SOMEONE HAS TAKEN THE TIME TO CREATE A HYDRO POLE WORK OF ART ON MAJOR STREET

<Little things mean a lot.  Very elegant.>

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IN NEW YORK’S CHELSEA ‘TIL JULY 27 – 380 PIECES FROM THE PERLSTEIN COLLECTION & IT’S FREE

SYLVIO PERLSTEIN, 80, has been collecting avant-garde 20th and 21st century art, both masterpieces and curiosities, for more than five decades. “It was not a business. It’s not a collection,” he said. “In Portuguese, the word is ‘esquisito’, things that are strange and unusual.”

As a devotee of surrealism, Mr. Perlstein likes to buy early work, before an artist’s impulses are ossified. He pounces when he sees “something not normal”.

Three floors of Hauser & Wirth, just off Manhattan’s High Line are filled with art. Among the pieces – works by Man Ray, Magritte, Max Ernst, Donald Judd, Dora Maar, Keith Haring, Picasso, Edward Weston, Walker Evans, Bruce Nauman, Moholy-Nagy, etc.

The exhibition is free and nothing is for sale. You can easily spend a half-day taking it all in, and it could save you a visit to the Museum of Modern Art.

Hauser & Wirth, 548 West 22nd Street, Chelsea, New York City, 1-212-790-3900 – https://www.hauserwirth.com/hauser-wirth-exhibitions/14484-luta-continua-sylvio-perlstein-collection

“BIKE CITY” AT THE MARKET GALLERY HIGHLIGHTS TORONTO’S CYCLING HISTORY – UNTIL NOVEMBER 17TH

The Market Gallery occupies the second floor of the St. Lawrence Market (south building). Over many years, exhibits have focused on TORONTO and its lengthy history – from subways to jazz clubs to world wars – and now comes the bicycle and its impact on the city’s past.

On display – 13 TORONTO-made bikes; archival photographs, advertisements, posters and artifacts from private and public collections; the city’s cycling success stories, and our Bicycle Locking Ring and Post, created here and used in cities around the world.

Riding a bicycle in TORONTO can oftentimes be death-defying. As the city grows, we’re getting better at building and maintaining bike lanes, but there’s still a very long way to go.

City councillors should take some time to visit “BIKE CITY” at the Market Gallery, 95 Front Street East, Tuesday to Friday 10 am to 4 pm; Saturdays 9 am to 4 pm. Adults $8; seniors & youth $7.

<St. Lawrence Market (south) – the Market Gallery is on the second floor>

WATCHING THE PAINT DRY ON JARVIS STREET, AS SPANISH ARTIST OKUDA’S MURAL TAKES SHAPE

Coming very soon – a brightly coloured mural by Spanish street artist OKUDA, on a formerly blank wall, facing traffic-heavy Jarvis Street at Carlton. The project is a partnership between STEPS (a public art-funding charity), the City of TORONTO’s StreetART program, and the owners of Parkside Student Residences. The city will provide $50,000 as part of its Graffiti Management Plan.

Upon completion, the mural will look like this.

The Residences are housed in a former 1970’s-era Brutalist hotel, not far from the University of TORONTO, OCAD University, George Brown College and Ryerson University in or near downtown.

<ABOVE – street level on JULY 7TH>

<ABOVE – street level on JULY 10TH>

<ABOVE – the finished mural on July 13th. As you can see, several alterations were made from the rendering above. This mural has already become a new landmark, and can be seen clearly from several blocks away.>

MOMA MARKOVICH CAPTURED ONTARIO’S TRANSPORATION HISTORY – ONE PAINTING AT A TIME

There was plenty of subject matter, and painter MOMA MARKOVICH (1902-1977) took full advantage of it. During a 15-year career with Ontario’s Ministry of Transportation (MTO), the Serbian-born artist created 200 works detailing the province’s famous roads and bridges.

<SNOW REMOVAL, 1960’s>

<PAVING HIGHWAY 11 near Harty Cochrane District>

<‘PLANK ROAD – The Smooth Roadway>

<QUEEN ELIZABETH WAY, Canada’s first super highway>

<DE HAVILLAND BEAVER, the first all-metal bush plane designed & built in Canada>

<Nipigon Junction of Highway 17 and Hwy 11>

<IMAGE ABOVE – ‘Carrying Place’, Humber River>
One hundred of MOMA MARKOVICH’s paintings are in the Archives of Ontario. To see works on other subject matter from the Archives’ vast collection go to http://www.archives.gov.on.ca

GET YOUR FILL OF CANADA’S COMIC BOOK HEROES AT THE TORONTO REFERENCE LIBRARY UNTIL JULY 29

Scott Pilgrim, Captain Canuck, Nelvana, Superman, Johnny Canuck and Capitaine Kebec are just a few of the Canadian comic book heroes you’ll encounter on the walls and video screens in the TORONTO Reference Library’s TD Gallery, 789 Yonge Street.

Learn about the talented Canadians behind famous superheroes, including pioneering Superman artist JOE SHUSTER.

The TORONTO Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street, also has a super bookshop on the main floor. It’s worth a visit. GUIDED TOURS of the exhibit – every Tuesday at 2pm.