THE TORONTO POLICE PIPE BAND, FOUNDED IN 1912, IS AMONG THE BEST IN THE WORLD

There are over 10,000 pipe bands in the world, and TORONTO has one of the finest.  The Toronto Police Pipe Band, founded in 1912, is reputedly up in the Top 30.  Its members are primarily from the Greater Toronto Area, but some live as far away as Montreal, Ottawa, New England and Michigan.  <PHOTO ABOVE – the Band marching in the Santa Claus Parade>

<PHOTO ABOVE – The original Toronto Police Pipe Band, 1912>

A premier grade, or “grade one” band, a less-experienced “grade three” band and an overall “public service” band all come together to form the Toronto Police Pipe Band.

<PHOTO – Recording a CD at TORONTO’s El Mocambo nightclub>

<PHOTO – Fergus Highland Games, 2001>

<PHOTO – The Band in front of city hall, Nathan Philips Square>

Advertisements

ONCE THEY CALLED TORONTO “MUDDY YORK” – I WONDER WHY – ARCHIVAL PHOTOS, 1907

<Where King & Queen Streets meet, Parkdale, 1907, City of Toronto Archives>

<King & Queen Streets intersect near the bridge across the Don River, 1907, City of Toronto Archives>

A TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSION RAIL GRINDING CAR, QUEEN STREET EAST, CA1950-65

The task of this early version of a rail grinder car was to make sure the streetcar tracks were smooth. This, and several later models were retired because they were not able to get up to speed in heavy traffic, and lighter machinery became available to do the job.

In September, 2002, the TTC removed grinders from their property, donating them to the Halton County Railway Museum. <PHOTO – City of Toronto Archives/Sidewalk Labs>

 

SUBURBAN STYLE, 1961-70’S – WHEN SUBURBS WERE MARKETED AS COUNTRY TOWNS & VILLAGES

Names taken from TORONTO newspapers in the 1970’s for suburban developments – Camelot Village, Cobble Hill Estates, Tall Trees, Forest Hills, Woodstream Meadows, Country Club Estates, Cedar Mills, Willows of Victoria, Rosemary Gardens, Meadows of Manvers, Glades of Fleet, and Parkwood Gardens.

Missing in action – rabbits, foxes, beavers, rivers, ravines and hills.  <PHOTO – City of Toronto Archives>

HIDDEN TORONTO #5 – A CITY THAT’S CONSTANTLY REINVENTING ITSELF AS IT KEEPS ON GROWING

In a city like TORONTO special places are often hiding in plain sight.  A few more of my favourites below . . .

The surviving Roman Catholic Chapel and Central Prison surrounded by condos and townhouses in the Liberty Village neighborhood.

The Bovine Sex Club, known locally as “the real imitation”, 542 Queen Street West, has been “in” since its opening.

Pacific Mall, the largest Hong Kong-style shopping centre in North America, 4300 Steeles Avenue East, established in 1997, https://www.pacificmalltoronto.ca/

Remains of the French Fort Rouillé, 1750, Exhibition Place, west of the Rose Garden

bpNichol Lane, named for poet & small press editor bpNichol (1944-88), one of his poems is drilled into the concrete

Le Paradis, 166 Bedford Road, an authentic French bistro, since 1986, 416-921-0995 <PHOTO – Tatiana>

Interior Old City Hall & Courthouse, 1892, $1.5-million final cost – $1-million over budget

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, books, documents, Galileo to Anne Murray to Leonard Cohen, researchers welcome, 120 St. George St., http://www.library.utoronto.ca/fisher

 Toronto Arts and Letters Club, 14 Elm Street, formed in 1908, bar, library, photos, art, illustrious past members, critics, painters, musicians, beautiful auditorium, etc. – https://www.artsandlettersclub.ca/