A DOWNTOWN BREATHING SPACE – THE NEW COLLEGE PARK & BARBARA ANN SCOTT ICE TRAIL

Surrounded on all sides by high rise office buildings and condominiums, the new COLLEGE PARK provides plenty of breathing and sitting-out space for downtown office workers and the thousands who live there.The city’s Forestry and Recreation Division supervised the project which includes planning and design work from RAW Design, the MBTW Group/Watchorn Architect and Project for Public Spaces (PPS).

<PHOTO – BARBARA ANN SCOTT by Fred Chartrand/Canadian Press/2007>Canada’s 1948 Olympic gold medalist in women’s singles figure skating BARBARA ANN SCOTT (1928-2012) would be pleased to know that TORONTO and developers Canderel Stoneridge have agreed to rebuild both the skating rink and ice trail.You’ll find COLLEGE PARK at 420 Yonge Street in a district that’s undergoing some big changes.  There’s no better place to sit and contemplate.

 

Advertisements

ANOTHER AFRICAN PENGUIN, ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST ENDANGERED, HAS ARRIVED AT TORONTO ZOO

According to a press release, the African Penguin is one of the most endangered penguin species in the world, The population in the wild has dropped by more than 97% over the past century.

The birds are threatened by food shortages due to climate change and over-fishing, disease, predators, and oil spills, Recent estimates suggest there could be as few as 25,000 breeding pairs left in the wild, the zoo said.

TORONTO ZOO PLANS A $5-MILLION LATE-NIGHT LIGHT SHOW, AND A BABY ZEBRA GETS A NAME

The City has approved a $5-million loan, making way for “Lumina Experience”, an after hours light show. The “immersive illuminations and interactive displays” will be accessible on walking tours that last about an hour.The show will be produced by the MOMENT FACTORY, a multimedia company based in MONTREAL, which has created similar projects in Canada and around the world –  Old Fort Henry in Kingston, Ontario; Singapore Zoo; and Whistler Resort in British Columbia to name three.  The photos below are from Moment Factory’s light exhibits that were installed in other parts of the world.  Each one is different.The TORONTO ZOO has decided on a name for its new zebra foal. Born on February 13, 2019, the little guy is now called OBI – replacing ‘Baby Stripes’. The name is in keeping with the Star Wars-inspired names of his siblings, LEIA and REY . . . 7,500 members of the public voted on a name.This is the third foal TORI, a Grevy’s Zebra, has delivered at TORONTO Zoo. Leia arrived in January 2014 and Rey in July 2016. All three were sired by Jake, an 11-year-old male. An endangered species, these animals are threatened by loss of habitat, competition for resources with domestic livestock; poaching for meat & medicinal purposes; disease and drought.

FROM THE ZOO’S PHOTO ALBUM – ANIMALS & BIRDS THAT CALL ONTARIO & GTR. TORONTO HOME

TORONTO is home to thousands of black & gray SQUIRRELS.  By burying seeds and nuts, they’e an important part of the city’s ecosystem.  Their hard work promotes germination and forest renewal.

The MASSASSAUGA RATTLESNAKE is an endangered species.  Over a dozen have been born at the Zoo.  They’re shy reptiles, and it’s illegal to harass, harm or kill one.

Owls in the Greater TORONTO Area – Great Horned, Eastern Screech, Barred, Northern Saw Whet, Great Grey & occasional/seasonal, the Snowy Owl.Elsa, the ARCTIC FOX, 1.5-years-old, came to TORONTO from Parc Safari.  She’s joined others in the Tundra Trek.

Breathing in the Northland, a member of the Zoo’s POLAR BEAR family.

And one new-resident of Ontario, an AFRICAN PENGUIN, a participant in the Zoo’s Species Survival Plan.  Seventeen new chicks were born here, since the species arrived in 2011.

It’s easy to get to TORONTO ZOO – by car, from downtown, take the 401 Eastbound to Exit 389, Meadowvale Road.  Follow the Zoo signs to 361A Old Finch Avenue.  Large parking lot.  By TTC bus, take the subway (Sheppard Line) to DON MILLS STATION.  Bus #85 leaves from there, and will drop you in front of the Zoo entrance about 45 minutes later.  Along the way, you’ll pass through suburban Don Mills and Scarborough.

‘THE LESLIE ST. SPIT’ ALLOWS TORONTONIANS TO EMBRACE NATURE, ESPECIALLY ON WEEKENDS

The Leslie Street Spit, TORONTO’s ‘artificial-natural’ habitat, extends 5 kilometres into Lake Ontario at the foot of Leslie Street.

The Spit was created largely from construction excavations, and is now home to numerous wild animals, birds and butterflies, as well as weekend joggers, cyclists and hikers.

<PHOTO ABOVE – constructing the Spit, 1990 to 1994, City of Toronto Archives>TOMMY THOMPSON PARK is on the man-made peninsula, and contains some of the largest existing natural habitat on the TORONTO waterfront. Wildlife, especially birds, flourish in the park, making it one of the best nature-watching areas in the GTA.<PHOTO – view of the city from the park, January 16/2019>  The Park contains 10 kilometres of accessible paved trail.<PHOTO – Toronto at night from Tommy Thompson Park>

<PHOTO by Frank Lennon/Toronto Star via Getty Images>  Who was TOMMY THOMPSON (1913-1985)? The Park’s namesake was a TORONTO Parks Commissioner who really loved his job. Among many of his achievements was the conversion of Toronto Island into one enormous park. He’s best known for a sign in the city’s spotless network of parks – “Please Walk On The Grass”.For detailed information on The Spit, Tommy Thompson Park & other parks in the region (including opening times and photographs) go to – https://trca.ca/parks/tommy-thompson-park/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI3oOh852J4AIVR57ACh1vowCuEAAYASAAEgL_yvD_BwE

ALLAN GARDENS WELCOMES YOU INTO IT’S ANNUAL OUT-OF-THE-COLD CHRISTMAS FLOWER SHOW

What better way to pass some time and warmup than by visiting the Allan Gardens Conservatory, south of Carlton, east of Jarvis. This year over 40 varieties of poinsettias are on display, along with thousands of flowering plants from around the world.

The flowers are grown in the City of TORONTO High Park greenhouse. Admission is free.

ONE OF TORONTO’S HISTORIC MUSEUMS – COLBORNE LODGE IN HIGH PARK, BUILT IN 1837

This rare Regency picturesque cottage memorializes JOHN and JEMIMA HOWARD who founded High Park. John Howard was one of the city’s first architects, a city engineer and surveyor. The rooms contain the original furnishings, artifacts, and some of Howard’s watercolors of early TORONTO. Southend of High Park on Colborne Lodge Drive, 416-392-6916 – http://www.toronto.ca/culture/colborne.htm