HEAVY SNOW ON BALSAM AVE. IN THE BEACH NEIGHBOURHOOD – WILLIAM KURELEK (1927-77)

WILLIAM KURELEK RCA is one of Canada’s best known painters. The son of Ukrainian immigrant farmers, he grew up during the Great Depression on farms in Alberta and Manitoba. He worked in construction in Edmonton and Thunder Bay, and as a waiter at TORONTO’s Royal York Hotel. Books of his work have titles like ‘A Prairie Boy’s Summer’, ‘Lumberjack’, ‘The Last of the Arctic’ and ‘O Toronto’. Many of Kurelek’s paintings were produced to accompany children’s storybooks.

CAPE DORSET ARTIST, OOLOOSIE SAILA, MAKES THE FRONT PAGE OF TODAY’S SUNDAY NEW YORK TIMES

Over 3 pages (including the front page), CATHERINE PORTER writes an extensive article with pictures about Cape Dorset artist, OOLOOSIE SAILA, her son PALLU, and her debut Feheley Fine Arts show in TORONTO. <photo above – Feheley Fine Arts>

Life in CAPE DORSET on the heel of Baffin Island, is focused around art and artists. Like all 25 Inuit communities in NUNAVUT, the hamlet is completely isolated in winter where temperatures can reach minus 40 degrees. Summer isn’t so bad. It’s 1,425 kilometres from TORONTO. Ooloosie’s second son, PALLU, was born with serious health issues and needs regular trips to the nearest children’s hospital in Ottawa, which isn’t cheap. Cape Dorset has a population of about 1,400, and a goodly number of them are binge drinkers. There’s an ice rink and a busy jail, no movie theatre or downtown, and a general store which serves as a social hub. And the cost of food and necessities is sky high.  FEHELEY FINE ARTS has a vast collection of sculptures, paintings and lithographs by Cape Dorset Inuit artists. For images and detailed write-ups go to – https://feheleyfinearts.com/

LITTLE CANADA, ‘OUR HOME AND MINIATURE LAND’ IS A NEW ATTRACTION COMING TO #10 DUNDAS ST. E.

Opening in 2020, this magical journey of discovery across Canada could well be our city’s next big attraction. Under one roof you’ll be able to explore the nation in miniature – the sights, sounds and sometimes smells of the Great White North.A Little Canada passport will get things underway. <ABOVE – exploring TORONTO in winter><ABOVE – a tulip garden, possibly in OTTAWA><Much work has already been done on the project by those building the miniatures.>LAUNCHING IN 2020 – Little Niagara, the Golden Horseshoe, Toronto, Ottawa, Little North (now under construction), & Quebec.IN THE FUTURE – Montreal, the Prairies & the Rockies, the East Coast, History of Canada, and the West Coast.‘Little Canada’ is receiving a lot of attention. To find out much more check out the website – https://www.little-canada.ca/

THOUSANDS OF PREVIOUSLY UNSEEN PHOTOGRAPHS BY VIVIAN MAIER HAVE A NEW CHICAGO HOME

Collector JOHN MALOOF’s donation to the University of Chicago Library consists of both black-and-white and colour, large and small prints. Some are processed; some not. They were made by a woman who struggled for money her whole life, and lost ownership of her work in 2007, two years before her death at the age of 83, when the contents of her storage locker were auctioned off. That’s when John Maloof came in.This 1956 photo provided by the Estate of Vivian Maier & John Maloof Collection shows a self-portrait of Maier in a series of mirrors at an unknown location. New research shows the enigmatic nanny was obsessive about honing her skills as a photographer starting in 1950.  LAURA LETINSKY, a visual arts professor at the University of Chicago said “This is a visual diary of sorts of her life. And because so little was known about her while she was alive . . . you’re trying to piece together what she was thinking about and how she was thinking.”ABOVE – A Vivian Maier photograph, printed by her or at her direction, part of the new University of Chicago Library donation by John Maloof. Unpublished work © 2017 The Estate of Vivian Maier. All rights reserved.Two in-depth stories by STEVE JOHNSON about VIVIAN MAIER, her work, and the JOHN MALOOF donation, were published in The Chicago Tribune this year. To reach it go to – https://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/museums/ct-ent-vivian-maier-new-donation-university-chicago-0818-20190822-c5czvvvd3zdorbd6jyfcbxb46a-story.html

AT THE RYERSON IMAGE CENTRE – A HISTORY OF FEMALE GAZES IN AFRICAN PORTRAITURE

An extensive exhibit from The Walther Collection – ‘The Way She Looks’ – revisits the history of African portraiture through the perspectives of women – both in front of, and behind the camera.<photo above by Gabriel Lekegian, albumen, Egypt, late 19th century>  From the beginnings of colonial photography to the present day the exhibition includes nineteenth century prints, postcards, albums and cartes de visites within two galleries.<photo above – ‘Girl in Red’ by Yto Barrada, French Moroccan>  The exhibition continues until December 8/2019.<photo above – S.J.Moodley, South African (1922-1987)>The Ryerson Image Centre, 33 Gould Street, downtown, is open every day except Monday from 11 am (12 pm on weekends). Admission is free.

JUST RELEASED – A SET OF 3 COMMEMORATIVE STAMPS HONOURING THE LATE LEONARD COHEN

September 21st, 2019 would have been LEONARD COHEN’s 85th birthday. Unfortunately he is no longer with us. But Canada Post honoured him with a set of three stamps showing three periods of his illustrious music career. Given the posthumous nature of the series, designers opted for black and white images.MONTREAL-based design firm PAPRIKA said the stamps symbolize “the scope of his work, and the man himself, who was larger than life.”