HIS NAME IS EVERYWHERE – ALL ACROSS CANADA, IN MEXICO, THE UNITED STATES & ELSEWHERE

Without question he’s one of the most famous Canadians ever.MILES GILBERT “TIM” HORTON (1930-74) was born in Cochrane, Ontario and played 22 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the TORONTO Maple Leafs, New York Rangers, Pittsburgh Penguins and Buffalo Sabres.<PHOTO ABOVE – the first restaurant to bear Tim Horton’s name opened in NORTH BAY, Ontario, It sold hamburgers instead of doughnuts.Today there are around 4,800 Tim Hortons coffee houses in Canada and the United States – more than 80 in Buffalo alone. There’s at least one outlet in almost every Canadian village, town and city, as well as in every rest stop along Ontario’s 401 Highway.The first TIM HORTONS doughnut shop opened in HAMILTON, Ontario in 1964. A plaque marks its former location, and not surprisingly there’s a new Tim’s on-site.Outlets in the Phlippines, Thailand, the United Kingdom, Spain and China are in planning or building stages. The idea is to increase the number of outlets to over 40,000 worldwide.  Tim’s is now under the wing of an American company, but its headquarters remain in Ontario.At 4 a.m. on February 21, 1974 Horton, who was speeding to BUFFALO from TORONTO on the Queen Elizabeth Way, lost control of his sportscar, hit a concrete culvert, was thrown onto the road, and arrived dead at a local hospital, At the time of his death there were about 50 restaurants open or in development.<PHOTO ABOVE – Hockey Hall of Fame, TORONTO>

Advertisements

SHEA’S HIPPODROME AT QUEEN & BAY WAS ONCE CANADA’S LARGEST THEATRE – IT’S GONE FOR GOOD

SHEA’S HIPPODROME, opened on April 27, 1914 on what is now Nathan Phillips Square. It was the largest theatre in Canada, with over 3,000 seats. Silent movies were on the bill, along with a 24-piece orchestra.In 1926 a magnificent $50,000 Wurlitzer organ was installed. It would rise from the lowest part of the orchestra pit to the stage. The theatre closed on December 27, 1957 to make way for a new city hall. The organ was re-installed in Maple Leaf Gardens.<SHEA’S HIPPODROME with a sign promoting Elvis Presley’s new movie ‘LOVE ME TENDER’.  The film opened in November, 1956.>  ABOVE PHOTOS – City of Toronto Archive; Toronto Public Library & Historic Toronto.

THE ELGIN & WINTER GARDEN THEATRES ARE OVER 100 YEARS OLD & YOU CAN VISIT

One sits on top of the other.  On the bottom – the resplendent ELGIN, and on top – the WINTER GARDEN, with its pastel lamps and leafy bowers.  These are the last remaining double-decker Edwardian-era theatres in the world. 189 Yonge Street, above Queen.<PHOTOS ABOVE – The Elgin><PHOTO ABOVE – The Winter Garden>  This National Historic Site offers year-round tours – Thursdays at 5pm & Saturdays at 11am.  Adults $12; students and seniors $10. Cash only. No reservations required. Tours include samples from the vaudeville scenery collection, the Winter Garden’s original Simplex Silent Film Projector and a vaudeville-era dressing room.  Ontario Heritage Trust website – http://www.heritagetrust.on.ca

LARGEST COLLECTION OF CARIBBEAN PHOTOGRAPHY – 3,500 IMAGES – ACQUIRED BY TORONTO’S A.G.O.

<J.W. Cleary, Coconut Palms, Kingston Harbour, c. 1895>  NEW YORK’s Patrick Montgomery assembled over ten years a huge collection of historical photos from the Caribbean.<Valentine & Sons, A Boat on Kingston Harbour (variation), 1891>  Montgomery says “I was surprised how few (local historical societies) had photo collections…. So I started poking around and talking to dealers, and it turns out they did exist, but not in the Caribbean. The climate and economy [largely] didn’t support that kind of archive.”<Unknown photographer, Glendairy Prison Officials, Barbados, 1909> Thanks to $300,000 in support mainly from TORONTO’s Caribbean and Black community donors, the unique collection is now in the archives of the Art Gallery of Ontario.<Felix Morin, Coolie Woman, Trinidad, c. 1890><Felix Morin, Bananas, Trinidad, c. 1890>  The collection is distinctive in its reach, covering no fewer than 34 countries from 1840 through to 1940. (Canadian Art Magazine, June/2019)

THERE ONCE WAS AN ESTABLISHMENT CALLED THE VARIETY HOTEL NEAR TORONTO CITY HALL

<The VARIETY HOTEL, with its vitrolite facade, was one of several small hotels in the Queen/Chestnut neighbourhood. The Alexandra at 102 Queen & the Municipal at 67 Queen Street were close by.  They all provided basic rooms at reasonable prices. Photo – Jones & Morris, 1956><Main floor of the ladies’ beverage room in the VARIETY HOTEL, 1956. Photo – Jones & Morris><A basic hotel room, 1956;  Photo – Jones & Morris>  The VARIETY was located at 112-114 Queen Street West.  It was typical of several hotels in the vicinity of city hall.

HIGH WINDS & WAVES ARE SUBMERGING PARTS OF THE TORONTO ISLANDS INTO LAKE ONTARIO

Since 2017, flooding of TORONTO’s archipelago of 15 islands has been of great concern to the Toronto Region Conservation Authority (TRCA). In the future, there could be new beaches and bridges, with raised barriers (or berms), elevation of low-lying roads, increased shore protection structures, and re-routed surface drainage to already installed sump pumps.PHOTOS taken by BRYAN BLENKIN on July 25/2019.

IN THIS 1930 PHOTO BY WILLIAM JAMES, OLD CITY HALL’S CLOCK TOWER STANDS OUT

<The cluster of structures behind city hall are the T. Eaton Company’s factory buildings where goods for Eaton department stores were manufactured. On the left you can see early parking lots that replaced demolished buildings. Photo by William James, City of Toronto Archives>