FILMORES’ SIGN IS A TORONTO INSTITUTION: “RIGHT THIS WAY, YOUR TABLE DANCE IS WAITING!”

<PHOTO – Laura-Lynn Petrick/flickr> . . . . . . JayneFinch writes:  “Everything in Filmores has been upgraded in renovations, BUT those original orange swag fringe chandeliers from the seventies remain static, permanent fixtures.  If lampshades could talk!”FILMORE’s, 212 Dundas Street East just goes on and on.  They have the best neon sign in town.And then, there are the ghosts and old cantakerous, dearly departed George, Jerry the manager, the accountant who ran off with the money from upstairs, Jason the DJ, the innocuous Panty-Man, and of course The Girls and Roxy, Foxy, Chantel, Tall Tess, Finish Sasha the contortionist, Georgina with her perpetually collapsing lung, Quinn, Ingrid, Felicity and Jayne Finch, Gemini, Rochelle, Sandy, Maude and her sister, Sweet Jane from the Island, Emmanuelle, Jeez-Louise, Caroline and . . . Where are they now?” . . . . . . http://www.torontothenotsogood.wordpress.comHundreds pass by every day and no doubt some of them are wondering what witty message will next appear on the marquee. FILMORE’S HOTEL & STRIP CLUB has found itself on TORONTO’s heritage roster of buildings worth preserving.  9,000 historic properties are on that list. This is a building with decorative brickwork, Edwardian-era styling and stone detailing according to the community council.  So it must be saved for that – and other reasons.

70-HOUR WORKWEEKS, 4 – 5 AM START – COSTUME SUPERVISOR AMANDA WOOD LOVES HER JOB IN TV

The life AMANDA WOOD dreamed of as a child was having a career in theatre costuming, and this she did along with working as make-up artist and wardrobe assistant in small-town theatre, indie film and music videos before breaking into Canadian television. That’s where she is today, presently working on the CBC’s hit comedy ‘Schitt’s Creek”, which will soon be televising its final season.“Being hired on a show with such a big following and well-known cast was intimidating,” she admits, “but soon you realize they’re just normal people doing their jobs. I will definitely miss the costumes, but I will miss the cast the most.” <From The York University Magazine; story by LINDSAY MACADAM; photography by MIKE FORD>

IN BOTH CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES BILLIONS OF BIRDS ARE DISAPPEARING

“The skies are emptying out,” says the New York Times. Bird numbers are down by nearly three billion over the last 50 years, and it isn’t only exotic and rare birds that are disappearing. Many common species are going too.TORONTO’s buildings are killing millions of them annually due to fatal light awareness. In other words, they collide with our city’s skyscraper forest.Every spring and fall, day and night, hundreds of thousands of birds overfly the city, to and from the southland.  Unobstructed until they reach Greater Toronto, these tiny spirits are suddenly confronted by hundreds of buildings – some 70-80 storeys high, and oftentimes illuminated. Millions annually plummet to their deaths from these structures.<ABOVE – the four North American bird flyways.  TORONTO is in the Atlantic Flyway>FLAP (or the Fatal Light Awareness Program) is TORONTO-based.  It’s been valiantly fighting to save the birds, and is having some success.  Through research, education, rescue, rehabilitation, and now the courts, FLAP is challenging developers to be much more environmentally friendly.In an earlier New York Times article, “Toronto Looks to Save Casualties of Urban Skies”, October 28/2012,  Ian Austen writes: “There is no precise ranking of the world’s most deadly cities for migratory birds, but TORONTO is considered a top contender for the title . . . (Professor Daniel Klem Jr., an ornothologist at Muhlenberg College in Allentown Pa.) was quick to say that the city also leads North America when it comes to addressing the problem.FLAP volunteers rise before dawn every day, and head out carrying butterfly nets and paper bags.  They rescue injured birds before the city wakes up for another day. The dead are wrapped in paper, and taken to FLAP headquarters.  The injured are treated, and later released on the shores of Lake Ontario.  More than 164 species have collided with Greater TORONTO’s buildings in the last 15 years.<ABOVE – an injured Ovenbird being treated.  It will eventually be released.>  To find out more about TORONTO’s Fatal Light Awareness Program (or FLAP), call 416-366-3527 or check their website – https://flap.org/  Volunteers and contributions are always welcome.  <PHOTOS –SARA SCHARF & J.P. Moczulski>

A NEW LOCATION FOR ‘DANCE COLLECTION DANSE’ – #1303, 2 CARLTON ST., DOWNTOWN TORONTO

It may not be the largest gallery/archives/museum in town, but DANCE COLLECTION DANSE, 2 Carlton Street at Yonge (#1303) has a devoted following both online and on-site. Founded in 1986, the national archive and publisher is dedicated to the preservation of Canada’s theatrical dance history.  Programming combines collection, exhibition, preservation, research, publishing and education. Website: http://www.dcd.ca PHOTO ABOVE – Jean Grand-Maître, Artistic Director, Alberta Ballet with Swan Lake dancers (2012) had this to say: “Dance Collection Danse’s efforts to preserve and archive the vibrant and ground breaking legacy of Canada’s internationally acclaimed artists is as important to our culture as the creators’ repertoire. I applaud them for their valiant efforts and for being such excellent caretakers of an often neglected art form.”Justin Trudeau, Canada’s Prime Minister, and his younger brother Sacha, try out the Nutcracker sleigh, surrounded by the National Ballet’s Artistic Director Alexander Grand and Principal Dancer Nadia Potts.Detail from The Nutcracker backdrop, painted in the late 1940’sCostume sketches from the Charlottetown Festival by Frances DafoeJury Gotshalks & Irene Apinee, Swan Lake, 1951HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10-4 or by appointment.

YONGE STREET SHOP WINDOWS – APRIL, 1954 & 1981 – CITY OF TORONTO ARCHIVES/SIDEWALK LABS

<“Gone With The Wind’, SEVAN GALLERY, Yonge Street, south of Gerrard, photo by Harvey R. Naylor, April 20, 1981>

<‘EXAMINATION’, a rather severe optometrist’s shop front, 298 Yonge Street, April 8, 1954><GABRIEL’S BARBER SHOP & SHOE SHINE, 409 Yonge Street, April 7, 1954>

TORONTO REBUILDS ITSELF – WITH SCAFFOLDINGS, DEMOLITIONS, TRAFFIC JAMS & CRANES EVERYWHERE

It’s a great opportunity for those with a camera, and without a car. There are photographic opportunities around almost every corner. With 103 construction cranes now at work, buildings are going up and coming down amazingly fast.The cityscape is evolving. A good case can be made for either liking it or lumping it.  Walking is one of the best ways to take in these rapid changes.  The good news is that many heritage buildings are being passed over – or at least their facades are being saved.  Take your bike out on a Sunday morning and be prepared for a surprise.

CANADIAN IMPRESSIONIST ART DOES INDEED EXIST AND SOME OF IT’S ON TOUR IN EUROPE

Kunsthalle München, Kanada, Kanada und der Expressionismus, Vernissage, 18.7.2019.  The National Gallery of Canada is opening some eyes in MUNICH, as ‘Canada and Impressionism: New Horizons, 1880-1930’ has been installed at the Kunsthalle Munchen. Curiosity has led to lineups. < ABOVE – Lineup on  opening night, Kunsthalle Munich, photo – ‘Canadian Art’ magazine>

<Laura Muntz, ‘The Pink Dress’, 1897, oil on canvas, private collection, TorontoThe National Gallery’s Senior Curator, KATERINA ATANASSOVA, said: “To me, this period is the most important period in the history of Canadian art.”<ABOVE – Clarence Gagnon, ‘Old Houses’, Baie-Saint-Paul, 1912, oil on canvas, private collection, Toronto>  Ms. Atanassaova said the Canadian style of Impressionism is different because of our northern climate. The light of Canada differs from the light one would find in a warm Mediterranean climate. Also, Canadian artists often had to work very quickly, because their fingers were in danger of freezing if they didn’t.<ABOVE – Helen McNicoll, ‘Sunny September’, 1913, oil on canvas, private collection, Toronto>  For the record – more than a thousand attended on opening night. ‘Canadian Impressionism’ will be on display in Munich until November 19th. Then it moves on to Lausanne, Switzerland, and from there to Montpellier, France. In the fall of 2020 the tour will come to an end at home base in Ottawa – then we’ll get to see it.