EARLIEST KNOWN PHOTOS OF TORONTO TAKEN FROM THE ROSSIN HOUSE HOTEL IN 1856 OR 1857

<Osgoode Hall is in the upper left corner>. This five-part panorama is from the City of Toronto Archives.> <Photogaphers – Armstrong, Beere and Hime. It’s possible that these pictures were intended to accompany TORONTO’s submission to the Colonial Office to promote its selection as capital of the Province of Canada.>In the end, Queen Victoria chose OTTAWA to be Canada’s capital.<The developing city from York Street to Bay Street along King Street West.>

THE ELGIN & WINTER GARDEN THEATRES ARE OVER 100 YEARS OLD & YOU CAN VISIT

One sits on top of the other.  On the bottom – the resplendent ELGIN, and on top – the WINTER GARDEN, with its pastel lamps and leafy bowers.These are the last remaining double-decker Edwardian-era theatres in the world. 189 Yonge Street, above Queen.<PHOTO ABOVE – The Elgin><PHOTO ABOVE – The Winter Garden>This National Historic Site offers year-round tours – Thursdays at 5pm & Saturdays at 11am.  Adults $12; students and seniors $10. Cash only. No reservations required.Tours include samples from the vaudeville scenery collection, the Winter Garden’s original Simplex Silent Film Projector and a vaudeville-era dressing room.  Ontario Heritage Trust website – http://www.heritagetrust.on.ca

A BRITISH LIBRARIAN PLANTED THE SEEDS FOR TORONTO’S PRE-1910 CHILDREN’S BOOK COLLECTIONS

The OSBORNE COLLECTION OF CHILDREN’S BOOKS (BEFORE 1910) began with a visit from British librarian EDGAR OSBORNE.He was greatly impressed by the range and quality of children’s services within the TPL (Toronto Public Library) system.OSBORNE donated his personal collection of some 2,000 rare books in 1949. The numbers have grown to over 80,000 rare and notable modern children’s books. Now there are several collections within the collection.The oldest artefacts include a 14th century manuscript of Aesop’s fables, 16th century school books; Florence Nighingale’s childhood library; Queen Mary’s children’s books; penny dreadfuls, chapbooks, Puritan works, and fifteen-century traditional talesLillian H. Smith library is located at 239 College Street, not far from the University of TORONTO.

CJRT CELEBRATES ITS 70TH YEAR – FIRST AS AN EDUCATIONAL STN. NOW TORONTO’S JAZZ FM

CJRT-FM has been on the air since November 1, 1949 as Canada’s first educational radio station on the FM band. The commercial-free station was part of Ryerson’s School of Broadcasting and Electronics, with input from the University of TORONTO, the Ontario Department of Education and some boards of education. Needless to say, the ratings weren’t sky-high.In the 1960’s Radio and Television Arts students were required to produce and broadcast live programming for CJRT. This included writing and producing half-hour radio dramas, complete with sound effects and music. I know about this because I had to do one myself. Plenty of sweat was involved. <CJRT control room photos are from Ryerson University’s Archive>Making a long story short – in the 1990’s, along came Mike Harris and his Progressive Conservative provincial government. He cancelled funding for CJRT-FM.  Suddenly, the station had to fend for itself, and that’s when independent JAZZ-FM91 was really born.These days the station promotes live concerts, is funded largely by donations, and reaches a wider audience than ever. In a way, Mike Harris did ‘the little station that could’ a real favour.

NEWS FOR THOSE STUCK ON FM RADIO – AM RADIO IS STILL ALIVE & WELL IN NORTH AMERICA

I grew up with AM radio, worked in it for some time, and love its ‘reach’.  <ABOVE – my grand mother’s Westinghouse, 1946, made in Hamilton, AM & Short Wave, stands beside my bed> Unlike FM, which is usually tied to its home market, AM’s signal can go almost anywhere, within reason. For instance, TORONTO’s CFZM, 50,000 watts, clear channel, reaches a vast audience in Ontario and the northern American states. <ABOVE – my Telefunken AM/FM radio, sat dormant for two years, but surprisingly remained fully functional.  It’s been part of the family since 1970.><And this little guy by TIVOLI is in charge of the kitchen.  It’s on AM every night – while I’m washing dishes.> FOR THOSE who really love AM, there’s a celebratory tribute on YouTube. It features Medium Wave channels from 530 kHz to 1700 kHz, with an emphasis on New England. Canadian AM outlets on the site – CKGM, Montreal, 50,000 watts; CJBC (French), Toronto, 50,000 watts; CHML, Hamilton; CHOK, Sarnia, 10,000 watts; CJEU, Gatineau (French); CKDO, Oshawa; CHHO, Toronto; & CHLO, Brampton, Ontario. Thanks to PETE BYERLEY for sampling AM stations right across the band. “TRIBUTE TO A CENTURY OF RADIO BROADCASTING” – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iKRZJ5uO2Mw&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2XcSmV9-wBU1MkV0Pagtc_E9AIrXqIqw6-oLY5cdgsnoVm-OhbSwLirt4