SOUP’S ON AT THE ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO – BUT YOU WON’T SEE IT UNTIL AT LEAST LATE SUMMER

The Gallery is in lockdown, like so many other institutions, and will probably stay that way until at least the end of July. Philanthropists Jim and Margaret Fleck bought ANDY WARHOL’s ‘Campbell’s Soup I’ series in the 1970‘s from The Factory, America’s epicentre of Pop Art. Understandably the work opened up a huge debate on what can be classified as art.AGO Director and CEO, STEPHAN JOST, says this is the only complete series of Andy Warhol’s soup cans to be found in a public institution. Each piece of the 32 canvases is different, and Warhol’s errors make them so close to art that they become art.

TORONTO’S WARTIME HOUSES HAVE BECOME UNAFFORDABLE IN TODAY’S REAL ESTATE MARKET

<NORTH YORK wartime housing, 1967>. Between 1941 and 1947 a crown corporation called Wartime Housing Limited built thousands of houses across Canada for war workers, veterans and their families. These Wartime Houses became some of Canada’s first suburban communities.Wartime Houses are iconic architectural forms — a rectangle with a triangle on top. They were part of a government initiative to provide affordable rental homes to working class people.<PHOTO ABOVE – NOW magazine>. There are three Wartime Housing sites in TORONTO. The houses are now privately owned, and many have been gentrified through additions and demolitions.<PHOTO – National Film Board>. Artist MEAGHAN HYCKIE – “It does feel strange not to be able to afford a house in the East York neighbourhood of small, Second World War-era homes I grew up in.  Does private home ownership and development result in a more livable city? Is a bigger house a better house? And what part should government play in suburban planning and building conservation?”<PHOTO – Wartime Housing in Windsor, Ontario>

‘WEIRD ILLUMINATED SKY PAINTINGS’ (W.I.S.P.’S) ARE CREATED WITH LED LIGHTS AND DRONES

Drones have been getting some pretty bad press lately.  But they can do other things besides dropping bombs or hunting down terrorists. In fact, a drone is capable of showing us the world as we’ve never seen it before. A new art form has appeared, using drones and LED lights to create trails of light and colour in the sky.Fortunately or unfortunately Transport Canada has put the kibosh on flying drones near airports, heliports and aerodromes, as well as night time flying by hobbyists. These are a few TORONTO W.I.S.P.’s captured before the ban went into effect.  You’ll no doubt recognize the CN Tower, the back side of the Art Gallery of Ontario, and the Sharp Centre for Design at OCADU.For much more information on TORONTO’s drones and W.I.S.P.’s check out this site – http://www.yongestreetmedia.ca/features/drones121514.aspx

ST. ANNE’S ANGLICAN CHURCH & THE GROUP OF SEVEN PAINTERS, 270 GLADSTONE AVENUE

On the outside St. Anne’s Anglican Church, 270 Gladstone Avenue, is rather grim, but inside it’s another story.In 1923, the painter, J.E.H. MacDonald, assembled a group of Canadian artists (unfashionable in church circles at the time), including Fred Varley, Frank Carmichael, other members of the famous Group of Seven, and sculptors Frances Loring and Florence Wyle.Together they created more than a dozen large paintings, decorative medallions and reliefs of the four evangelists.  Combined with the building’s vaulted roof and central dome in the Byzantine Greek Cross style, and stained glass from the original church on Dufferin Street, St. Anne’s became a sight to behold.  As it is to this day.The 154-year-old building is Canada’s only Byzantine Revival Anglican church. It’s patterned after ISTANBUL’s Hagia Sophia, and in 1998 was designated a National Historic Site.St. Anne’s has regular Sunday services, or you can arrange individual or group tours through the church office.  Coronavirus permitting.