F.Y.I. – THERE’S A CRUNCH IN TORONTO’S RENTAL MARKET – TOO MANY RENTERS, NOT ENOUGH UNITS

F.Y.I. (for your information) RBC (Royal Bank of Canada) Economics Report estimates that as of 2018 TORONTO had a deficit of 9,100 rental units, compared to 6,800 units in MONTREAL and 3,800 units in VANCOUVER. The rental market is considered balanced when the vacancy rate is 3%, but in TORONTO, the average is below 1%.“Rental supply is unlikely to come close to demand in TORONTO in the coming years. Due to the high cost of owning, we project the number of renter-households will increase by an average of 22,000 per year.” – RBC Economics Report

NOW, TORONTO’s WEEKLY, HAS PUBLISHED ‘ITS BEST OF EVERYTHING IN THE CITY’ PAGES

These are some of TORONTO’s recommended locales, chosen by NOW readers . . . BEST LIBRARY – Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street, http://www.tpl.ca
BEST PUBLIC SPACE – Toronto Island Park, http://www.toronto.ca
BEST SKATING RINK – Nathan Phillips Square, 100 Queen St. West, http://www.toronto.ca
RUNNER UP – The Bentway, 250 Fort York Boulevard, http://www.thebentway.ca
BEST FLEA & LOCAL MARKET – St. Lawrence Market, The Esplanade, http://www.sundayantiquemarket.com
BEST NEIGHBOURHOOD – Parkdale

SOME STYLISH MILLENNIALS HAVE TAKEN A LIKING TO ANTI-BABY-BOOMER CLOTHING – WHO KNEW?

Now we have a rift between generations on both sides of the Atlantic. Baby Boomers, born between 1946 & 1964, played outside, got spanked, respected their parents, didn’t punch the teacher, belonged to cadets, paid 50 cents for a haircut, 15 cents for a double-feature, tattoos were out, bubble gum was in, avoided the ‘f’ word, went to church, traded comics, played road hockey, etc. And many of us took early retirement because it was available.‘OK BOOMER – Have a Terrible Day’. “If they take that personally,” said a 17-year-old to the NY Times, “it’s just proof that Boomers take everything we do as offensive. It’s just funnier.”<CARTOON ABOVE – 30-year-old Boomer>  . . . . OK Boomer products available bed sheets, phone cases, stickers, pins, etc. They’re all over the internet.

ABOVE – “OK Boomer Have a terrible Day.”  A 20-year-old college student says “It’s funny you think I respect your opinion, when your hairline looks that disrespectful.” A 19-year-old designer: “We have a different perspective. A lot of Boomers don’t believe in climate change or that people can get jobs with dyed hair, and a lot of them are stubborn in that view.”

 

FILMORES’ SIGN IS A TORONTO INSTITUTION: “RIGHT THIS WAY, YOUR TABLE DANCE IS WAITING!”

<PHOTO – Laura-Lynn Petrick/flickr> . . . . . . JayneFinch writes:  “Everything in Filmores has been upgraded in renovations, BUT those original orange swag fringe chandeliers from the seventies remain static, permanent fixtures.  If lampshades could talk!”FILMORE’s, 212 Dundas Street East just goes on and on.  They have the best neon sign in town.And then, there are the ghosts and old cantakerous, dearly departed George, Jerry the manager, the accountant who ran off with the money from upstairs, Jason the DJ, the innocuous Panty-Man, and of course The Girls and Roxy, Foxy, Chantel, Tall Tess, Finish Sasha the contortionist, Georgina with her perpetually collapsing lung, Quinn, Ingrid, Felicity and Jayne Finch, Gemini, Rochelle, Sandy, Maude and her sister, Sweet Jane from the Island, Emmanuelle, Jeez-Louise, Caroline and . . . Where are they now?” . . . . . . http://www.torontothenotsogood.wordpress.comHundreds pass by every day and no doubt some of them are wondering what witty message will next appear on the marquee. FILMORE’S HOTEL & STRIP CLUB has found itself on TORONTO’s heritage roster of buildings worth preserving.  9,000 historic properties are on that list. This is a building with decorative brickwork, Edwardian-era styling and stone detailing according to the community council.  So it must be saved for that – and other reasons.

NOW, TORONTO’S WEEKLY MAGAZINE, HAS PUBLISHED ITS “BEST OF EVERYTHING IN THE CITY” LISTINGS

Can’t list them all, but for starters on the cover it’s PRIYANKA, the Best Drag Performer in TORONTO.The Food & Drink choices below were all chosen by NOW readers.
BEST AFRICAN RESTAURANT – Lalibela, 869 Bloor St. West, http://www.lalibelaethiopianrestaurant.com
BEST BARBECUE – Barque, 299 Roncesvalles Avenue, http://www.barque.ca
BEST BEER BAR – Bellwoods Brewery, 124 Ossington Av., http://www.bellwoodsbrewery.com
BEST BURGER – Burger’s Priest, various locations, http://www.theburgerspriest.com
BEST CAESAR COCKTAIL – Drake Hotel, 1150 Queen W., 150 York, http://wwwthedrak.ca
BEST CAFE – Rooster Coffee House, various locations, http://www.roostercoffeehouse.com
BEST CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT – The Big Jerk, 842 Gerrard E., 1004 Kingston Rd.
BEST DUMPLINGS – Mother’s Dumplings, 421 Spadina, http://www.mothersdumpings.com
BEST. DINER – The Lakeview, 24 hrs., 1132 Dundas W., http://www.thelakeviewrestaurant.ca
BEST KOREAN RESTAURANT – KOREAN GRILL HOUSE, various locations, koreangrillhouse.com
BEST STEAKHOUSE – Barberian’s, 7 Elm Street, http://www.barberians.com

FRENCH ACTOR, JACQUES TATI, FORESAW THE FUTURE IN HIS 1967 COMEDY MASTERPIECE ‘PLAYTIME’

Given the forest of high-rise office & condo buildings in downtown TORONTO, ‘Playtime’ seems like an appropriate copy.  It’s set partly in a PARIS glass and steel office building.Jacques Tati (playing Monsieur Hulot) arrives for an important meeting, but gets lost in a maze of rooms, ending up in a trade exhibition of lookalike office designs and furniture.The old Paris touch is a brief reflection of the Eiffel Tower in a glass window. A heritage structure if there ever was one.  ‘Playtime’ is a wonderful film.  <ABOVE – living in a grid of television screensHeavy traffic BELOW>

70-HOUR WORKWEEKS, 4 – 5 AM START – COSTUME SUPERVISOR AMANDA WOOD LOVES HER JOB IN TV

The life AMANDA WOOD dreamed of as a child was having a career in theatre costuming, and this she did along with working as make-up artist and wardrobe assistant in small-town theatre, indie film and music videos before breaking into Canadian television. That’s where she is today, presently working on the CBC’s hit comedy ‘Schitt’s Creek”, which will soon be televising its final season.“Being hired on a show with such a big following and well-known cast was intimidating,” she admits, “but soon you realize they’re just normal people doing their jobs. I will definitely miss the costumes, but I will miss the cast the most.” <From The York University Magazine; story by LINDSAY MACADAM; photography by MIKE FORD>