UNDERWAY – CONSTRUCTION OF BARBARA ANN SCOTT PARK, BETWEEN YONGE & BAY STREETS

<PHOTO – BARBARA ANN SCOTT by Fred Chartrand/Canadian Press/2007>

Canada’s 1948 Olympic gold medalist in women’s singles figure skating BARBARA ANN SCOTT (1928-2012) would be pleased to know that TORONTO and developers Canderel Stoneridge have agreed to rebuild both the skating rink and the park itself.

This park is surrounded on all sides by skyscrapers, town houses and condo apartments in a densely populated downtown neighbourhood. The project should be completed in the very near future.

TORONTO’s Forestry and Recreation Division is supervising the revitalization which includes planning and design work from RAW Design, the MBTW Group/Watchorn Architect and Project for Public Spaces (PPS).

Advertisements

TORONTO’S LARGEST FISHING HOLE IS GRENADIER POND IN THE WEST END’S HIGH PARK

The old Town of York Garrison once dropped their lines into Grenadier Pond back in the early 1800’s. The tradition continues to this day as Torontonians land largemouth bass, black crappie, yellow perch, pumpkinseed, bluegill, brown bullhead and carp. The large body of water is deep, and the fish are safe to eat.The Pond receives water from Wendigo Creek (a small creek that begins near Dundas Street West and Law Street and runs down to Lake Ontario, along with other underground streams from the north. The northern, southern and south-western shores are naturalized, improving the Pond’s health.  Grenadier Pond exits into Lake Ontario via pipes near Sir Casimir Gzowski Park.

<PAINTING ABOVE – Grenadier Pond in 1800, by John George Howard, 1803-1890>

<20,000 PEOPLE on the ice watching a dog sled race, 1914><SKATE SAILING on Grenadier Pond, 1933>

<ALONG THE SHORE of The Pond, June 22, 1958>

<LONE SKATER, 2008-13>

<WALKING ON THE ICE, 2008-13>

<FLOWER GARDEN, 1972, on the shoreline><FLOWER GARDEN AERIAL, 2018, photo – @shanii1>

<ALL PHOTOS – except the last one are from the City of Toronto Archives/Sidewalk Labs>

FEAR OF CENTIPEDES? THE TORONTO ZOO SAYS THE WORD FOR THAT IS CHILOPODOPHOBIA’

Despite their name, centipedes don’t actually have one hundred legs – some have fewer, though others may have many more. Regardless, the majority of these “creepy crawlies” are very small and completely harmless to humans. They spend their lives under rocks and logs and other moist environments.

House centipedes in particular, which many Torontonians might encounter in their basements, cause a lot of fear due to their fast running speed and numerous long legs; however, they may actually be beneficial because they eat smaller invertebrate pests (e.g. silverfish, cockroaches, etc.).

IT’S EASY TO REACH TORONTO ZOO, CANADA’S LARGEST – BY CAR OR ON PUBLIC TRANSPORT

<“Come on out and see us some time – we’d love to see YOU.”>

<SAMSON, the Grizzly Bear, lives up to his name.>

It’s easy to get to TORONTO ZOO – by car, from downtown, take the 401 Eastbound to Exit 389, Meadowvale Road.  Follow the Zoo signs to 361A Old Finch Avenue.  Large parking lot.

By TTC bus, take the subway (Sheppard Line) to DON MILLS STATION.  Bus #85 leaves from there, and will drop you in front of the Zoo entrance about 45 minutes later.  Along the way, you’ll pass through suburban Don Mills and Scarborough.

SCARBOROUGH’S GUILD PARK & GARDENS DISPLAY ARCHITECTURAL RELICS FROM TORONTO’S PAST

<PHOTO – Ross Winter>

Never having been there before. I was totally surprised by the beauty of this Scarborough park, property of the TORONTO and Region Conservation Authority.

<The Greek Theatre was built from the remnants of a Bank of TORONTO; photo – SimonP.>

Located on the Scarborough Bluffs, this huge spread of grassy meadow is punctuated by large-scale relics from TORONTO’s past – mostly from the downtown Financial District. They were saved, beginning in the late 1950’s as the buildings themselves were being demolished.

<TORONTO Star Building, 80 King Street West, Chapman & Oxley Architects>

<The Osterhout Log Cabin, oldest building in Scarborough, commissioned in 1795 by John Graves Simcoe, First Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada>

<Carvings from the Bank of Nova Scotia, 39 King Street West, 1903-69>

The park is off Guildwood Parkway, east of Eglinton Avenue East and Kingston Road. Most of the area is forested and eventually leads to a ravine and Lake Ontario.

<ABOVE – the belfry of Victoria Park School>

THE DON VALLEY’S RICH CLAY PRODUCED TORONTO’S BUILDING BLOCKS; NOW IT’S A NATURAL REFUGE

A national charity, the Evergreen Brick Works, 550 Bayview Avenue, are constantly changing.  Bike clinics, murals and art galleries, movies, hiking trails, a quarry garden, wildlife, a farmer’s market, industrial architecture, music, programming for children – and the original kilns and brick-making apparati.  Website – http://www.evergreen.ca

<PHOTO – the Don Valley Brick Works in 1891; City of Toronto Archives>

Recorded as both Nechenquakekonk and Wonscotonach in Algonquin language, the DON was part of an ancient Indigenous trail network connecting Lake Ontario to the upper great lakes, It was prized by the Wendat, Haudenosaunee and Anishnaabek Confederacies as a seasonal, resource-rich terrain.

The Valley became a major industrial site, producing the bricks needed for a rapidly growing TORONTO.

GETTING THERE:  shuttle bus, 7 days a week, every half hour, from BROADVIEW subway station;  TTC’s 28A Davisville bus offers half-hourly service on Saturdays from 7:30am–6pm and Sundays from 8am–6pm.  http://ebw.evergreen.ca/visit/getting-here

SOME RESIDENTS OF TORONTO ZOO, CANADA’S LARGEST – THEY’RE PHOTOGENIC NATURALS

It’s easy to get to TORONTO ZOO – by car, from downtown, take the 401 Eastbound to Exit 389, Meadowvale Road.  Follow the Zoo signs to 361A Old Finch Avenue.  Large parking lot.

By TTC bus, take the subway (Sheppard Line) to DON MILLS STATION.  Bus #85 leaves from here, and will drop you in front of the Zoo entrance about 45 minutes later.  Along the way, you’ll pass through suburban Don Mills and Scarborough.