RIVER STREET, PARALLELING THE DON RIVER, IS EVOLVING FROM LOW-RISE TO WAY UP-RISE

   Bordering on Regent Park and close to Downtown and Cabbagetown, River Street offers both condominum apartments and reasonably priced rentals. Parts of Old Toronto linger as well., and well-used bike paths (especially on weekends) follow the sidewalks.  It may not be fancy, but it’s coming along as a new East Side TORONTO neighbourhood.Public transit and major cross-town streets add some pizazz to what once was a hangout for ladies-of-the-evening.There’s been quite a change in River Street over the last few years, and it’s not nearly finished yet.  There’s construction all around, especially in neighbouring Regent Park.

ON A SUNNY HOLIDAY WEEKEND PHOTOGRAPHER ROSS WINTER CHECKED OUT CABBAGETOWN

<Metcalfe Street is alive with a multitude of trees – and black squirrels><F’Amelia, a very popular dining spot at #12 Amelia Street,><Some gingerbread on Sumach Street – one of the neighbourhood’s most photographed houses.><Hard to believe, but this was once a convenience store. Notice the traffic calming signs. They’re everywhere.><The corner ice-cream and coffee shop & gathering place – Sumach Street, opposite Riverdale Park.><A typical Cabbagetown laneway – there are many of them. Coming soon – more laneway houses if City Hall permits.>

CARVED FROM BACKYARDS OF NEIGHBOURING HOMES, CRAVEN ROAD’S ‘TINY TOWN’ HOUSES ARE UNIQUE

“As TORONTO continues to be surrounded by more and more condo buildings, it is fun being reminded that somewhere near these gigantic high-rise buildings lives a world of little spaces. Craven Road and the Tiny House Society have managed to prove that a few hundred square feet is more than enough space to live comfortably — even among rooms full of history.” – Spacing Magazine.CRAVEN ROAD is reachable by the Queen Street East and Dundas East streetcar lines. The subway stop is COXWELL.

ROSEDALE, SETTLED IN 1820, IS TORONTO’S VERSION OF LONDON’S HAMPSTEAD – BUT WITH RAVINES

‘R’ is for Rosedale, proclaims a condo billboard along the frontier of one of TORONTO’s oldest inner suburbs and one of its wealthiest.The subway and two bus lines run through the neighbourhood.  8,000 live within its precinct, and there’s plenty of ‘Old Money’ around.Rosedale is crisscrossed by three ravines, and its streets go uphill and downdale.  It’s a wonderful place to walk, run and bicycle; the gardens and trees are gorgeous, and there are few fences or barricades.You can get lost in here, but the locals are quite friendly and helpful.Within the neighbourhood it’s all houses, parks, gardens, bridges, ravines – and one small row of shops where refreshments are available.Rosedale’s main street is Yonge Street.
  Subway stop – ROSEDALE, and then walk or take Bus #82; or Subway stop – SHERBOURNE, and then Bus #75

A FRIEND DIDN’T KNOW THAT SOME BIRDS RISE AT 3:00 AM & START SINGING – HE KNOWS NOW.

Before TORONTO traffic and construction starts in the morning, some birds are up well before the sun. Not only do they sing in the morning, but they sing loud. Robins, for instance, are so sensitive to light and they’re such early risers that even a tiny bit of light is enough to wake them up and start them chirping.DAVID SIBLEY, a birder, artist, and author of ‘What It’s Like To Be A Bird’ says if you’re bored, try watching birds. “Birds make a lot of noise and their songs and calls all mean something. It takes some practice to hear them, but once you start noticing these sounds you will hear them everywhere.”“In these days when travel is restricted, when a lot of experiences are impossible, birds bring the experience to you.” – DAVID SIBLEY Yesterday two cardinals visited. They seem to come only once every year. This year they were early, spent a few minutes looking around, and then took off – never to be seen again until 2021. I live close to the Don Valley, and probably their permanent residence is somewhere down there.  There are plenty of birds and a wildlife sanctuary in the Don Ravine.

TORONTO PHOTOGRAPHER ELIOT WRIGHT INVESTIGATES THE CITY’S TRANSITIONING DUPONT STREET

A seemingly unremarkable thoroughfare, DUPONT STREET is located alongside the Canadian Pacific Railway line that long ago marked TORONTO’s city limits.Leaving behind its industrial past in the face of rapid redevelopment, the old street epitomizes the fact that modern, urban landscapes are always in flux.