SUBURBAN STYLE, 1961-70’S – WHEN SUBURBS WERE MARKETED AS COUNTRY TOWNS & VILLAGES

Names taken from TORONTO newspapers in the 1970’s for suburban developments – Camelot Village, Cobble Hill Estates, Tall Trees, Forest Hills, Woodstream Meadows, Country Club Estates, Cedar Mills, Willows of Victoria, Rosemary Gardens, Meadows of Manvers, Glades of Fleet, and Parkwood Gardens.

Missing in action – rabbits, foxes, beavers, rivers, ravines and hills.  <PHOTO – City of Toronto Archives>

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HIDDEN TORONTO #5 – A CITY THAT’S CONSTANTLY REINVENTING ITSELF AS IT KEEPS ON GROWING

In a city like TORONTO special places are often hiding in plain sight.  A few more of my favourites below . . .

The surviving Roman Catholic Chapel and Central Prison surrounded by condos and townhouses in the Liberty Village neighborhood.

The Bovine Sex Club, known locally as “the real imitation”, 542 Queen Street West, has been “in” since its opening.

Pacific Mall, the largest Hong Kong-style shopping centre in North America, 4300 Steeles Avenue East, established in 1997, https://www.pacificmalltoronto.ca/

Remains of the French Fort Rouillé, 1750, Exhibition Place, west of the Rose Garden

bpNichol Lane, named for poet & small press editor bpNichol (1944-88), one of his poems is drilled into the concrete

Le Paradis, 166 Bedford Road, an authentic French bistro, since 1986, 416-921-0995 <PHOTO – Tatiana>

Interior Old City Hall & Courthouse, 1892, $1.5-million final cost – $1-million over budget

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, books, documents, Galileo to Anne Murray to Leonard Cohen, researchers welcome, 120 St. George St., http://www.library.utoronto.ca/fisher

 Toronto Arts and Letters Club, 14 Elm Street, formed in 1908, bar, library, photos, art, illustrious past members, critics, painters, musicians, beautiful auditorium, etc. – https://www.artsandlettersclub.ca/

HIDDEN TORONTO #4 – MORE SCATTERED TREASURES WITHIN OUR CITY’S 630.6 km² (243 SQUARE MILES)

Every big city has hidden secrets that only the locals know.  Here are more of TORONTO’s.

<Baps Shri Swaminarayan Mendir, 61 Clairville Drive, Etobicoke>

<Ryerson University’s secret garden, Gould Street, just off downtown Yonge Street>

<An apiary on the Fairmont Royal York Hotel’s rooftop, for downtown honeybees.>

<The infinity swimming pool on top of the Thompson Hotel, 55 Wellington Street West>

<Pottery Road Bike and Pedestrian Crossing>

<The Terra Cotta House, 20 Jerome Street>

<John Scadding cabin, one of TORONTO’s original residences, Exhibition Place>

<Famed pianist Glenn Gould’s final resting place beside his parents, Mount Pleasant Cemetery>

<The tiny houses of Craven Road>

<TORONTO’s official flag>

CANADIANS TELL AMERICANS HOW TO HAVE SEX IN A CANOE – NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE

“All the news that’s fit to print” covers a lot of territory in the New York Times. This week some tips on making love in a canoe made it into their Magazine on July 29th.

JAMES RAFFIN, former executive director of the Canadian Canoe Museumhttp://www.canoemuseum.ca – came up with directions in point form . . .
– to avoid capsizing, bodies should stay low in the hull
– centre of gravity is most important
– stow your paddles, handle ends down, behind the stern seat
– take out the removable centre thwart, if there is one, in the event of a flip
– let your hips roll with the canoe
– keep some body parts visible above the gunwale
– a canoe with nobody in it raises alarm
– only remove your life jacket if you’re a capable swimmer
– black flies and mosquitos are most active around twilight

The Museum was The Peterborough Examiner’s newsmaker of the year for 2017 after successfully convincing the federal, provincial and city governments to donate millions to help erect a new $65-million building.  The new museum is expected to open in 2021.

GORDON LIGHTFOOT, a Canadian “icon”, donated a few canoes – including the yellow one that inspired his song ‘Canary Yellow Canoe’.

There are 600 canoes in the collection – 100 on display at a time.

Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau (Justin’s father) loved canoeing – especially in the Far North.

THE DETAILS – Article by MALIA WOLLAN, New York Times Magazine; photos by CLIFFORD SKARSTED, Peterborough Examiner; The Canadian Canoe Museum, 910 Monaghan Road, PETERBOROUGH, 85 miles (135 kilometers) from TORONTO. 

HOW WE’VE CHANGED – BERCZY PARK AND THE FLAT IRON BUILDING – AUGUST 14/1975 & 2018

Looking east across a parking lot to the Flat Iron Building; Canadian Stage theatres on the right, 1975.

<BERCY PARK, 2018>

<FLAT IRON mural as it is in 2018>

<More parking, Wellington Street, the King Edward Hotel and St. James’ Cathedral, 1975>

<BERCZY PARK fountain and Wellington Street high-rises, 2018; archival photos City of Toronto Archives/Sidewalk Labs>

PAINTINGS, ADVERTISING & SKETCHES OF EARLY TORONTO ARE PROTECTED IN THE CITY’S ARCHIVE

<ABOVE – St. Lawrence Market South, 1895>  These images are part of a vast collection of visuals stored in the City of TORONTO Archives. Accessible, thanks to the Archives themselves and Sidewalk Labs, they date back to the mid and late 1800’s, when the city was just beginning to find its way.

<GUINANE’S MONSTER SHOE STORE, 214 Yonge Street, ca1880, advertising card>

<WILLIAM LYON MACKENZIE HOUSE, York Street, north of Richmond West, ca1888; artist Frederic Victor Poole; painted in 1912>

William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861) was a journalist, Mayor of TORONTO, and leader of the 1837 Upper Canada Rebellion. After escaping to the United States for a while, he returned to Canada from exile and became an elected member of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada from 1851-58. His town house on Bond Street is now a museum.

<CRISPIN’S TAVERN, Richmond at York Street, attributed to Owen Staples (1866-1949)>

<SHERBOURNE STREET BREWERY, artist Owen Staples, painted in ca1900>

<GEORGE TATTLE HOUSE, St. Clair Avenue between Avenue Road & Poplar Plains Road, by Joseph Thomas Ralph (1831-1916)>

<NORTHERN RAILROAD STATION, Front Street, west of Spadina Avenue, date unknown>

<DEMOLISHING A WATER TOWER, St. George’s Reservoir, Dundas Street West near Huron St., 1882>

<HEINZMAN & COMPANY PIANOS, 117 King Street West, advertising card, ca1880>

30,000+ historic photos are now on-line thanks to Sidewalk Labs & the City of TORONTO Archives. An invaluable research facility, the OLD TORONTO website is very easy to use. You’ll find it at https://oldtoronto.sidewalklabs.com/