TORONTO’S ROYAL CINEMA TURNS BACK THE CLOCK WITH “HAIR” & “SHAMPOO” ON JANUARY 28 & 29

“HAIR” and “SHAMPOO”, two classic films from the 1970’s, have been re-coloured and restored, and the Royal Cinema, 608 College Street, will be showing the two of them on its big screen come January 28th and 29th.

BLOUIN Art Info – “maybe 4 decades have gone by, but “Hair” seems to be a story as fresh as it was when first released. The 1979 anti-war drama film was based on the 1968 Broadway musical “Hair: An American Tribal Love-Rock Musical”.

The musical, complete with a controversial nude scene, played at TORONTO’s Royal Alexandra Theatre for more than a record-breaking year.

“SHAMPOO” is a 1975 satirical comedy-drama film directed by Hal Ashby and written by Robert Towne and Warren Beatty. It stars Warren Beatty, Goldie Hawn, Julie Christie, Lee Grant, Jack Warden, Tony Bill, and Carrie Fisher who debuted with this film.

ROYAL CINEMA, documentaries, festivals, foreign, second-run features, 608 College Street, http://www.theroyal.to

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CANADA’S HOUSE OF COMMONS AND SENATE ARE MOVING INTO NEW DIGS FOR THE NEXT 12 + YEARS

<PHOTO – carpeting design for the temporary Senate chamber>

Probably it will take longer than a dozen years, but Canada’s Senators and Members of Parliament have left behind their home in the Centre Block and are in the process of moving. While they’re gone, the Centre Block will be refurbished, cleaned, and restored.

The temporary Senate chamber, all in red <ABOVE>, will be across Wellington Street from Parliament Hill. Once it was OTTAWA’s beaux-arts railway station, then a government conference centre, and now an elaborate home for the 105 members of the Upper House of Parliament.

The temporary House of Commons is a glass-and-steel addition within the courtyard of the West Block on Parliament Hill. It was designed by MONTREAL firms ARCOP and EVOQ. The glass ceiling will capture heat in the winter and expel it in the summer.

Underground levels include a welcome centre where visitors will go through security screening before entering. Parliament is one of Canada’s top tourism sites and despite the move, tourists will still be able to visit it.

<PHOTO – THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang>

FOUNDED IN 1991, CINECYCLE KEEPS GOING, DEVOTED TO BIKE REPAIRS, COFFEE AND FILM

This sign once marked the entranceway to CINECYCLE’s first location, from 1991 to 1995, behind 217 Spadina Avenue. The bicycle was built by Leo Stonetsky using 16mm film reels for the wheels, and the photo was taken by John Porter.

CINECYCLE’s founder and director, MARTIN HEATH, is the recipient of the Tom Berner Award for “providing extraordinary support to the cause of independent film making in TORONTO.” A former print maker, film handler and projectionist, Martin is a longtime supporter of the city’s music scene.

Martin’s personal projects have included a 100-minute film “The Son of Tutti Frutti” which played weekly at TORONTO’s Roxy Cinema in 1972; an inflatable Mobile Cinema which toured Ontario for 3 summers (1976-1978); and his collection of 2,000 films and 50 projectors.

Through the years, CineCycle’s coach house address, behind 129 Spadina Avenue, was once a stable, home to a fine fur company, and a sweat shop.  The “work to rule” graffiti is from a worker’s action that took place here in the 1930’s.

Bike repairs are by appointment; films are screened on an irregular schedule 

For a fascinating history of CINECYCLE and its founder, as well as a screening schedule go to http://www.super8porter.ca/CineCycle.htm

VERY MUCH A DOWNTOWN UNIVERSITY, RYERSON IS PLANNING YET ANOTHER TOWER

<IMAGE – an aerial rendering showing the 202 Jarvis neighbourhood; City of TORONTO>

Over the past few years RYERSON UNIVERSITY has been building and rebuilding a number of architecturally significant additions to its downtown core campus.

The latest – and possibly last because of a land squeeze – will be a 41-storey tower designed by Copenhagen-based Henning Larsen Architects & TORONTO’s Zeidler Partnership Architects. The address, if approved, will be 202 Jarvis Street.

PHOTO ABOVE by steveve – another of Ryerson University’s projects is the Centre for Urban Innovation, still under construction.

The Centre combines old and new structures fronting on residential McGill Street and Gerrard Street East. The designers – Moriyama and Teshima Architects.

PHOTO ABOVE was taken by Craig White in 2018. It’s an aerial view of the 27-storey Daphne Cockwell Health Sciences Complex under construction on Church Street, north of Dundas.

Among its features – an 8th floor green roof, which will triple the Ryerson Urban Farm’s yield of vegetables; a much-needed student residence expected to be finished by March/2019, with accommodation for 332; podium levels dedicated to nursing, nutrition, midwifery, occupational and public health.

ZAYELL JOHNSTON’S “CRAZY NOTION” – TO WALK 9,000 KILOMETRES (5,600 MILES) ACROSS CANADA

To walk coast-to-coast across CANADA, even in perfect weather, is a gargantuan task. ZAYELL JOHNSTON, 27, decided to do precisely that, beginning his project at Mile ‘O’ in VICTORIA, British Columbia, and ending up nine months later on the Atlantic coast in CAPE SPEAR, Newfoundland. Along the way – blistering heat, torrential rain, blizzards and hail; daily walking average – 50 kilometres.

“I don’t know how I got the crazy notion of walking across the country, but I didn’t want to drive across it,” Johnston said. “At the beginning of the journey, you could say I was running away to kind of reflect on where I was in life.”

Johnston set up a Go Fund Me campaign and raised only $620. At the end of the trip he used the fund to send cheques of roughly $50 each to the Canadian Mental Health Association in all ten provinces.

His next goal – paying off a student loan, becoming a forest firefighter and building up his abs. ZAYELL is a native of YORKTON, Saskatchewan.

<CBC News, @BonnieAllenCBC; photos by Zayell Johnston/Facebook>