A TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSION RAIL GRINDING CAR, QUEEN STREET EAST, CA1950-65

The task of this early version of a rail grinder car was to make sure the streetcar tracks were smooth. This, and several later models were retired because they were not able to get up to speed in heavy traffic, and lighter machinery became available to do the job.

In September, 2002, the TTC removed grinders from their property, donating them to the Halton County Railway Museum. <PHOTO – City of Toronto Archives/Sidewalk Labs>

 

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THE PINK UMBRELLAS ARE MOVING NORTH AS SUGAR BEACH CONNECTS WITH CITY OF THE ARTS

The first phase of Daniels Waterfront – City of the Arts is now receiving tenants, and soon will join up with the popular Sugar Beach park.

The wedge-shaped Sugar Beach North will be on two levels, feature the park’s signature pink umbrellas, Muskoka chairs, and shade trees.  <PHOTO – skycandy/urbantoronto.ca>

Sugar Beach North will join up with a retail-lined pedestrian mews known as “The Yard” – between the office building and residential towers.

Daniels Waterfront is a mixed-use retail/office/institutional/residential complex on Queens Quay at Lower Jarvis Street, with towers as high as 45 storeys.

<RENDERING – Daniels Corporation>

IT’S COME TO THIS – CYCLISTS ARE USING POOL NOODLES TO KEEP CARS AT A SAFE DISTANCE

The noodles are soft, simple, harmless tubes that remind motorists to leave one-metre’s distance (about 3 feet) between the cyclist and the car.

“I was doored, closely passed and threatened a number of times,” wrote a cyclist on Twitter in May. “I now use a helmet camera, and soon, will be putting the pool noodle back on my bike. If they can’t give us 1 metre of passing distance (IT’S THE LAW!), they should lose the privilege to drive.”

SCARBOROUGH’S GUILD PARK & GARDENS DISPLAY ARCHITECTURAL RELICS FROM TORONTO’S PAST

<PHOTO – Ross Winter>

Never having been there before. I was totally surprised by the beauty of this Scarborough park, property of the TORONTO and Region Conservation Authority.

<The Greek Theatre was built from the remnants of a Bank of TORONTO; photo – SimonP.>

Located on the Scarborough Bluffs, this huge spread of grassy meadow is punctuated by large-scale relics from TORONTO’s past – mostly from the downtown Financial District. They were saved, beginning in the late 1950’s as the buildings themselves were being demolished.

<TORONTO Star Building, 80 King Street West, Chapman & Oxley Architects>

<The Osterhout Log Cabin, oldest building in Scarborough, commissioned in 1795 by John Graves Simcoe, First Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada>

<Carvings from the Bank of Nova Scotia, 39 King Street West, 1903-69>

The park is off Guildwood Parkway, east of Eglinton Avenue East and Kingston Road. Most of the area is forested and eventually leads to a ravine and Lake Ontario.

<ABOVE – the belfry of Victoria Park School>

TORONTO CITY COUNCIL’S TRUANCY LIST HAS BEEN COMPILED FOR THE 4-YEAR TERM ENDING IN 2018

<Upper left – Michelle Holland; lower left – Giorgio Mammoliti’s vacant chair; lower right – Mayor John Tory; PHOTO – Steve Russell, Toronto Star>

With a Municipal Election due on October 22nd, TORONTO City Council has released the numbers of those who skipped council meetings.
1. Giorgio Mammoliti (Ward 7, York West) – missed 48.7% of 1,048 votes in 2018
2. Michelle Holland (Ward 35, Scarborough Southwest) – missed 42.1% in 2018

Over four years, the same two councillors from the inner suburbs were also on top. Giorgio Mammoliti 43.1% & Michelle Holland 37% of 4,526 votes cast over 46 meetings.

Councillor Stephen Holyday (Ward 3 Etobicoke Centre) took the prize for missing no votes in 2018. Over four years, he missed only four.

SOME TORONTO RENTAL HOUSING NUMBERS – FROM NOW MAGAZINE, SEPTEMBER/2018

The current vacancy rate in TORONTO – 1% A healthy rental market would have a vacancy rate of 3 to 5%
$1,803 is the average rental fee for a one-bedroom apartment in the city.
47% of Torontonians are renters.
120 days is the advance notice required by a landlord to tenants for building renovations.
TORONTO renters spend more than 30% of their income on housing.
Mayor JOHN TORY is promising to build 40,000 additional rental units in the next 12 years.

IN PARIS THE URITROTTOIR (SIDEWALK URINAL) HAS BECOME THE LATEST ‘SCANDALE’

The City of Light has come up with a new design for public urinals – this time without significant sidings. They could be mistaken for post office boxes and are causing quite an uproar.

“In order for Uritrottoirs to be accepted by Parisians, we had to imagine equipment that doesn’t look like a urinal,” one of the product designers, Victor Massip, explained.

Beneath the bright red box sits a collection of straw, sawdust or wood chips. A sensor measures how much urine the box is holding at any given time. Once full, the lower box is taken to a composting site, from where mulched compost returns to feed the window-box that grows above the urine funnel.

L’Uritrottoir is yet another reason why we love PARIS!