A STRIKING MURAL BY GERMANY’S JUSTUS BECKER HAS TAKEN ITS PLACE ON CHARLES ST. EAST

JUSTUS BECKER, Germany’s famous street artist, has brightened up a newly renovated Green P parking garage, just off Yonge Street. It’s hard to miss. The painting will be the first between Frankfurt and Toronto muralsts.This Mural Exchange Project celebrates the 30-year relationship between the two cities, whose landscapes appear in the reflected glasses (Frankfurt on the left; Toronto on the right).  A TORONTO street artist will collaborate by painting a mural in Frankfurt with a similar theme.

QUEEN ELIZABETH II, 33, & PRINCE PHILIP UNDERTOOK A 1959 CROSS-COUNTRY TOUR OF CANADA

H.M.Y. (Her Majesty’s Yacht) ‘Britannia’ docked on June 29,1959, delivering the Queen and Prince Philip to TORONTO. They were in the process of visiting the Maritimes and Quebec after their landing in Gander, Newfoundland on June 18th. This was to be an extensive Royal Tour.The Queen and her Prince carried on regardless around the Great Lakes, parts of the United States, including the Detroit River, the Prairies and the West Coast. Inside the Harbour, the royal couple were welcomed with a 21-gun salute, a ceremoniously decorated Lake and several ocean liners, and the thundering cheers of Canadian sailors.During their two days in Ontario’s capital city, they stopped at City Hall for a ceremony, had dinner at the Royal York Hotel, visited the O’Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts, and took in the 100th running of the Queen’s Plate. Along the way, they waved and met many Canucks from coast-to-coast, and a good number of Americans too. Eventually they were off from Malton Airport (now Pearson International) for Ottawa, and then to Halifax, Nova Scotia. After that, the famous couple left the country on August 1, 1959, bound for London. They’ve visited us many times since.<Queen Elizabeth iI and Prince Philip as they were on June 10, 2016>

SOME GOOD NEWS FOR TORONTO TRANSIT FROM THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO

The TTC has been soldiering on despite the nastiness of COVID-19 in Canada’s largest city. You can still get from here to there via buses, streetcars and the subway. Premier Doug Ford has announced that the province will be giving up to $1.6-billion to municipalities to help public transit get through financial shortcomings. $400-million, a first phase of funding of that payout, will go to the Toronto Transit Commission. <Photo – Urban Toronto>It’s estimated that the TTC will still be short $700-million by the end of the year. Associate Minister of Transport for the Greater Toronto Area said “This additional funding will keep municipal transit systems running and will help keep trains, buses, and stations safe so people can feel confident in choosing public transit as they go back to work.”

THE PSYCHOLOGICAL STATE OF WAITING FOR TAKEOFF – IN “PASSENGERS” BY JOHN SCHABEL

These days we’d all probably be wearing masks. In the 1990’s JOHN SCHABEL set up his camera, equipped with a telephoto lens, on overpasses near New York’s airports.  Peering into the cabin windows of aircraft awaiting takeoff, he found miniature studies of human beings about to be catapulted into space.  We’ve all been there.

BEATRICE WHITE, FLY-SWATTING CHAMP, LIVED IN TORONTO & WHACKED 500,000 FLIES ONE SUMMER

From the Cabbagetown Regent Park Museum – In August 1912, BEA WHITE of Regent Street, spent several weeks whacking or trapping flies, ridding her neighbourhood of the pests. She earned $50 (about $1250 now) for her efforts.Why target the fly? To call attention to the unsanitary conditions that caused sickness and death in TORONTO’s overcrowded inner city. And why so many flies? Blame it on the horse.  In this pre-automobile era horses produced piles of manure, perfect for breeding the “queen of the dung hill”. The contest was halted when organizers discovered some competitors were breeding flies to be killed. <IMAGES – City of TORONTO Archives>

‘BETWEEN THE EYES’ BY RICHARD DEACON, IS ON TORONTO’S WATERFRONT. YOU CAN’T MISS IT.

Richard Deacon, a London sculptor who does extraordinary things with extraordinary things.  There’s a huge Deacon sculpture in our city, near Lake Ontario, at the corner of Queen’s Quay East and Yonge Street.   Says Mr. Deacon: “I learned how to do technical drawing for public commissions like ‘Between the Eyes’, 1990 for Queen’s Quay in Toronto, but computing has changed all that.  Now you can make a model, scan it, and produce the sculpture in a factory.”