SOUP’S ON AT THE ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO – BUT YOU WON’T SEE IT UNTIL AT LEAST LATE SUMMER

The Gallery is in lockdown, like so many other institutions, and will probably stay that way until at least the end of July. Philanthropists Jim and Margaret Fleck bought ANDY WARHOL’s ‘Campbell’s Soup I’ series in the 1970‘s from The Factory, America’s epicentre of Pop Art. Understandably the work opened up a huge debate on what can be classified as art.AGO Director and CEO, STEPHAN JOST, says this is the only complete series of Andy Warhol’s soup cans to be found in a public institution. Each piece of the 32 canvases is different, and Warhol’s errors make them so close to art that they become art.

TORONTO’S WARTIME HOUSES HAVE BECOME UNAFFORDABLE IN TODAY’S REAL ESTATE MARKET

<NORTH YORK wartime housing, 1967>. Between 1941 and 1947 a crown corporation called Wartime Housing Limited built thousands of houses across Canada for war workers, veterans and their families. These Wartime Houses became some of Canada’s first suburban communities.Wartime Houses are iconic architectural forms — a rectangle with a triangle on top. They were part of a government initiative to provide affordable rental homes to working class people.<PHOTO ABOVE – NOW magazine>. There are three Wartime Housing sites in TORONTO. The houses are now privately owned, and many have been gentrified through additions and demolitions.<PHOTO – National Film Board>. Artist MEAGHAN HYCKIE – “It does feel strange not to be able to afford a house in the East York neighbourhood of small, Second World War-era homes I grew up in.  Does private home ownership and development result in a more livable city? Is a bigger house a better house? And what part should government play in suburban planning and building conservation?”<PHOTO – Wartime Housing in Windsor, Ontario>