“MISSING LINK” IS NO LONGER MISSING – 22 KM. WATERFRONT BIKE TRAIL IS NOW COMPLETE

The “gap” between two sections of the Martin Goodman Trail has now been closed. – completing the intersections between Leslie Street and the Outer Harbor Marina. The project is part of Waterfront TORONTO’s ‘Quick Starts’ program, which includes several projects along the waterfront. Along the route, riders will pass a resting area, habitat enhancements, low-impact stormwater management features, and a mix of native trees and shrubs. – UrbanToronto.ca

Advertisements

RYERSON UNIVERSITY IN TORONTO’S DOWNTOWN CORE IS “COALESCING” ITS SPRAWLING CAMPUS

Over several years I’ve watched Ryerson University assemble an assortment of buildings in TORONTO’s core, along Gerrard, Gould, Yonge, Church and Victoria streets. It’s a campus built mostly in an incremental manner, adapting nearby buildings one after another as the student population grew and grew.STORM CUNNINGHAM, author, publisher, advisor and a Ryerson lecturer in 2010, is often called the guru of the trillion-dollar global renewal trend. He has this to say about RYERSON – “It’s a campus that has profoundly revitalized a run-down section of TORONTO’s downtown, and they’ve done it without the destructive blank-slate approach so common amongst planners.”ABOVE – for instance, the Ontario Pharmacy Building on Gerrard Street East has now become Ryerson’s Centre for Urban Innovation. “That’s unique, especially when one considers how many universities (mostly here in the United States) purposely allowed—even encouraged—surrounding neighbourhoods to go into decline, so they could scoop up cheap real estate to expand their campus.” – Storm Cunningham<ABOVE – a photo taken by Storm Cunningham in 2010, shows a derelict building making way for a student technology centre on Yonge Street.>Cunningham began writing ‘The Restoration Economy’ in 1996 when brownfields redevelopment, regenerative agriculture & restoration ecology emerged. It’s available on AMAZON.<GOULD STREET rendering – a permanent pedestrian-only zone is now being built from O’Keefe Lane to Bond Street.  It’s always been the centre of Ryerson’s campus.  WAY TO GO, RYERSON!>

U OF T’S DOWNTOWN CAMPUS TO GET N. AMERICA’S TALLEST MASS TIMBER & CONCRETE HYBRID BLDG.

A 14-storey academic tower will be built above the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport on the University of TORONTO’s St. George Campus. The tower will house the Rotman Executive Programs, and parts of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and the Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education. <RENDERING – Patkau Architects/MJMA Architects>

THE MASSEY TOWER OCCUPIES SPACE ONCE HOME TO THE COLONIAL TAVERN, YONGE ST. AT SHUTER

Topped off at 60 storeys above Yonge Street, neighbouring the Elgin & Winter Garden theatres, the Massey Tower has taken its place on TORONTO’s skyline. <PHOTO – Razz/Urban Toronto>

<View of balcony edges looking east, image by Craig White>

< Screens billow in the wind atop climbing project panels, image by Marcus Mitanis>

Designed by HARIRI PONTARINI ARCHITECTS and built for MOD DEVELOPMENTS, the company has donated a portion of its site to MASSEY HALL, Canada’s oldest concert hall, now undergoing a complete renovation. That extra space will provide an expanded loading dock, and a new 500-seat performance venue.

The Canadian Massey family was known for being patrons of the arts, and for manufacturing farm equipment for a large company that became Massey-Ferguson. Raymond Massey was a well-known actor; Vincent Massey was the 18th Governor-General of Canada; U of T’s Hart House was named for Hart Massey; Massey College is part of the family’s legacy – the list goes on. There’s also an equally successful branch of the family in the United States.