PHILOSOPHER’S WALK TRACES THE ROUTE OF TADDLE CREEK IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

TADDLE CREEK was buried during the Industrial Age, but it left behind a scenic ravine-like footpath running from Bloor Street West to the University of TORONTO. This has been named Philosopher’s Walk.

The Creek still flows underground, but above ground the path is bounded by the Royal Ontario Museum, the Royal Conservatory of Music <PHOTO ABOVE> Koerner Concert Hall, Trinity College, the Faculty of Music at the Edward Johnson Building, and the just completed Jackman Law Building.

Faculty of Music, theatre, Edward Johnson Building

Trinity College, University of Toronto

Philosopher’s Walk Amphitheatre

Fourteen trees are planted nearby in memory of 14 women slain in Montreal on December 6, 1989. Memorial created by ‘Women Who Won’t Forget’.

Lamps at the Bloor Street entrance commemorate the 1901 visit of the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York (later crowned King George V and Queen Mary). This was a project undertaken by the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire.

ONE SUNDAY MORNING A SOUTHERN VISITOR LANDED ON LESLIE ST. SPIT – PHOTOS BY STEVEN EVANS

These folks were aligned along the edge of a wetland. Birdwatchers all, they were focused on a Tricoloured Heron, highly unusual in these parts. Its normal range is the southeastern part of the United States, and they seldom fly this far north.

<ABOVE – Tricoloured Heron, ANDY JOHNSON, ‘All About Birds’>

The LESLIE STREET SPIT is open to joggers, walkers and bikers every evening from 4:00 to 9pm, and all day on Saturdays, Sundays and Statutory Holidays. It’s closed Monday to Friday from 5:30am to 4:00pm.

The Leslie Street Spit, TORONTO’s ‘artificial-natural’ habitat, extends far out into Lake Ontario at the foot of Leslie Street.  It’s  getting bigger every day.  The Spit was created largely from construction excavations, and is now home to numerous wild animals, birds and butterflies.

AFTER A $15-MILLION REFIT, GRANGE PARK IS NOW OPEN ON DOWNTOWN’S WEST SIDE

The park belongs to the Art Gallery of Ontario. It was bequeathed by Harriet Boulton Smith to what was then called the Art Museum of Toronto. <PHOTO ABOVE – The Trolley Pole>

The City of TORONTO and private donor W. Galen Weston funded the renovation of GRANGE PARK to the tune of $10-15-million.

The playground has both typical and not-so-typical attractions.  There’s a splash pad, literary walk and an off-leash dog area.

Grange Park centrepiece – Henry Moore’s sculpture ‘Large Two Forms’
Grange Park backs onto the Art Gallery of OntarioThe Grange, one of TORONTO’s oldest houses is shown below centre.  It’s now part of the AGO.

Older trees were kept in place, while another 80 were added, including chestnut, beach and elm.

<PHOTO ABOVE – Grange Park before the rebuild began, roughly two years ago>

<Downtown skyscrapers are just a few blocks away.>

TORONTO FIGHTS THE EMERALD ASH BORER BEETLE WITH WASPS NATIVE TO CHINA

TORONTO’s ash trees, which make up 8.5% of the city’s tree canopy, are under attack from the Emerald Ash Borer beetle (EAB). Once the EAB is on an ash tree, its larvae use the tree as a feeding ground and restricts the tree’s nutrient flow, killing it within a few years.

Natural Resources Canada is breeding Tetrastichus planipennisi, a species of wasp native to China, to act as a predator of the beetle. Female wasps, once released, fly to the beetle-infested trees and lay their eggs on EAB larvae. Once they hatch, the wasp larvae will eat the EAB larvae and use their eggs as a home.

While the entire city of TORONTO is considered infested, there are still other cities like Winnipeg, Halifax, and Vancouver, that are anticipating the arrival of the EAB.

<IMAGE – Tess King/The Varsity> Read the entire article at http://thevarsity.ca/2017/04/03/torontos-forests-fight-back/

FOR 5 YEARS NOW RYERSON U. STUDENTS & STAFF HAVE BEEN FARMING UP ON A ROOFTOP

You’d never guess it was there, but four storeys above busy Church Street at Gould, the Ryerson University Urban Farm (RUF) is turning out thousands of pounds of fresh, organic and local produce.

The farm is a student-run initiative to grow fresh food atop the George Vari Engineering & Computing Centre in the middle of the concrete jungle.

RUF produces an amazing 10,000 pounds of produce annually, and distributes it among Ryerson Eats, the Gould Street Farmers’ Market and a Community Supported Agriculture Program. On the ground level the Ryerson campus also hosts a food forest, flower farm, two rain gardens (under development) and a pollinator plant garden.

All of this is within a 15-minute walk of downtown’s epicentre.

DESPITE THE STRIKE AT TORONTO ZOO, MOTHER NATURE HAS DELIVERED 10 EXOTIC CATS

  The Toronto Zoo is proud to announce the healthy births of snow leopard cubs, clouded leopard cubs and cheetah cubs.

The snow leopard cubs arrived on May 18, born to mother Ena and dad Kota. Ena came to TORONTO from Japan’s Tama Zoo.

For the first time in the Zoo’s history, two clouded leopard cubs were born on Saturday afternoon, May 13 to mom “Pavarti” and dad “Mingma.” Both parents came originally from the Nashville Zoo.

On April 30 five cheetah cubs came into the world. Laini and Patonga are the parents. The arrival of these cubs brings the number of cheetahs born at the Toronto Zoo to 53.