HOW GREAT IT IS WHEN CANADIAN STAGE SHARES ITS OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATRE WITH OTHERS

Canadian Stage is planning to make room for the much-anticipated return of live, in-person theatre, dance and music to Toronto this summer. It’s putting aside the normal Shakesperanean outdoor productions of the Bard – and instead share its 1,000-seat open-air Amphitheatre in High Park with a wide variety of local arts groups from the end of June/2021 into September. Most exciting will be full productions of a new Canadian musical; a new work by two-time Governor General’s Literary Award-winner Jordan Tannahill. A special performance beyond the Amphitheatre will use the entirety of High Park itself. All will be physically distanced, mask-wearing audiences up to 100 – with strict COVID-19 protocols on stage and off. Running times will be around 90 minutes. See the full Dream in High Park 2021 line-up. And there’ll be so much more.

THE CANADA COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS PRESENTS “IMPOSTOR CITIES” IN VENICE – UNTIL NOV. 21/2021

<PHOTO – The Canada Pavilion in Venice, transforming into movie mode> For a long time I’ve been watching Canadian cities stand-in for other places and cities across the United States and in many parts of Europe. We’ve been happily faking it, and filmgoers can seldom tell the difference from the real thing. Toronto often portrays parts of New York City, occasionally Tokyo, and was featured in the Academy Award winner ‘The Shape of Water’, parts of which were also shot in Hamilton, Ontario. Vancouver and Montreal masquerade as Moscow, Paris, and New York.  Alberta has helped depict the American West. ‘Impostor Cities’ celebrates Canada’s cities by being cinematic impostors, bringing attention to how our architecture is able to make appearances worldwide on the silver screen. ‘Impostor Cities’ poses the question: why are Canada’s buildings so good at doubling somewhere else in feature films? There’ll be fun to immerse visitors in this “impostor” experience – allowing visitors to consider what makes distinct Canadian architecture capable of blending into Paris and/or New York on the movie screen. This exhibition, the International Architecture Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, makes people aware that many film-famous buildings and spaces are really Canadian. It’s about our movie-making identity – we love it.

LITTLE CANADA, ‘OUR HOME AND MINIATURE LAND’ OPENS ON JULY 1ST, CANADA DAY

Toronto’s latest attraction will be receiving visitors at #10 Dundas Street East on July 1st, providing all is going well with the pandemic. Under one roof you’ll be able to explore our nation in miniature – the sights, sounds and sometimes smells of The Great White North. A Little Canada passport will get things underway.<ABOVE – exploring TORONTO in winter> <ABOVE – a tulip garden, possibly in OTTAWA> <Much work has already been done on the project by those who are building the miniatures.> LAUNCHING IN 2021 – Little Niagara, the Golden Horseshoe, Toronto, Ottawa, Little North (now under construction), and Quebec. IN THE FUTURE – Montreal, the Prairies & the Rockies, the East Coast, History of Canada, and the West Coast. To find out much more check out the website – https://www.little-canada.ca/ 

SOMETHING RARE IN THE AUTO WORLD – A MULTI-COLOURED ARLEQUIN, ONE OF ONLY 264

There once were only 264 Volkswagen Golf Arlequins in the world (probably fewer now), and at least one of them is in Toronto.  After two cross-country trips to Vancouver, this multi-coloured vehicle now makes it’s home here. Originally the series was created to tour International Auto shows.Based on the 1996 Golf GL platform, the Arlequin features a limited edition paint scheme, limited edition sport cloth seats, and silver-faced gauges.  Several different wheel options were available.  The Arlequins were produced by swapping body panels from four different coloured Golfs.  The base colour is not repeated on any of the other body parts.<PHOTO ABOVE – another kind of Volkswagen from the Odd Vehicle Society on Facebook>