opened in 1963 by Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, this is one of the University of Toronto’s most beautiful buildings.  The College was conceived by VINCENT MASSEY, 18th Governor-General of Canada, as a “place of dignity, grace, beauty and warmth”

THERE MAY SOON BE ANOTHER MAYORAL ELECTION ON MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2022

By the sound of it, our Mayor John Tory, incumbent since December 1, 2014, will be involved in another mayoral election, scheduled for Monday, October 24, 2022. Candidate registrations for the Office of Mayor officially opens on Monday, May 2, 2022.  Deadline for candidate nominations is Friday, August 19 at 2:00 pm. So this could mean Mr. Tory might take part in the election, or maybe he’d go back into full-time broadcasting. John Tory can definitely do either, but hasn’t been clear in interviews over this past year.For sure, Toronto’s ‘Rumour Mill’ will be spinning.  <Photo above – Mayor Tory on his first day in office at City Hall, December 1, 2014>

KENSINGTON MRKT. IS AN EAST VILLAGE, VENICE BOARDWALK AND WOODSTOCK ROLLED INTO ONE

Kensington Market is a National Historic Site and the locals fight hard to keep it that way. There are no big box stores. The multicultural neighbourhood occupies a large tract of land from College Street to the north, Spadina on the east, Dundas on the south and Bathurst Street to the west. The area is filled with food stores of every kind, a variety of upscale & downscale restaurants, nightclubs, coffee bars, vintage clothing shops, synagogues, and re-jigged architecture of every description.

IF YOU HAVEN’T NOTICED, YORKVILLE IS GOING HIGH-RISE AND MORE YOUTH-FUL.

Yorkville is evolving from low-rise to high, as new luxury condo buildings are rising onto the skyline. “In the last 10 years, I think the Four Seasons was the catalyst bringing Yorkville further east,” said Jared Menkes, executive vice-president, with Menkes Developments Ltd. He grew up in Toronto and no doubt remembers the days of beatniks, hippies, coffee houses, clubs and occasional raids by the police. Don Kottick, President and chief executive officer of Sotheby’s Canada said “Many of the new condominiums are now offered at prices starting from $8-million. Yorkville is truly one of Toronto’s flagship luxury neighbourhoods. <So, no doubt there are big changes in the neighborhood – The Globe and Mail.>