THERE ARE REASONS FOR VISITING THE CIBC BUILDING AND SQUARE, DURING EARLY STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT

CIBC SQUARE brings you an unparalleled experience in the centre of Toronto. CIBC Square (known during early stages of development as Bay Park Centre) is an office complex under construction in the South Core neighbourhood of Toronto. The complex, located on Bay Street south of Front Street, is a joint development of Ivanhoe Cambridge and Hines – and will become new global headquarters for the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) consolidating about 15,000 staff from several CIBC-buildings in Greater Toronto. The complex includes the Union Station Bus Terminal on behalf of Metrolinx for GO Transit and other bus services, connected directly to Union Station. The 2,900,000 square foot complex will consist of two towers. The South Tower (81 Bay Street) is now complete. It includes the Union Station Bus Terminal for regional GO Transit and inter-city bus services, replacing the former terminal on Bay Street. A pedestrian skybridge links the complex to the Scotiabank Arena and Union Station, expanding the PATH walkway system, south of the railway corridor to the One Yonge Street complex and other proposed developments farther east.

SOME GREAT NEWS FOR AIRCRAFT TRAVELLERS IN THE FUTURE – FOR TORONTO’S IN’TL PEARSON AIRPORT

From The Globe and Mail – There’ll be a temporary suspension of COVID-19 bottlenecks for travellers as the federal government announced it will stop mandating random testing of fully vaccinated travellers.The suspension will be in place until July 1, when the random testing will resume outside of airports.

The changes are the latest attempt by the government to ease the bottlenecks at airports, especially Toronto’s Pearson, that leads to hours-long waits, missed connections and cancelled flights. Ottawa has hired more security screening officers and is installing more customs kiosks.

 

Toronto, Canada – August 24, 2018: A plane is landing at Pearson International.

IMAGINE HOW IN LUCK YOU’D BE AS HEAD OF TORONTO’S PEARSON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT.

DEBORAH FLINT (that’s her on the right), born in Hamilton, Ontario, took the prize after running The Los Angeles International Airport after four years. When Ms. Flint took the reins in Toronto, she was faced with Pearson, along with the Pandemic, and Canada’s air travelers who’d been thrown into crisis. More than two years later she found herself leading the Airport, clogged terminals and passengers stuck on parked planes and parked luggage as in 112,000 passengers forced to wait before they were allowed off. Vancouver and Montreal had it bad, but Toronto was much more so. Because a busy summer was arriving, Ms. Flint had little time to fix the problems. But she said: “I always say the airport is the front door and the curb appeal reflects the capabilities and ambitions of a country . . . This is so important we reflect the best of Canada – a modern, innovative, capable country that welcomes business and travelers, tourists and immigrants.” So far she’s been doing it, and Pearson is achieving!

THE ST. LAWRENCE NORTH MARKET IS COMING ALONG WELL. – WE WONDER WHEN THERE’LL BE AN OPENING DATE

That’s the North Market under construction.  The photo above was taken by friends George Pyron and Jo Lamberton. The redevelopment of the North Market building will improve the utility of the Complex for vendors, visitors and shoppers. The St. Lawrence Market North will be situated north of Front Street East, and iwill be bounded by the  magnificent St. Lawrence Hall to the north, which is pictured below.

ON APRIL 21ST, 2022 TORONTO WELCOMED THE WORLD TO CELEBRATE “THE URBAN PAVILION IN REGENT PARK”

From Mitchell Cohen, President and CEO, The Daniels Corporation. Mr. Cohen wrote “It was a landmark moment in the history of our city, celebrating the spirit of community at the heart of the Regent Park revitalization. It was also a day to honour the late Councillor, Pam McConnell, who envisioned and nurtured the revitalization, and residents of the community – and took action to bring their dreams to life. The new Pavilion will be a place to learn with and from city-builders around the world. Private-sector partners brought enormous resources and expertise to the table. Post-secondary institutions have demonstrated the impact of being “on the ground.” The City of Toronto has embraced a public/private partnership model, enabling innovation and creativity across all sectors.   <To learn more about The Pavilion visit worldurbanpavilion.org.>

TORONTO’S RESTAURANT INDUSTRY WILL SOON BE WELCOMING MICHELIN’S DINING GUIDE TO CANADA

We’ve waited a long time for Michelin, the French company, known for its famous Three-Star rankings. Dining out in Toronto will soon be joining up with the Michelin guide books in 30 countries around the world. It’s the first time for Canada. The travel guides were created in 1899 by the French tire company and cleverly planned to promote more demand for cars. According to admired chefs a One-Star rating is a high honour.  Around the world, just 136 restaurants hold elusive Three-Star ratings. They’re not easy to come by.
According to Ann Hui, National Food Reporter for The Globe and Mail wrote “Federal Tourism Minister Randy Boissonnault and Toronto’s Mayor John Tory, will be among many others expected at Tuesday’s announcement, the sources said.”

PROBABLY MOST CANADIANS WOULD REMEMBER THE PHOTO BELOW, TAKEN ON APRIL 17, 1982.

Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, signed Canada’s Constitutional Proclamation on April 17, 1982 as Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau (father of Justin) looked on, along with Canada’s Minister of Justice,Jean Chrétien, and André Ouellet, Registrar General. The Proclamation brought Canada’s ‘Constitution Act, 1982′ into force, making our country wholly independent. <Photo from Canadian Press>

WHERE PARLIAMENT ST. MEETS DUNDAS ST. EAST YOU’LL FIND A GATHERING PLACE AND THE ARTS

Complete with Story Murals and the Toronto Council Fire Native’s Cultural Centre this community keeps on growing. The murals are connected with the Centre’s Spirit Garden Project, and it’s funded in part by Canadian Heritage and the Toronto Arts Council (TAC). Muralist Philip Cote <photo above> has painted Indigenous stories all across Toronto. Chances are you’ll come across Philip’s murals as this is a special time for our city’s “Year of Public Art” The Arts Council helps by animating the streets.  “Philip Cote, Anishinaabe-Algonquin, painter, historian, young spiritual elder and educator’s work could be found in public spaces big and small.  Thanks again, Philip.
Council Fire began in 1976 with a small group meeting for worship at St. Barnabas Church. They’d noticed increasing numbers of Native people were gravitating to the downtown core. Many were becoming homeless, and as a result began to attract and serve a client base of infants to seniors, as well as those new to Greater Toronto. The drop-in area in particular has become a popular place now to meet friends, have coffee and play bingo. Now the Council Fire is going through restructuring and revitalizing. The Cultural Centre in the future envisions providing the same level of quality support and services now as it grows along with the community.

‘HUGH’S ROOM LIVE’ MIGHT HAVE FOUND A NEW PLACE TO CALL HOME ON BROADVIEW AVENUE

The original ‘Hugh’s Room’ was established in Toronto’s West End Rochesvalles neighbourhood in 2001. It was a mixture of supper club and music room hosted by Odetta, Pete Seeger, Judy Collins, Richie Havens and Loudon Wainwright III, among many others. Then it began losing money in 2017 as it was turned into non-profit ‘Hugh’s Room Live’.  Three years later reality struck and Hugh’s left its home because the lease was beyond reach. The plan then became searching for space to purchase, and they thought they’d found one on Broadview Avenue, just south of Gerrard Street in the East End. One difficulty was dealing with property taxes, reduced 50% by the City for being a music venue for owners and operators.   Hugh’s’ had to face this until he had occupied the new building for one year. Raising $2-million would be a challenge for anyone these days, and surviving on arts music organizations that meant planning to do something innovative. If all works well a retired carpenter, Andrew Smith, devoted himself to live music, and was making miniature city music venues. He named one of them the old Hugh’s Room and some other silent venues with the name ‘Toronto, Lost Music City’. Will Broadview’s old church be a success? This may well be a triumph! There’s been good luck before for Hugh’s and there might be plenty more coming.

DOWNTOWN PROGRESS IN TORONTO CENTRE WITH HELP FROM CITY COUNCILLOR KRISTYN WONG-TAM

 

From Councillor Wong-Tam – “Over the last 12 months the Toronto Centre team responded to over 5,000 resident service requests. We launched several local campaigns – protecting tenant’s rights, saving small businesses, advancing cultural designation for the Church-Wellesley Village; and successful charge for Yonge/TOmorrow, and of course there’s more.”1) – Massey Hall Revitalization after 3 years. The entire revitalization will soon be part of a bigger facility called The Allied Music Centre, featuring a multi purpose, multi stage performance and education complex. 2) – Then there’s The  Downtown East Action Plan to get elevated levels of service to systemic issues such as neighbours’ homelessness, mental health and addiction crises, new funding for affordable and addition services – as well there’s needle pick-ups, and more Parks Ambassadors in a strong network across the ward. 3) – The Ontario brand of a much-needed new subway line proposed by the province, connecting The Science Centre to Exhibition Place – a long distance between those two. There’ll be 15 stations, including three in Toronto Centre. 4) – Improvements to the Glen Road Bridge and Tunnel across the Rosedale Valley Ravine. Work is expected to begin imminently and will last two years. 5) – The North Market Redevelopment is now underway! The St. Lawrence Market complex has been a city landmark for more than 200 years. It’s one of the most valuable historic sites in Toronto. Expected to be operational in 2023. 6) – And a few more . . . . Revitalization plan for Dundas and Sherbourne neighborhoods; St. James Town food hub; plus an Indigenous Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. 22,000 square feet of office space downtown at 200 Dundas Street East. It will be the largest Indigenous innovation hub in the world.  And there you more or less have it. Thanks to City Councillor Kryistyn Wong-Tam, Ward 13, Toronto Centre.