TORONTO’S ‘PATH’ SYSTEM IS THE BIG DADDY OF SUBTERRANEAN PEDESTRIAN WALKWAYS

More than 50 buildings, 20 parking garages, 6 subway stations, 8 major hotels, Union Station, the CBC Broadcasting Centre, Hockey Hall of Fame, the Stock Exchange, Hudson’s Bay department store, Canada’s six banks, Roy Thomson Hall, the Rogers Centre, the CN Tower, City Hall, the Air Canada Centre and 1200 shops and services are all accessible via PATH.

About 5,000 people work in the tunnels themselves, and a few hundred thousand in the office towers above.

Altogether, TORONTO’s PATH network is 30 kilometres (19 miles) end-to-end-to-end. It contains 372,000 square metres (4 million square feet) of retail space. By comparison, the tunnel network in HOUSTON, Texas is approximately 6 miles (9.7 kilometres) long.

REMEMBERING THE TURBOTRAIN – HIGH-SPEED RAIL BETWEEN TORONTO & MONTREAL, 1968-84

It’s the closest Canada has ever come to high-speed rail.  The TurboTrain was one of the first tilting trains to enter service in both Canada and the United States.  The one above reached a top speed of 140 miles per hour, between Toronto and Montreal, in 1976.

<Concept drawing Canadian National>

ELECTRIC TROLLEY BUSES AND NEON LIGHTS – FRED HERZOG’S VANCOUVER IN THE 1950’S

Stuttgart-born FRED HERZOG is a master of colour photography.  After moving to VANCOUVER in 1953, he worked primarily with Kodachrome slide film to create a wonderful archive of that city, as it was in the 1950’s when neon was king.  His photography is in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada and the Vancouver Art Gallery, and he’s been the subject of numerous books.

FROM TROUT RIVER, NFLD. TO TORONTO – THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM’S ‘BLUE WHALE STORY’

The idea for an R.O.M. project began when two dead Blue Whales washed ashore at TROUT RIVER, Newfoundland in 2014.

The locals were understandably alarmed that this mammoth creature – the world’s largest mammal – could explode, become a danger to public health, or at least lie there reeking in the noonday sun. <PHOTOS ABOVE – NTV Television, Newfoundland>

TORONTO’s Royal Ontario Museum saw a rare opportunity, and after negotiating with the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans, dispatched a team to the east coast. The museum team disassembled the whale, which – as expected – was dirty, nauseating work. Imagine a 100-tonne sea creature baking away on the beach.

<The Blue Whale’s heart alone was almost the size of a Smartcar>

<PHOTO ABOVE – Kate Allen/Toronto Star>

The skeleton was loaded onto a truck and driven 1,580 miles to Trenton, Ontario, and from there to TORONTO, where it was readied for an exhibition ‘Out of the Depths: The Blue Whale Story’.  It’s now on at the Royal Ontario Museum, Bloor Street West at Avenue Road.

<PHOTO ABOVE – Tanja-Tiziana>

Information and lots of photos are available online at the Museum’s website – https://www.rom.on.ca/en/collections-research/research-community-projects/blue-whale

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, CANADA’S OLDEST NATIONAL NEWSPAPER, IS DIGITIZING ITS PHOTO LIBRARY

<Montreal Canadiens hockey player Jacques Plante in a face mask; PHOTO David Bier/Globe and Mail Archive>

These three press photos are from the photography archive (750,000 images in total) of the Globe and Mail. A good slice of our country’s history can be found therein. 25,000 pictures will go to the  Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada, and the remainder will be distributed to other institutions. As decades pass, these photos will become ever more valuable.

<Famed pianist Glenn Gould, ca1971; PHOTO Erik Christensen/Globe and Mail Archive>

<Jim Vipond, sports columist atop Patrick O’Connor, Irish wrestler from New Zealand; PHOTO Michael Burns/Globe and Mail Archive>

WORKS BY A SCULPTURAL REVOLUTIONARY @ ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO – PHOTOS BY ROSS WINTER

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Nils Jorgensen/REX Shutterstock (2478710e) Sir Anthony Caro with his sculpture 'Laughter and Crying', 2012 Sir Anthony Caro, Park Avenue Series press view, Gagosian Gallery, London, Britain - 06 Jun 2013 Internationally respected British abstract sculptor visits his exhibition ahead of the private view. The display presents new sculpture series of work which evolved while planning a large scale public sculpture for New York City

<Sir Anthony Caro with his sculpture Laughter & Crying, one of the Park Avenue series, shortly before his death in 2013; PHOTO – Rex Features>

In the 1960’s Anthony Caro (1924-2013) began making large, abstract assemblages out of prefabricated steel and aluminum meant to be installed directly on the ground. Four of them occupy one large gallery at the Art Gallery of Ontario until May 22/2017.

caro3Toward the end of his life Caro planned a series of gigantic sculptures for the median strip of Park Avenue in New York. The project was scuttled, but the steel pipes, beams and discs were re-used to create works in the AGO exhibit ‘Anthony Caro: Sculpture Laid Bare’.

caro4caro2