TORONTO’S DESIGN EXCHANGE IS HOUSED IN THE OLD TSX STOCK EXCHANGE BLDG., 234 BAY STREET

Opened in 1994, The Design Exchange – or DX – is a non-profit library, archive, art gallery, museum and resource centre in TORONTO’s Financial District.  Formerly the TSX Stock Exchange, the DX building stores the permanent collection of Canadian Industrial Design, the Clairtone, Fred Moffat and Thomas Lamb Archives . . . and designer’s galleries open to the public.

Intact on the second floor, is the deco Trading Floor of the Old Stock Exchange, with its famous clock and spectacular murals by Charles Comfort (1900-1994), who also created the frieze on the building’s facade.

 The Design Exchange mounts regular exhibitions in the ground floor galleries. Some are free.  PHOTOS – Trading floor in colour, Miles Storey/torontoist; clock and “Gold” mural detail, http://www.seemsartless.com

<PHOTO – the Trading Floor when this was the TORONTO Stock Exchange>

Subway stop: KING, and walk to Bay, then south one block.

IN ‘A VIBRANT PAST’ HANNA KOSTANSKI BRINGS TORONTO ARCHIVAL PHOTOS TO LIFE WITH PAINT

<Scarborough Beach, 1915>

TORONTO archival photos have taken on a new life in a series of paintings by artist HANNA KOSTANSKI. Using Acrylics she’s painstakingly reanimated these old black and white’s. ‘A Vibrant Past: Toronto in the 20th Century’ will be on display in August at the Urban Gallery, 401 Richmond Street West. Opening reception – August 3.

<Bay Street at Adelaide, 1940’s>

HANNA KOSTANSKI lives in HAMILTON and works in TORONTO. She’s a 2007 graduate of OCAD University. Her work can be found in private and public collections, as well as several law offices, hotels and a hospital.

<Bloor Street West, 1958>

http://www.hannakostanski.com

<Yonge and Dundas, 1978>

A BLUE WHALE’S HEART IS SURE TO BE THIS YEAR’S MAIN ATTRACTION @ ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM

<PHOTO – Samantha Phillips>

The BLUE WHALE, world’s largest animal, has a heart that’s 4 feet wide, 3 & a half feet tall, and 3 feet thick. It pumps 150 litres of blood (40 gallons) per beat and weighs in at 400 pounds. This particular heart was taken from a whale that washed ashore in Rocky Harbour, Newfoundland.

<PHOTO – Lance McMillan>

David Hains in Metro News writes “4 months were needed to prepare the heart in nearly sixteen 200-litre barrels of formaldehyde. Technicians then dehydrated the heart using 22,000 litres of acetone, a process that took nearly 5 months. Then came dissection, reshaping and colouring.

“The ROM team shipped the heart to Gubener Plastinate in Germany to preserve and plastinate it, and then a team of six prepared it for shipping back to TORONTO.” The heart and the whale’s skeletal remains are on display until September 4 at the Royal Ontario Museum in TORONTO.

<PHOTO – Lance McMillan>

LORI BLONDEAU’S “ASINLY ISKWEW” IN DEVONIAN SQUARE PORTRAYS A POWERFUL ‘ROCK WOMAN’

Ryerson University has given over its Devonian Square during Scotiabank’s Contact Photography Festival to Lori Blondeau’s ‘Rock Woman’ (translated from the Cree language).

The images are adhered to 2-billion-year-old boulders transported from the Canadian Shield to downtown TORONTO. This points to issues of displacement, environmental preservation, indigenous history and connection to the land.

Adjacent to Devonian Square is the Ryerson Image Centre at 33 Gould Street. RIC is presenting three special exhibits, including photographs by Suzie Lake, which will continue until mid-August. Admission is free. Closed on Mondays. For the details go to http://www.ryerson.ca/ric