I HAD NO IDEA THERE WERE NEWFOUNDLAND BUICKS – IN 1956 THEY WERE HOT SELLERS IN ST. JOHN’S

In the 1950s, most roads in Newfoundland were unpaved, rocky, and rough. In the capital city of St. John’s, a prominent dealership named Terra Nova Motors (which still exists today) sold a variety of brands – mostly GM marques – including, of course, the Buick.At the behest of Terra Nova’s dealer principal, General Motors flew a duo of Buick engineers to Newfoundland and were promptly taken on a 180 kilometre journey from their arrival point to the capital city.The Buick engineers were aghast. Their beautiful car was essentially uncontrollable on the bumpy and jagged highway. By all accounts, wheels pogoed up and down as the suspension flopped about like a freshly caught codfish. Cementing the problem were the number of Buicks suffering broken frames after just a short time on Newfoundland soil.Determined to solve the problem and repair Buick’s tarnished image, the GM engineers went back to Michigan and set to work developing a heavier than standard frame, specially tempered springs, and abnormally powerful shock absorbers. The changes worked, leading Buick to provide Terra Nova Motors with a few years’ worth of its opulent and newly stout two and four-door hardtop convertibles.

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THE ELGIN & WINTER GARDEN THEATRES ARE OVER 100 YEARS OLD & YOU CAN VISIT

One sits on top of the other.  On the bottom – the resplendent ELGIN, and on top – the WINTER GARDEN, with its pastel lamps and leafy bowers.  These are the last remaining double-decker Edwardian-era theatres in the world. 189 Yonge Street, above Queen.<PHOTOS ABOVE – The Elgin><PHOTO ABOVE – The Winter Garden>  This National Historic Site offers year-round tours – Thursdays at 5pm & Saturdays at 11am.  Adults $12; students and seniors $10. Cash only. No reservations required. Tours include samples from the vaudeville scenery collection, the Winter Garden’s original Simplex Silent Film Projector and a vaudeville-era dressing room.  Ontario Heritage Trust website – http://www.heritagetrust.on.ca

LARGEST COLLECTION OF CARIBBEAN PHOTOGRAPHY – 3,500 IMAGES – ACQUIRED BY TORONTO’S A.G.O.

<J.W. Cleary, Coconut Palms, Kingston Harbour, c. 1895>  NEW YORK’s Patrick Montgomery assembled over ten years a huge collection of historical photos from the Caribbean.<Valentine & Sons, A Boat on Kingston Harbour (variation), 1891>  Montgomery says “I was surprised how few (local historical societies) had photo collections…. So I started poking around and talking to dealers, and it turns out they did exist, but not in the Caribbean. The climate and economy [largely] didn’t support that kind of archive.”<Unknown photographer, Glendairy Prison Officials, Barbados, 1909> Thanks to $300,000 in support mainly from TORONTO’s Caribbean and Black community donors, the unique collection is now in the archives of the Art Gallery of Ontario.<Felix Morin, Coolie Woman, Trinidad, c. 1890><Felix Morin, Bananas, Trinidad, c. 1890>  The collection is distinctive in its reach, covering no fewer than 34 countries from 1840 through to 1940. (Canadian Art Magazine, June/2019)

TORONTO IS KNOWN FOR ITS “INDIVIDUALIZED” HOUSES – HERE ARE TEN CITY-WIDE EXAMPLES OUT OF MANY

<LESLIE & BOND STREETS><LITTLE COTTAGE, BRIGHT STREET, INDIE88 photo><CRAVEN ROAD HOUSE, Greenwood/Coxwell neighbourhood – TORONTO LIFE photo><TORONTO ISLANDS, photo – SANDRO GRANELLA><INTEGRAL HOUSE, Rosedale, PHILIP CASTLETON photo><TINY BUNGALOW – FLICKR><WOOD CAKE HOUSE, Clinton Street><SKINNY HOUSE – photo TORONTO STAR><HALF HOUSE, ST. PATRICK STREET, photo HUFFINTON POST><CASTLE HOME – MAYBOURNE ROAD, photo CTV NEWS>

THE INGENIOUS DUTCH HAVE CREATED A FLOATING DAIRY FARM – AND THE COWS SEEM TO APPROVE

 Ever concerned about rising flood waters and the environment, the Dutch are showing the world how food production can be less vulnerable to climate change. A dairy farm in the city of ROTTERDAM, created by Peter van Wingerden and Minke van Wingerden of BELADON is home to 32 cows.The cows are fed with grass from ROTTERDAM’s playing fields and golf courses, potato scraps, brans and brewers grains. Their manure is used as a natural fertilizer. The slurry is carried away by a robot.These Dutch cows each have their own stalls with rubber floors; they can wander back and forth to dry land to stretch their legs; a robot milks them as they choose; an automatic belt feeder distributes their food.Rising sea levels concern all Netherlanders. They’ve had the flooding experience several times over. “The available area of fertile agricultural land does not grow along with the world population. In fact, fertile land is becoming increasingly scarce,” says the BELADON team. A floating chicken ranch may be upcoming in the forseeable future. <Amy Frearson/Dezeen>