ON NIGHTS WHEN THE CORONAVIRUS STALKS THE STREETS, THE CN TOWER KEEPS THE LIGHTS ON

<The CN TOWER is closed for the time being due to (not surprisingly) the COVID-19 pandemic. Plans are to re-open on Tuesday, April 14th.>

AMERICAN & CANADIAN CARS IN THE 1950’S WERE STYLISH WORKS OF ART & ROMANCE SOLD THEM

<PONTIAC – Pathfinder Deluxe, made in Canada, advertisement in the Saturday Eveniing Post, 1950><METEOR – Canadian car advertisement, 1950’s><NASH EXHIBIT, Canadian National Exhibition, TORONTO, 1938.  A special feature – you could sleep in it anywhere.><DESOTO CUSTOM – ‘Drive without shifting’, Canadian advertisement><MONARCH, ‘Canada’s own car of distinction’promotional image, 1956><METEOR CONVERTIBLE, rare Canadian>

QUOTES FROM TWO UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO STUDENTS WHO’VE TRADED RURAL FOR URBAN

THOMAS WILDEBOER, from Grand Valley, Ontario, population 3,000, is a first year student studying physical and mathematical sciences – “Many people who live in rural areas have a lot of bad ideas about city living but the adjustment really isn’t difficult,” he wrote. “I started to feel at home pretty quickly. Your walking distance is away from a lot of stuff, but the TTC can get you places. If all else fails, Uber is an option. In rural areas, driving for hours to run errands is common.” Wildeboer has found that one of the best things about living in the city is fast internet. <DINA DONG/THE VARSITY; JUSTIN TUNG/FLICKR>DEAN HILER, a third year student, is studying earth systems, geographic information systems, and history and philosophy of science. “I’m from Watervliet, Michigan, which is a town of about 1,600 people (and falling). Diversity adds this intangible quality to life that is often indirect and minor, but because it affects everything, it’s actually a huge part of your life and you don’t realize you were missing it or value it until you have it,” he wrote. “The perspective I get from being enveloped in (Toronto’s) diversity has allowed me to redefine myself using a much larger dictionary.” <PHOTO – SAMANTHA YAO/THE VARSITY; DINA DONG/THE VARSITY>

A RESEARCH TEAM FROM TORONTO & HAMILTON HAVE ISOLATED THE AGENT FOR THE COVID-19 OUTBREAK

Thanks to collaboration among researchers from Toronto’s Sunnybrook Hospital, McMaster University in Hamilton and the University of Toronto the agent responsible for the outbreak of COVID-19 has been isolated. The team was able to culture the virus from two clinical specimens in a Level 3 containment facility. <PICTURED ABOVE – left to right, Dr. Robert Kozak, Dr. Samira Mubareka, Dr. Arinjay Banerjee>“We need key tools to develop solutions to this pandemic. While the immediate response is crucial, longer-term solutions come from essential research into this novel virus,” said Dr. Samira Mubareka, microbiologist and infectious diseases physician at Sunnybrook. “Researchers from these world-class institutions came together in a grassroots way to successfully isolate the virus in just a few short weeks,” said Dr. Rob Kozak, clinical microbiologist at Sunnybrook. “It demonstrates the amazing things that can happen when we collaborate.  Now that we have isolated the SARS-CoV-2 virus, we can share this with other researchers and continue this teamwork,” he said.

Robert Kozak and Samira Mubareka are part of a local working group of scientists researching the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak and developing a suite of tools to control it (photo by Nick Iwanyshyn)  “The more viruses that are made available in this way, the more we can learn, collaborate and share.”  Many thanks to Canada’s NATIONAL HEALTH.

 

F.Y.I. – IN 2018 THE MOVIE BUSINESS DEPOSITED NEARLY $2-BILLION INTO TORONTO’S ECONOMY

FOR YOUR INFORMATION – In 2018 according to the City of TORONTO, production investments in film, television, digital and commercials dropped $1.9-billion into the economy. 1,412 projects were shot in the city, and 30,000 jobs were supported by the industry. – Globe and Mail, March 14/2020.

THEY’RE TINY, THEY’RE YAPPY, AND MANY ARE LIVING IN DOWNTOWN’S SMALL GLASS BOXES

The condominium boom has brought with it more than 21,000 toy dogs, and the numbers are still going up.Ranging from under six pounds – the smallest Chihuahuas – to 20 pound Pugs, the little ones have taken over. They’re popular In TORONTO.  Smooth-coated Chihuahuas jumped from 192 in 2005 to over 1,300 in 2020 according to municipal license data.Pomeraneans that fit inside purses went from 258 to nearly 900.Downtown TORONTO has become a city of condos, squeezing people into small units, with little room for Great Danes or even Golden Labs. Inside those glass boxes, many tiny dogs are stuck. Their owners have discovered litter boxes and ‘pee pads’, which means the pups don’t often get outside.Small dogs enjoy the sun and dirt as much as the big ones. They want to be social, and for some reason do a lot of barking when they meet big dogs, who oftentimes totally ignore them. It’s not so easy being tiny.