FIRST OF ITS KIND IN CANADA – TORONTO ZOO OPENS A STATE-OF-THE-ART WILDLIFE HEALTH CENTRE

The TORONTO Zoo takes pride in being a centre of excellence when it comes to animal care, reproductive sciences, nutritional physiology, conservation and wildlife research.Now the Zoo has a modern facility and a team devoted to wildlife health care.
<Dr. PAULINE DELNATTE working on a “client”.>TORONTO Zoo invites you to see behind-the-scenes in several of the rooms – Diagnostic Imaging, Treatment, Surgery, Clinical Lab and Endocrinology Lab.The Wildlife Health Centre is open to the public daily from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. From the Tundra Zoomobile Station, follow the path adjacent to the Greenhouse.

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NOT SO LONG AGO, THE TWO GATEWAYS TO EXHIBITION PLACE WERE ARCHITECTURAL CHALLENGES

The first DUFFERIN GATE was built in 1895 <that’s it in the middle>. It became a meeting place for people preparing to enter the Canadian National Exhibition. But as the Fair was modernizing, the first low-rise gate was torn down in 1910 and replaced by architect G.W. GOUINLOCK’s grand structure, with single storied wings on either side of the entrance.Then in 1959 a new modern gateway took shape, with nearby railway, streetcar and bus stops.The new Gate was decorated with flags, lightbulbs and garlands, giving it “a theatrical look”, according to William Dendy in his book ‘Lost Toronto’. It was designed by ARTHUR KEITH, who’d been chief architect on Toronto Transit’s Yonge subway project.  It reminds me of a smaller version of the St. Louis Arch. <b/w photos by City of TORONTO Archives & Sidewalk Labs>Meanwhile, on the east side of the grounds, a spectacular new Princes’ Gate, dedicated to the Prince of Wales, took the place of honour as the main entrance to Exhibition Place and the C.N.E. <PHOTO BELOW by JACK LANDAU, UrbanToronto.ca >

REACHING TORONTO HIKING & BIKE TRAILS, BEACHES, THE ZOO, GARDENS, BLUFFS, ETC. BY PUBLIC TRANSIT

MARTIN GOODMAN WATERFRONT TRAIL – a 78-kilometre multi-use path for biking, running and walking along TORONTO’s waterfront. The Trail traverses the lake shore from Humber Bay in the west to the Rouge River in the east. Take the subway to Union Station, then the streetcar to Queen’s Quay, and you’re there.TORONTO ISLANDS’ FERRY DOCKS – foot of Bay Street at Queen’s Quay, west of the Westin Harbour Castle Hotel. From Union Station walk south on Bay Street. Ward’s Island boasts a small village and the island’s only patio restaurant. Kids love Centre Island.EAST END BEACHES – Line #2 subway to Woodbine station; transfer to Woodbine bus #92 . . . . . . .  OR from Queen Street downtown take the Queen streetcar #501 eastbound to Neville Park. Get off at Woodbine and Queen and then walk south. Woodbine is the largest beach in the area.TORONTO BOTANICAL GARDENS, 777 Lawrence Avenue East at Leslie Street.  Line #1 subway to EGLINTON station.  Then take the 51, 54 or 162 bus to LAWRENCE Avenue. The Gardens are on the southwest corner. From the south end of the Gardens there’s access to the Don River Ravine.TORONTO ZOO – subway Line #1, transfer to Sheppard Line at Sheppard Station, to DON MILLS STATION.  Bus #85 leaves from here, and will drop you in front of the Zoo entrance about 45 minutes later.SCARBOROUGH BLUFFS – Line #2 east to Victoria Park station. Then a 12 or 12-B Kingston Rd bus east to the Brimley Rd/Kingston Rd intersection. From there the Scarborough Bluffs are about a 10 minute walk south on Brimley Rd. Running 15 kilometres (9.3 miles) along the coastline of Lake Ontario, the Bluffs are home to beaches, walking trails, wild flora and fauna, a marina and some of the finest homes in the city.EVERGREEN BRICKWORKS – in the Don Valley, where the bricks were made that built TORONTO. A city bus is operated by the TTC (Toronto Transit Commission).  Take the #28 from DAVISVILLE subway station on Line #1. The bus runs from 6 am to 1:00 am from Monday to Saturday and 8am–6pm on Sundays . . . . . . There’s also the Evergreen shuttle bus, Monday to Friday, every 30–45 minutes from the parkette on Erindale Ave, east of Broadview Ave., north of Line #2’s Broadview subway station. Capacity of the bus – 20 seated; 6 standing.And of course there’s so much more including city-run golf courses, the vast ravine network, West TORONTO beaches, public swimming pools and aqua centres, and the Bike Share program, sponsored by the Toronto-Dominion Bank.

THERE’S A PEACEFUL REFUGE FOR RETIRED DONKEYS AND IT’S NOT VERY FAR FROM TORONTO

The hard workers of the equine world are too often taken for granted, treated inhumanely, and considered disposable as they age. Since 1992, the Donkey Sanctuary of Canada, a short drive west of TORONTO, has been a refuge for donkeys, mules and hinnies (offspring of a horse stallion and a jenny donkey) who’ve been abandoned, abused or put up for adoption. Sixty-one of them live in peace at the Sanctuary, and another 40 are in care at foster farms.<PHOTO ABOVE – Daily Hive>The Sanctuary’s charter grants all of the animals – the right of life regardless of age or condition; a dignified and peaceful death; freedom from hunger and thirst; freedom from discomfort and pain, fear and distress.To learn more about the Donkey Sanctuary of Canada, hours of operation, education, programs and tours, check their website – http://www.thedonkeysanctuary.caHOW TO GET THERE – From TORONTO take Highway 401 westbound, exit #295, Highway 6 North. Go to the second road, Puslinch Concession 4, turn left and proceed to #6981.

HIGH WINDS & WAVES ARE SUBMERGING PARTS OF THE TORONTO ISLANDS INTO LAKE ONTARIO

Since 2017, flooding of TORONTO’s archipelago of 15 islands has been of great concern to the Toronto Region Conservation Authority (TRCA). In the future, there could be new beaches and bridges, with raised barriers (or berms), elevation of low-lying roads, increased shore protection structures, and re-routed surface drainage to already installed sump pumps.PHOTOS taken by BRYAN BLENKIN on July 25/2019.

THE DOCTORS’ PARKETTE @ BRUNSWICK & COLLEGE STREETS, HONOURS MEDICAL HISTORY

RICHARD LONGLEY in NOW Magazine – “The job is done. The Doctor’s Parkette, dedicated to honour the medical history of HARBORD VILLAGE, whose stars included Dr. Norman Bethune & Dr. Henry Morgentaler (and other prominent doctors who lived in the area, along with its hospitals) transformed this once-squalid corner.”A design competition announced by the Harbord Village Residents’ Association in 2011 to revitalize the site produced 27 entries from eight countries. A panel of professionals judged them and residents voted for their favourites. (In 2018 – 7 years later – the Doctors’ Parkette became reality). <PHOTOS – PMA Lanscape Architects Limited>