KENSINGTON MRKT. IS AN EAST VILLAGE, VENICE BOARDWALK AND WOODSTOCK ROLLED INTO ONE

Kensington Market is a National Historic Site and the locals fight hard to keep it that way. There are no big box stores. The multicultural neighbourhood occupies a large tract of land from College Street to the north, Spadina on the east, Dundas on the south and Bathurst Street to the west. The area is filled with food stores of every kind, a variety of upscale & downscale restaurants, nightclubs, coffee bars, vintage clothing shops, synagogues, and re-jigged architecture of every description.

TORONTO NEVER STOPS BUILDING – THESE PROJECTS BORDER DOWNTOWN’S RAILWAY LINES

The Railway Lands are a great neighbourhood to wander around in. Other than high rises, you can watch the trains coming and going from Union Station.  <The GO Trains below are parked.> There’s parkland, restaurants, public art – and Spadina Avenue and Bathurst Street aren’t far away.This bridge across the railway lines connects the south side with the north, and from there Draper Street, a Heritage Conservation District.This little brick street has survived overall industrialization of the King-Spadina neighbourhood.The street is named after William Henry Draper (1801-77).  He was a lawyer and a politician, and later was appointed Chief Justice of Post-Confederation Ontario in 1869.

RIVER STREET, PARALLELING THE DON RIVER, IS EVOLVING FROM LOW-RISE TO WAY UP-RISE

   Bordering on Regent Park and close to Downtown and Cabbagetown, River Street offers both condominum apartments and reasonably priced rentals. Parts of Old Toronto linger as well., and well-used bike paths (especially on weekends) follow the sidewalks.  It may not be fancy, but it’s coming along as a new East Side TORONTO neighbourhood.Public transit and major cross-town streets add some pizazz to what once was a hangout for ladies-of-the-evening.There’s been quite a change in River Street over the last few years, and it’s not nearly finished yet.  There’s construction all around, especially in neighbouring Regent Park.

ON A SUNNY HOLIDAY WEEKEND PHOTOGRAPHER ROSS WINTER CHECKED OUT CABBAGETOWN

<Metcalfe Street is alive with a multitude of trees – and black squirrels><F’Amelia, a very popular dining spot at #12 Amelia Street,><Some gingerbread on Sumach Street – one of the neighbourhood’s most photographed houses.><Hard to believe, but this was once a convenience store. Notice the traffic calming signs. They’re everywhere.><The corner ice-cream and coffee shop & gathering place – Sumach Street, opposite Riverdale Park.><A typical Cabbagetown laneway – there are many of them. Coming soon – more laneway houses if City Hall permits.>

CARVED FROM BACKYARDS OF NEIGHBOURING HOMES, CRAVEN ROAD’S ‘TINY TOWN’ HOUSES ARE UNIQUE

“As TORONTO continues to be surrounded by more and more condo buildings, it is fun being reminded that somewhere near these gigantic high-rise buildings lives a world of little spaces. Craven Road and the Tiny House Society have managed to prove that a few hundred square feet is more than enough space to live comfortably — even among rooms full of history.” – Spacing Magazine.CRAVEN ROAD is reachable by the Queen Street East and Dundas East streetcar lines. The subway stop is COXWELL.