‘WHOLE LOT OF BREAKIN’ GOIN’ ON’ – NIGEL “SUGAR POP” WALTERS, EARL HAIG COLLEGIATE, 1984

Nigel “Sugar Pop” Walters, an 18-year-old student at Earl Haig Collegiate, shows off his scissor kick during a headstand. A few days after this photo was taken by the Toronto Star, “Breakdance ’84”, TORONTO’s first ever high school street dance show was held at Riverdale Collegiate.

<PHOTO – Tony Bock, TORONTO Public Library collection>

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24 HOURS A DAY, TORONTO PUBLIC LIBRARY’S ‘DIAL-A-STORY’ IS ON THE LINE AT 416-395-5400

TORONTO PUBLIC LIBRARY is the world’s busiest public library system. Every year, more than 16-million people borrow about 30-million items from 99 branches. One of their services is ‘Dial-A-Sory’ for children under 12.

For a multi-lingual/cultural city like this one, stories are made available in fifteen languages – including English, French, Cantonese, Gujarati, Italian, Mandarin, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish, Somali, Tamil and Urdu. Storytime readers have included library volunteers, Blue Jays players, actors and National Ballet dancers.

ANDREW DO says learning English as child was made easier through the ‘Dial-a-Story’ program. <(Moe Doiron – photo>

What better way for children (or adults) to learn another language or improve on the one he or she speaks. All you need is a phone. It’s free. ‘Dial-a-Story’ was created in 1989 by a consortium of libraries in Caledon, Vaughan, Brampton and North York. With amalgamation, the TORONTO Public Library took over the service in 1998.

“CORONER” HAS BECOME CBC TELEVISION’S HIGHEST-RATED NEW DRAMA SERIES LAUNCH

Co-produced by Muse, Back Alley & Cineflix & shot in TORONTO, “CORONER” has become CBC’s highest-rated drama series launch in four years. NUMERIS, the Canadian audience measurement organization, confirmed that the series reached two-million in Canada and delivered an average minute audience of more than one-million viewers for each episode on CBC television.

Dr. Jenny Cooper (played by actress Serinda Swan) investigates suspicious, unnatural, or sudden deaths in TORONTO. In the photo above Dr. Cooper is shown extracting a foot from a car grill. (Somebody’s got to do it.) 
In the United Kingdom the series premiered as Universal TV’s highest-ever rated series launch.
“’Coroner’ has struck a chord with viewers in Canada and the UK, which is a testament to the series’ outstanding cast and creative team and the authenticity of its themes and characters,” said Sally Catto, General Manager, Programming, CBC.

PREMIER DOUG FORD CALLS TORONTO ”THE BUBBLE”, AND TO MY WAY OF THINKING HE’S SPOT-ON

I’m sure the premier’s comment was meant to garner approval and votes in a speech he recently made before a Rural Ontario Municipal (ROMA) conference. DOUG FORD compared residents of TORONTO “the bubble”, with Ontario’s “real people” in other parts of the province.

TORONTO is indeed ‘the bubble’ for Ontario and – for that matter, the country itself. It’s the financial centre, economic engine, largest city, transit hub, technology centre, a multicultural nirvana, top television & movie-making production centre, with a few million taxpaying residents, four daily newspapers, two airports, four universities, five concert halls, pro hockey, baseball and basketball teams, two opera companies, at least five major hospitals, Canada’s largest zoo, second largest art gallery . . . and a premier who seems to wish he was mayor.

“Ford lives in the “bubble”, his daughter sells cannabis oil in the “bubble”, almost 3 million of us live in the “bubble”. There is only one person I wish didn’t live in this “bubble” with me and that’s Doug Ford!” – HEATHER CORRIVEAU, retired art teacher

<Our TORONTO is not called The Big Smoke for nothing.>

“ATLANTIC CANADA’S FOOD GUIDE” BY CARTOONIST MICHAEL DE ADDER, HALIFAX HERALD, NOVA SCOTIA

Fish and chips, shrimp, jigg’s dinner, oysters, donairs with sauce on the side, cod tongues, fried pepperoni, poutine rapee, fried clams, salmon, lobster, tomalley, Digby scallops, rappie pie, apple pie, seal flipper pie, partridgeberry pie, toutons, molasses, strawberries, dulse, blueberry grunt, mustard pickles, bakeapples, cranberries, apples, potatoes, luskinikn (aka four cent bread) . . . and beer.

MICHAEL DE ADDER – “So I couldn’t fit everything on here – i.e. fishcakes, bologna, fish and brewis, timbits . . . etc.”

Meanwhile, the new Canada Food Guide’s cover shows an image of a plate, half of it covered with fruits and vegetables. The other half is divided into whole grains and “proteins,” a new category that contains meat, dairy and plant-based foods such as chickpeas and tofu.

The online Canada Food Guide from the Government of Canada – https://food-guide.canada.ca/en/

THE SONY CENTRE WILL BE NO MORE – AS OF SEPTEMBER/2019 IT’LL BE RENAMED ‘MERIDIAN HALL’

In the 1960’s it opened as the O’Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts <PHOTO ABOVE>, then it was called the Hummingbird Centre . . . then the Sony Centre, and now a $30.75-million deal has been made with the Meridian Credit Union to rename this newly renovated, 2,500-seat theatre Meridian Hall.

Civic Theatres TORONTO, which runs the St. Lawrence Centre, Sony Centre and the Toronto Centre for the Arts, is changing its name as well. In future, it will be called TOLive. Civic Theatres was created in 2015 to find ways to improve these three underperforming theatres.

Taken together, in 2018, there were 613 performances, with over 493,000 attendees. The 2019 budget is growing to $28.1 million — almost $4 million over 2018 — while the organizations subsidy remains $5.3 million, which is down $600,000 from 2017.

<O’KEEFE CENTRE OPENING NIGHT for ‘Camelot’, pre-Broadway, 1960’s>