‘NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE’ COVER FOR SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2020 – TEXAS FOOD BANK LINEUP

<ABOVE – Long lines at food banks like this one last month, in a Texas parking lot, have become a symbol of the desperation felt by so many families in the pandemic. Today, as more than 38-million Americans have lost their jobs, the lines of hungry people keep gathering – a spiraling crisis with no end in sight. – New York Times Magazine, May 31/2020>

AS A FAN OF THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART – IT HURTS TO SEE ITS TOTAL DEMOLITION

<IMAGE – LACMA as it once was> Yes, a new project by PETER ZUMTHOR will take its place, but for me, a Canadian and regular visitor, there goes a piece of my heart. My partner and I loved spending most of a day there every time we were in Los Angeles, having lunch, doing all of the galleries, the Japanese Pavilion, and occasionally the garden and nearby TAR PITS.In April, while most workers were home under shelter-in-place orders, demolition crews were tearing down three structures created by LACMA’s modernist architect, WILLIAM PEREIRAi, that were part of the original 1965 plan. Even the museum’s Bing Theater has now been reduced to rubble.It’s all gone. Farewell to an old friend. – From an article by MIMI ZEIGER, deZeen.<LACMA as it is today by MONICA NOUWENS Photography>

WITH ALL DUE RESPECT TO ‘THE BIG APPLE’ & ITS PEOPLE – 42ND STREET AS IT ONCE WAS

You’d never recognize the place today.  New York City’s Movieland, 42nd Street, has been cleansed – Disneyfied, gentrified, purified, glamourized, call it what you will.  The seediness is all gone.Chicago artist, MITCH O’CONNELL at – http://www.mitchoconnell.blogspot.ca “Way back in the late 80s, right before 42nd Street was swept clean and purified by Disney goodness, you could still enjoy New York in all its noisy, colourful, rude and vivid glory.”“I wish I had taken 1000 more photos (and gone back at night) of the amazing buildings and people that could only be found there, but at least I got a handful of snapshots of the long gone cool decaying seediness of that bustling stretch of real estate.”

BUFFALO LOVES CANADA & VICE VERSA. IT’S A FRIENDSHIP THAT HAS STOOD THE TEST OF TIME

BUFFALO, New York State’s second largest city after NYC, has always attracted Canadians for – among other things – football, hockey, architecture, chicken wings, the Albright-Knox contemporary art museum, excellent restaurants, the airport, theatres, PBS, and friendly inhabitants. No doubt once this crisis is over we’ll be back crossing the bridges again. We’re all in this together.From our friends in BUFFALO . . . Dear Canadians – Our countries have closed our borders to non-essential travel. It’s moments like these that remind us how fortunate we are to be neighbors — a friendship that has stood the test of time and underscored our shared interests and values. We cannot wait for the day when life returns to normal, and we can welcome you back here with open arms. Take care, and be well!
Your friends in Buffalo.

MAYOR ANNE HIDALGO OF PARIS IS CONDUCTING A WAR WITH CAR & TAXI DRIVERS – AND WINNING

Ms. Hidalgo has made a lot of enemies, but a great number of Parisians support her attempt to bring nature back into the City of Light. She learned a lesson from 2019’s deadly summer heat – 42 Celsius . . . 107.6 Fahrenheit with citizens bathing in public fountains and doing their best to keep cool. <PHOTO – AccuWeather> The Spanish-born Mayor has launched 8,000 construction projects, approved by city council (including a vast network of bicycle lanes) across the city. “There’s been a very violent reaction at times,” she told Adam Nossiter of The New York Times. “Part of it has to do with being a woman. And being a woman that wants to reduce the number of cars meant that I upset lots of men. Two-thirds of public transport users are women.” <Two-way cycle track, photo – Raise The Hammer>TORONTO could learn something about dealing with climate change from PARIS. Its government is “putting nature back in the city,” says Mayor Hidalgo – “We’ve got a proactive policy, compared to other cities in the world.” Paris has risen in the list of bike-friendly cities to 8th place from 17th since 2015. ‘The War on Cars in Paris” is a good read. It’s at https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/05/world/europe/paris-anne-hildago-green-city-climate-change.html

CANADA’S OLDEST RECORD STORE IS SET TO CLOSE BY THE END OF 2019 – IT’S IN OSHAWA

When Wilson and Lee first opened for business in OSHAWA, radio was barely a thing. The most popular car in the world was Ford’s Model T. And you needed a wind-up Victrolia to play fragile 78 RPM records.  If in 1922 you wanted to buy one of those records, you could go to Wilson and Lee’s record store to find them among the musical instruments.Over the decades the firm survived depression, recessions, wars, technological changes (78s, LPs, 45s, 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs), and these days back to vinyl. It was an excellent run.After 97 years in business, Wilson and Lee is about to close.  The property at 87 Simcoe Street North has been sold to the Holiday Inn and brothers Bill (who worked at the store for 67 years) & Dave (52 years) have decided to close up shop. It’s the end of an era.<PHOTO – Bill on the left; Dave on the right – by Durham Region News>