THE PSYCHOLOGICAL STATE OF WAITING FOR TAKEOFF – IN “PASSENGERS” BY JOHN SCHABEL

These days we’d all probably be wearing masks. In the 1990’s JOHN SCHABEL set up his camera, equipped with a telephoto lens, on overpasses near New York’s airports.  Peering into the cabin windows of aircraft awaiting takeoff, he found miniature studies of human beings about to be catapulted into space.  We’ve all been there.

BEATRICE WHITE, FLY-SWATTING CHAMP, LIVED IN TORONTO & WHACKED 500,000 FLIES ONE SUMMER

From the Cabbagetown Regent Park Museum – In August 1912, BEA WHITE of Regent Street, spent several weeks whacking or trapping flies, ridding her neighbourhood of the pests. She earned $50 (about $1250 now) for her efforts.Why target the fly? To call attention to the unsanitary conditions that caused sickness and death in TORONTO’s overcrowded inner city. And why so many flies? Blame it on the horse.  In this pre-automobile era horses produced piles of manure, perfect for breeding the “queen of the dung hill”. The contest was halted when organizers discovered some competitors were breeding flies to be killed. <IMAGES – City of TORONTO Archives>

‘BETWEEN THE EYES’ BY RICHARD DEACON, IS ON TORONTO’S WATERFRONT. YOU CAN’T MISS IT.

Richard Deacon, a London sculptor who does extraordinary things with extraordinary things.  There’s a huge Deacon sculpture in our city, near Lake Ontario, at the corner of Queen’s Quay East and Yonge Street.   Says Mr. Deacon: “I learned how to do technical drawing for public commissions like ‘Between the Eyes’, 1990 for Queen’s Quay in Toronto, but computing has changed all that.  Now you can make a model, scan it, and produce the sculpture in a factory.”

TOM POWER, HOST OF CBC RADIO’S ‘Q’ PROGRAM HAS TAKEN UP RUNNING AND SEEMS TO LIKE IT

Native Newfoundlander, TOM POWER, is now a runner. He spoke about this to Gayle MacDonald of the Globe and Mail. “It’s a shock to my family and friends, but I’ve started running. I’m doing it out of sheer anxiety about my immune system. The life of a radio host isn’t the healthiest. We sit all the time, and I love chips. I run in the bike lane, facing away so I can see if bikes are coming and jump back if need be. I’ve been seeing alleys and streets around my neighborhood that I’ve never seen before, all because I want to be respectful and stay away from people.” <PHOTO – Toronto Star>

SOME DOWNTOWN RESIDENTS ARE COMMUNICATING WITH EACH OTHER ON ‘NEXT DOOR DIGEST’

It’s a great idea and it’s catching on. For several months now downtowners have been chatting back and forth about what’s going on in their neighbourhoods. One idea in this time of self-quarantining, is taking pictures of pets and showing them. <ABOVE – ALFIE><ABOVE – LEOPOLD><ABOVE – FRANKIE, whose owner writes “He’s patient at home, but a bit bored.”><ABOVE – WAFFLES, whose owner writes: “She’s enjoying everyone being home. Trained the whole house to get up and give her a cookie, no matter what room they’re in.”>   For more information and to join up with the neighbours check out ‘NEXT DOOR  DIGEST’ – https://ca.nextdoor.com/

TORONTO HAS PUBLISHED TWO MORE CULTURAL LOOPS GUIDES – THE LATEST: ETOBICOKE & YORK

These are fine guide books with detailed descriptions, maps and photography – and they’re all free. ‘Explore York’ details several tours on foot or on a bike you could take in this part of the inner city. Everything from public art, historic buildings, places to eat and local wildlife are contained in the slick little books. Scarborough and North York are in the series as well. For more information – http://www.toronto.ca/culturalhotspot<Reggae Lane (2015), 1529 Eglinton Avenue celebrates the musical legacy of Little Jamaica. This 1200-square-foot mural was designed by local youth, under the mentorship of artist Adrian Hales.><Squibb’s Stationers (1927), 1974 Weston Road, is TORONTO’s oldest bookstore and third oldest stationers.><Weston Public Library, 2 King Street, built in 1913, is one of 10 TORONTO libraries funded by the Carnegie Foundation, based in New York. It features ornate decoration inside and outside.><Weston Plank Road Company, 2371 Weston Road, built in 1841. Plank roads were constructed from wooden planks or split logs to make roads smoother.><The former Odd Fellows Hall, 24 Church Street, was once a Methodist Episcopal church, and the Odd Fellows turned it into a lodge. Today, the building is a private residence.>