ANNE MURRAY, MY FAVOURITE NOVA SCOTIAN, WILL NOT BE A FLORIDA ‘SNOWBIRD’ THIS WINTER

ANNE would normally be soaking up the Florida sunshine, but she’s giving it a miss this year. enjoying her new HALIFAX home instead. “If you have to be isolated, I’m in a great spot”, the ultimate Haligonian told CP24 News. “I’m right on the water … you really are in touch with nature. Lots of birds, changing of the trees and boats. I feel like I’ve won the lottery.”  Having sold her place in Markham, Ontario, the 75-year-old decided to get back to her friends and family Down East. “I thought about it for a long time … and it felt like the right thing to do. Now that I’ve been here for a year and a half, I know it was.” Anne grew up in the mining town of Springhill, not far from Halifax. These were her roots, but her music career pulled in other directions – despite the urge to return back home. “There seems to be a huge magnet down here,” she said.Achievements <PHOTO – from the Anne Murray Museum> – first Canadian female solo singer to top the U.S. charts; first to earn a gold record for her song “Snowbird.”; four Grammy Awards and 24 Junos (a record).Her latest recording, “The Ultimate Christmas Collection,” released earlier this month, repackages 22 songs that made her part of the Christmas spirit and concerts. “They were such happy times,” she said. “People would sing at the top of their lungs and it was just fabulous, like a great big sing-along.” My only connections with Anne – we both grew up 16 miles from each other; the Cumberland Coal Mines in Springhill employed my father; and my mother thought visiting the Anne Murray Museum was the greatest idea. Which it was. Mom worked in an Amherst hardware store, and Anne’s mother would drop by occasionally. The two women chatted a bit, and my mother once remarked “You must be very proud of your daughter.”. . . . “Yes,” came a one-word reply.

MUCH OF TORONTO IS IN LOCKDOWN FOR 28 DAYS AS OF MONDAY, NOV. 23/2020. BE PREPARED!

LARGE THEATRES
*Berkeley Street Theatre, 26 Berkeley Street, http://www.canadianstage.com
*Bluma Appel Theatre, 27 Front Street East, http://www.canadianstage.com
*CAA (formerly Panasonic) Theatre, 651 Yonge St., http://www.mirvish.com
*Elgin Theatre, 189 Yonge Street, http://www.ticketmaster.ca
*Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay W., http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com/venues/fleckdancetheatre/
*Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts (Opera House), 145 Queen St. W., http://www.coc.ca
*Princess of Wales Theatre, 300 King St. W., http://www.mirvish.com
*Royal Alexandra Theatre, 260 King St. W., http://www.mirvish.com
*Sony Centre for the Performing Arts, 1 Front St. E., http://www.sonycentre.ca
*Streetcar Crow’s Theatre, 345 Carlaw Av., http://www.crowstheatre.com
*St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts, 27 Front St. E., http://www.stlc.com
*Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge St., http://www.tocentre.com
*Winter Garden Theatre, 189 Yonge Street, http://www.ticketmaster.ca
*Young Centre for the Performing Arts, Distillery District, http://www.soulpepper.ca
*Young People’s Theatre, 165 Front Street East, https://tickets.youngpeoplestheatre.ca/TheatreManager/1/online
MORE THEATRES
*Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley Street, http://www.alumnaetheatre.com
*Bad Dog Comedy Theatre, 875 Bloor Street West, http://www.baddogtheatre.com
*Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, 12 Alexander St., http://www.buddiesinbadtimes.com
*Cahoots Theatre Company, staging diversity, 388 Queen St. E., http://www.cahoots.ca
*Coal Mine Theatre, 1454 Danforth Av., http://www.coalminetheatre.com
*Factory Theatre, 125 Bathurst Street, http://www.factorytheatre.ca
*Hart House Theatre, 7 Hart House Circle, University of Toronto, http://harthouse.ca/hart-house-theatre/
*Lower Ossington Theatre, 100a Ossington Ave., http://www.lowerossingtontheatre.com
*MacMillan Theatre, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto, http://www.music.utoronto.ca
*National Ballet of Canada, Four Seasons Centre, 145 Queen Street West, https://national.ballet.ca
*Red Sandcastle Theatre, 922 Queen St. E., http://www.redsandcastletheatre.com
*Second City, sketch comedy theatre that’s launched many careers, 51 Mercer Street, http://www.secondcity.com
*Shaw Festival Theatres, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, https://www.shawfest.com/
*Stratford Festival Theatres, Stratford, Ontario, https://www.stratfordfestival.ca/WhatsOn/ThePlays?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIhqTVruSJ2QIVV7nACh2_pA41EAAYAyAAEgKAZ_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
*Storefront Theatre, 955 Bloor Street West, pushes creative boundaries, an original, http://www.thestorefronttheatre.com
*Tarragon Theatre, 30 Bridgman Ave., http://www.tarragontheatre.com
*Theatre Centre, 1115 Queen St. W., http://www.theatrecentre.org
*Theatre Passe Muraille, 16 Ryerson Avenue, http://www.passemuraille.on.ca
*Toronto Dance Theatre, 80 Winchester St., Cabbagetown, http://www.tdt.org
*Yuk Yuk’s Comedy Club, 224 Richmond St. West, https://www.yukyuks.com/toronto
CONCERT HALLS
*Danforth Music Hall, 147 Danforth Av., http://www.thedanforth.com
*George Weston Recital Hall, 5040 Yonge Street, http://www.tocentre.com/theatres/george-weston-recital-hall
*Glenn Gould Studio, CBC Broadcasting Centre, 250 Front St. W., http://www.cbc.ca/glenngould
*Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay West, http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com
*Hugh’s Room, 2261 Dundas St. W., http://www.hughsroom.com
*Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor Street West, http://www.rcmusic.com
*Massey Hall, 178 Victoria Street, http://www.masseyhall.com
*Opera House, 735 Queen St. East, http://theoperahouse.ticketoffices.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI4P_S_OGJ2QIVlLjACh0D0QC9EAAYASAAEgJVj_D_BwE
*Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe Street, http://www.roythomson.com
*Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. W., http://www.trinitystpauls.ca
CENTRAL CITY CINEMAS
*Carlton, 9 screens, fully licensed, $5 Tuesdays, 20 Carlton Street, https://imaginecinemas.com
*Grand Gerrard Theatre, 1035 Gerrard St. East, independent, film screenings, live music, comedy, performance art, one of Toronto’s oldest cinemas, https://www.blogto.com/arts/2019/04/toronto-grand-gerrard-theatre/
*Hot Docs Ted Rogers, specializing in documentaries and films seldom shown in the multiplex, 506 Bloor Street West, https://www.cinemaclock.com/theatres/hot-docs-ted-rogers-cinema
*Market Square, 80 Front Street East, several screens, https://imaginecinemas.com/cinema/market-square/
*Mount Pleasant, 675 Mount Pleasant Road, big screen, 2nd run features, some European films, etc., https://www.cinemaclock.com/ont/toronto/theatres/mount-pleasant
*Ontario Science Centre Omnimax,770 Don Mills Road, https://www.ontariosciencecentre.ca/imax
*Paradise Cinema, 1006 Bloor Street West, newly restored, independent, an outstanding schedule of films old and new, https://paradiseonbloor.com/
*Regent, 551 Mount Pleasant Road, 2nd run features, big screen, https://www.cinemaclock.com/ont/toronto/theatres/regent
*Revue, 400 Roncesvalles Avenue, neighbourhood cinema, second-run, documentary & foreign features, http://www.revuecinema.ca
*Royal, documentaries, festivals, foreign, second-run features, 608 College Street, http://www.theroyal.to
*Scotiabank Toronto Imax (Cineplex), 259 Richmond Street West, multiplex & IMAX, 14 screens, http://www.imax.com/theatres/scotiabank-toronto-imax
*TIFF Bell Lightbox, 5 screens, movies that don’t play in the multiplex, for times and schedule go to http://www.tiff.net
*Varsity Cinemas (Cineplex), Manulife Centre, 55 Bloor Street West, 12 screens, https://www.cinemaclock.com/theatres/cineplex-varsity-vip
*Yonge-Dundas Cinemas (Cineplex), multiplex & IMAX, 26 screens, 10 Dundas Street East, http://www.imdb.com/showtimes/cinema/CA/ci25232552/CA/M6M1W6
******Complete movie times, Toronto cinemas, reviews, from NOW Magazine, a handy address – http://movies.nowtoronto.com/#/nowplaying
MUSEUMS IN & AROUND TORONTO
*Aga Khan Museum, 77 Wynford Drive, http://www.agakhanmuseum.org
*Art Gallery of Hamilton, 123 King St. West, Hamilton, http://www.artgalleryofhamilton.com
*Art Gallery of Mississauga, http://www.artgalleryofmississauga.com
*Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas Street West, http://www.ago.ca
*Bata Shoe Museum, only two in the world, 327 Bloor St. West, http://www.batashoemuseum.ca
*Black Creek Pioneer Village, heritage museum, partly outdoors, 1000 Murray Ross Parkway, http://www.blackcreek.ca
*Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace, Toronto’s castle, http://www.casaloma.ca
*Fort York National Historic Site, 250 Fort York Boulevard, http://www.fortyork.ca
*Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Arts, 111 Queen’s Park, http://www.gardinermuseum.on.ca
*Hockey Hall of Fame, 30 Yonge Street, http://www.hhof.com
*Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, University of Toronto, 7 Hart House Circle, http://www.arts.utoronto.ca/galleries.htm
*Mackenzie House Museum, 82 Bond Street, interprets Victorian life of the 1860’s, 416-302-6915
*McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinburg, http://www.mcmichael.com
*Metropolitan Toronto Police Museum & Discovery Centre, 40 College St., http://www.torontopolice.on.ca/museum
*MZTV Museum of Television, 64 Jefferson Ave., Liberty Village, http://www.mztv.com
*Ontario Science Centre, 770 Don Mills Road, http://www.ontariosciencecentre.ca
*Power Plant, Harbourfront Centre, 231 Queens Quay West, free, http://www.thepowerplant.org
*Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada Museum & Archives, https://www.qormuseum.org
*Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queens Park, http://www.rom.on.ca
*Ryerson Image Centre (RIC), 33 Gould Street, large photography gallery, free admission, http://www.ryersonimagecentre.ca
*Spadina House Museum and gardens, 235 Spadina Rd., 416-392-6910, https://www.toronto.ca/explore-enjoy/history-art-culture/museums/spadina-museum/
*Textile Museum of Canada, 55 Centre Street, http://www.textilemuseum.ca
*Varley Art Gallery of Markham, 216 Main Street, Markham, http://www.varleygallery.ca

CITY CENTRE ART GALLERIES
*A Space, established contemporary, 401 Richmond St. West, http://www.aspacegallery.org
*Barbara Edwards Contemporary, 1069 Bathurst Street, http://www.becontemporary.com
*Bay of Spirits, 156 Front St. West, First Nations art, http://www.bayofspirits.com
*Canadian Sculpture Centre, 500 Church Street, http://www.cansculpt.org
*Christopher Cutts, 21 Morrow Avenue, http://www.cuttsgallery.com
*Clint Roenisch, 190 St. Helens Avenue, contemporary, avant-garde, http://www.clintroenisch.com
*Corkin Gallery, 7 Tank House Lane, Distillery District, http://www.corkingallery.com
*Daniel Faria, contemporary, converted warehouse, 188 St. Helens Avenue, http://www.danielfariagallery.com
*Diaz Contemporary, 100 Niagara Street, http://www.diazcontemporary.ca
*Koffler Gallery, Artscape Youngplace, 180 Shaw Street, http://www.kofflerarts.org
*Mercer Union, contemporary art, 1286 Bloor St. West, http://www.mercerunion.org
*Mira Godard, 22 Hazelton Avenue, long-established, Canadian & international artists, http://www.godardgallery.com
*Olga Korper, 17 Morrow Avenue, long-established, http://www.olgakorpergallery.com
*Propeller Centre for the Visual Arts, 30 Abell Street, founded in 1996, http://www.propellerctr.com
*Sandra Ainsley, 100 Sunrise Avenue #150, leading dealer in contemporary glass, http://www.sandraainsleygallery.com
*Stephen Bulger, 1356 Dundas St. West, long-established photography gallery, http://www.bulgergallery.com
*Thompson Landry Gallery, 32 Distillery Lane, Distillery District, specializes in Quebec art, both contemporary & the masters, http://www.thompsonlandry.com
LGBTQ COMMUNITY INFO
*(ArQuives), formerly the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives, 2nd largest in the world, 34 Isabella Street, http://www.clga.ca
*Legit, 2nd Thursday monthly, immigration legal counsel, 519 Centre, 519 Church Street, http://www.legit.ca
*Metropolitan Community Church (MCC), 115 Simpson Avenue, just above Gerrard St. East, http://www.mcctoronto.com
*Out and Out, LGBTQ outdoors club, http://www.outandout.ca
*Pink Pages, gay, lesbian, trans, bi, leather, queer directory, http://www.thepinkpagesdirectory.com
*ProudFM 103.9, Toronto’s LGBTQ radio station, http://www.proudfm.com
*Rainbow Railroad, a charity which helps individuals in countries where being LGBTQ invites violence, imprisonment or even death, http://www.rainbowrailroad.ca
*Righteously Outrageous Twirling Corps, http://www.rotctoronto.com
*Xtra magazine, gay news from Toronto, Vancouver & Ottawa, http://www.xtra.ca/toronto.aspx<‘TAKE ME TO YOUR LEADER’ . . . . “Did I come at a bad time?”, editorial cartoon by BRIAN GABLE, Globe and Mail, November 24/2020><STUFFING THE TURKEY WITH SOUR GRAPES, editorial cartoon by MICHAEL DE ADDER, The Chronicle, Halifax, Nova Scotia>

F.Y.I. – WE OFTEN TAKE THE ARTS FOR GRANTED, EVEN AS THEY NOURISH CANADIAN CITIES

SIMON HOUPT in The Globe and Mail makes it clear that the art sector contributes billions of dollars to municipal economies across Canada. Some of his Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver numbers are eye-popping.TORONTO – the art sector annually contributes an estimated $11.3-billion to the city’s GDP.VANCOUVER and British Columbia, both in the creative industry, bestow $6.6-billion.MONTREAL experienced a 21.7% drop due to Covid-19, including arts, entertainment and sports; TORONTO dropped 23.3%.There’s been a 26.3% drop in CALGARY due to the pandemic. (Conference Board of Canada)94% of Canadians believe the arts make a difference in their communities (Canada Council Annual Report 2019-2020)CANADA’S CULTURE INDUSTRIES contributed $56-billion to the country’s gross domestic product, representing roughly 655,000 jobs.Arts experiments worldwide are happening, and searches are on finding new audiences and different ways of delivering art forms to them. Recently I watched on PBS a one-man play ‘live’ from Detroit, and it worked extremely well. ‘Broadway to Obscurity’ had a sharp script and that, combined with a well-prepared actor, ERIC GUTMAN, made the evening.  So it can be done. <Photo – Detroit Public Theatre>

PHOTO #12 – ‘RADIO-GARDEN’ – NOV. 9/2020 – ENJOY HUNDREDS OF RADIO STATIONS WORLDWIDE

The Dutch have come up with a fantastic service based in Amsterdam & Hilversum which broadcasts radio stations from all over the world – across Canada, the USA, Britain, Ireland, Australia, Scotland, France etc.  Just type in Radio-Garden and you’re set to go. This non-profit digital research project was developed from 2013 to 2016, by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision; the Transnational Radio Knowledge Platform; and five other European universities. It takes no time to begin using the service – Tune into Radio-Garden, follow the globe; choose your location; click on the tiny green dots; and thousands of radio stations worldwide will be at your service. It’s free.

THE PUMPKIN IS A NORTH AMERICAN NATIVE, DATING BACK AS EARLY AS 7,500 TO 5,000 B.C.

Pumpkin patches can be found all over Canada and the United States. They’re very versatile when it comes to pies and other desserts; some grow into amazing sizes, with the largest up to a ton; raw pumpkins provide food energy – an excellent source when eaten daily; and on Hallowe’en they’re in entertainment mode. The kids love them, and so do TORONTO’s black squirrels, who tear them apart and chew them up.

 

CBC’S TELEVISION SERIES ‘SCHITT’S CREEK’ TOOK HOME 9 EMMYS, AN ALL-TIME RECORD

In the first half-hour of ABC’s telecast, the Canadian television series ‘Schitt’s Creek’ was busy accumulating Emmy Awards.  In all major comedy categories the Canucks delivered a wipe-out.  Top acting awards went to Catherine O’Hara, Eugene Levy, Dan Levy and Ottawa’s own Annie Murphy.  Photos above from the Ottawa Citizen, September 21/2020>

MOVIES ARE BACK – CINEPLEX OPENS 164 CINEMAS, 1,887 SCREENS & 10 ENTERTAINMENT COMPLEXES

Cineplex has been gradually opening cinemas over a few weeks, but has now gone for the whole lollipop.  Movies offered so far  on TORONTO screens, ahead of the United States – a very rare occurrence.Cineplex believes the return of all its cinemas is the first of the world’s major film exhibitors reopening across an entire network. <PHOTO – BNN Bloomberg>

THE ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO IS BACK IN BUSINESS AGAIN – WITH SEVERAL EXHIBITIONS

The AGO has been open to the general public since July 23, so now everyone is welcome.  Book your timed-entry tickets in advance before arriving at the Gallery. There’s a limit to the number of people permitted inside at any one time to allow for physical distancing.  Best of all, you won’t have to stand very long in a lineup. The cleaning schedule has been increased, and staff will be disinfecting high touch and traffic areas multiple times a day. CURRENT EXHIBITIONS – Until November 8th, ‘Illusions: The Art of Magic’; Diane Arbus: Photographs 1956-1971; PLUS – ‘Picasso: Painting The Blue Period’.And on the lower level, The Thomson Ship Model Collection. Unique in Canada and considered to be one of the finest private collections of ship models in the world.The models span 350 years, combining exquisite craftsmanship and maritime technological and cultural history. Opening hours – Thursday through Sunday, 10:30 am to 5:00 pm. Address – 317 Dundas Street West. For more information go to – https://ago.ca/welcome-back

COULD DRIVE-IN THEATRES BE A FILL-IN ANSWER TO CINEMAS – DURING THIS PANDEMIC?

In all of Canada there are only 52 drive-in theatres left, down from 250. In the United States there are 336, where there once were 4,000. Surprisngly there are quite a few drive-ins scattered around the Greater TORONTO Area.  For a different kind of movie experience – watching the sun go down and seeing a first-run feature on a giant screen – add a ‘drive-in night out’ to your bucket list.<The Mustang Drive-In, GUELPH>  Today there are drive-ins in Toronto, Hamilton, Barrie, Newmarket, London, Guelph, Oakville, Newmarket and Port Hope. In the not-so-distant past the city by itself had 10 of them, but with urban sprawl, increasing land values, and $80,000 to install one digital projector, most have found the operating costs crippling.<Port Hope Drive-In was built in 1952.  It’s still going strong.  PHOTO – Terry Lagler>  “I can’t make a drive-in look sexy at two in the afternoon. But when the sun goes down, and the kids are on the swings, and you can smell the popcorn and the neon comes alive, it really is quite special.” – BRIAN ALLEN, president of Premier Operating Drive-Ins<The Polson Pier driving range and drive-in, Port Lands, TORONTO>

JUNE MAY BE PRIDE MONTH, BUT THERE’LL BE NO PARADE THIS YEAR THANKS TO COVID-19

When it comes to Pride Parades TORONTO has produced dillies year-after-year. But as the song says “you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone”. And this year it’s gone.  The annual parade, which attracts hundreds of thousands every year was set to be held on June 28th.  Not this year. BUT WE’RE NOT ALONE –  Pride parades have been cancelled in Chicago, Edmonton, Vancouver, Kamloops, Washington DC, Auckland, Boston, Wellington, and New York City – among others.