TWO RED PANDA CUBS ARRIVED AT TORONTO’S ZOO OVER A MONTH AGO. THEY’RE GROWING QUICKLY

    They’re being well looked after by the Zoo’s dedicated team.  The Keeper Team wrote “As the cubs gain weight and strength we remain optimistic.”The Red Panda mother gave birth to them in the afternoon of Tuesday, July 14th.This is the first Red Panda pregnancy at the Zoo since 1996, and it’s the first offspring for mother ILA with father SUVA. <PHOTO – An adult Red Panda>

FRIENDS WERE ENJOYING THEIR AFTERNOON COFFEE WHEN A STINK BUG SAT DOWN CLOSE BY

Fortunately Jo had her camera in hand, and took the above photo of Mr. Stink.  Jo’s partner, George, said “Stink Bugs are an invasive species and that’s one of them. It’s a bit smaller than my thumbnail. We get quite a few in our back yard and most of them are very small. Does it stink? Only if you squash it, which we didn’t.”When a Stink Bug invasion took place in TORONTO’s Annex over two years ago, Metro News columnist and resident of that neighbourhood, JOHANNA SCHNELLER, said: “They emit this really disgusting smell, like rotten leaves. It’s pungent, it lingers in the air.” SQUASHING ONE – Ms. Schneller didn’t think much of them until she squashed one.  Her disposal method – get a wad of paper towel, squish the bug (don’t open your hand), then swiftly flush it down the toilet.JO said – “Famous last words – I’m going to hit one of those to see what it smells like.”  DAVE said “It’s a flying skunk.”  ROSS said “Don’t flush paper towels down the toilet, Stink Bugs or no Stink Bugs.  It will clog your drains.  Toilet paper is best.”

TORONTO’S PRIDE BACK IN THE 1950’S WAS THE YONGE STREET SUBWAY – CANADA’S 1ST UNDERGROUND

<AN ORIGINAL Yonge Street Subway sign>WHY A SUBWAY? Rush hour traffic on Yonge Street, near College, November 18, 1941.TANGLE of public utility conduits and pipes, October 14, 1949 – because of the steel shortage caused by the Korean War (1950-53) most of the bridges were made from reinforced concrete. Even enforcing steel rods for the concrete were scarce. Rather than using Canadian suppliers the TTC was forced to buy more expensive steel from the United States & Britain.EXCAVATION for streetcar entrance on Bloor Street, east of Yonge, June 25, 1951.DAVISVILLE STATION looking south, November 24, 1953LAST STREETCAR ON YONGE STREET, on the afternoon the subway opened. LINEUP TO RIDE on the subway, opening day, March 30, 1954 – the public had to pay the fare, 10 cents cash, or three tickets or tokens for a quarter. Over 200,000 people rode the subway on that day.  <PHOTOS – Canada Pictures Limited & City of TORONTO Archives>

THERE’S COLOUR & MOVEMENT THIS WEEKEND AS YORKVILLE CELEBRATES MURALISM & PUBLIC ART

TORONTO’s Yorkville Murals is an annual three-day cultural event celebrating contemporary muralism and public art. A collection of artistic murals couldn’t be missed inside the courtyard at 99 Yorkville Avenue.There are panels, exhibits, and screenings transforming into an outdoor gallery all summer long.  Half of the artists are Canadian. This year’s event featured Djs, light shows, and live painting by two Montreal-based artists Mateo and Xray. Mixing big names like Los Angeles-based street artist, Mr. Brainwash, with local or up-and-coming talent is the cornerstone of the project. – CBC News.<ABOVE by JARUS/Yorkville Murals><ABOVE by Montreal-based OLA VOLO>

DESPITE COVID-19, CANADA’S PROPERTY MARKET NUMBERS ARE REACHING NEW HEIGHTS

From May onward property markets have been reeling in record prices and record sales. According to the Canadian Real Estate Association, the national home price index calculated a typical home sale at 3.3% to $637,600 from January to July. In Montreal the index rose 7.7% to $401,200 . . . . Ottawa jumped 9.4% to $502,500 . . . . in the Toronto Region it increased 4% to $876,100 . . . .  and in the Vancouver area $1,023,100.For renters with secure jobs, the situation is not dire. In tight markets such as TORONTO, supply is up and demand is down. A large number of new apartments and condos will soon be on the market, both in, and outside the city. – Report On Business, Globe and Mail, August 22/2020

ST. BASIL’S CHURCH, THE COLLEGIATE CHURCH OF SAINT MICHAEL’S COLLEGE, 1856

Best known to Torontonians as the church with the noontime bells, ST. BASIL’s was built in a neighbourhood once called CLOVERHILL.  The architect was a Scotsman – WILLIAM HAY.  In 1856 – this area was all open countryside, but today it’s filled with high-rise condos.As more buildings go up, the neighbourhood had been fighting to save a small park with mature trees at the corner of St. Joseph and Bay – and they’ve succeeded.