STENCILLED ON A SIDEWALK IN RVERDALE PARK – “PLASTIC PLANET – THE CHOICE THAT LASTS FOREVER”

Furthermore – “TRASH EQUALS MURDER” – and “a duck may be somebody’s mother” (they’ve been known to eat trash and plastic).

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FRED HERZOG LOVED VANCOUVER & THAT SHOWS IN HIS ARCHIVE OF COLOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

FRED HERZOG, one of the best when it came to photographing a Canadian city, died on Monday, September 9/2019 at the age of 88. He found subject matter in the streets of Vancouver, focusing on architecture, people, cafes, billboards, darkened streets, neon, and life in some of the roughest parts of town.<‘Modern Colour’ Vancouver – by Fred Herzog>  Born in Stuttgart, he moved to Vancouver in 1952. During the day he’d work as a medical photographer and at the University of British Columbia.<Equinox Gallery Vancouver – Granville Street at Night by Fred Herzog>  His off-times it were mostly about taking pictures. He’d work primarily with Kodachrome slide film to create a wonderful vision of Vancouver, as it was in the 1950’s when neon was king.Herzog photographs are in the National Gallery of Canada, the Vancouver Art Gallery, numerous private collections and books. He’s survived by his daughter Ariane and son Tyson. His wife Christel died in 2013.  <ABOVE – Alexander Street by Fred Herzog – Equinox Gallery Vancouver – >

WHAT KIND OF PUBLIC ART WOULD FIT A 76-STOREY SKYSCRAPER? – “SAFE HANDS” BY RON ARAD

Even people who live at One Bloor Street East may not know who created their condo’s sculpture. <ABOVE – Night time design proposal, Ron Arad Studio>The installed sculpture is 88 feet tall, and consists of two 31-metre stacks of intertwined metal tubing, looking as if it’s climbing the building, and occupying a smallish space where Bloor meets Yonge.The artist, RON ARAD, industrial and architectural designer, was born in Tel Aviv in 1951. He’s a busy man, and his work occupies public spaces in London, Tokyo, Seoul, Milan, Tel Aviv, Singapore – and now TORONTO. On a much smaller scale, Mr. Arad has also designed perfume bottles, bookshelves, memorials, and eyewear.The title ‘Safe Hands’ refers to the safety you’ll feel once you’re inside this building at the corner of Yonge and Bloor Street East.

THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM LIVENS UP BLOOR ST. W. @ UNIVERSITY AVE. WITH A NEW PLAZA

Why a new plaza? The ROM’s goal is to make its Bloor Street entrance a gathering spot – a place for music, dance, plantings, bubble blowing, and enjoying the passing parade at one of the busiest intersections downtown.
“We don’t necessarily have a lot of space between our building and the street,” said ROM Director and CEO Josh Basseches, “but let’s turn that space into something that really serves the city and beyond.”
A big plus for the Plaza – Philosopher’s Walk – a lengthy, green connection from Bloor Street West to the University of TORONTO. In the heart of the city, this is a walk in the country. The performance terrace was made possible by Helga and Mike Schmidt, and the Reed family gave their support to the Plaza. Designer – Siamak Hariri. <PHOTO ABOVE – Craig White>

STORM TROOPERS ARRIVE EN MASSE AT TORONTO’S FAN EXPO – PHOTOS BY STEVEN EVANS

‘Fan Expo Canada’ is celebrating 25 years bringing fans in all shapes and sizes together again. This has become a huge event at the Metro TORONTO Convention Centre, and offers up countless photographic opportunities. STEVEN EVANS was there with his camera and sent along these black-and-white images of the Storm Troopers.For more of Steven’s work go to – http://www.stevenevansphotography.com

SELF-GUIDED TOURING – SCARBOROUGH ON BIKES, IN CARS & HIKING BOOTS OR JUST PLAIN WALKING

I hadn’t encountered one of these books before. It happened to be sitting all alone on a shelf in TORONTO City Hall. Published by the city, it’s free, well researched, gives travel directions, photos, maps, touring loops, advice on eateries, history, architecture – everything you’d need to know.THE SCARBOROUGH SIGN (page 86), built in 2018, is moved to sites and events in different parts of the borough to promote community pride. Scarborough’s population is 626,000; first settled in the 1790’s; has a very diverse culture; is popular with new immigrants; went from a township to suburb, to borough, to a city, and now it’s a ‘division’, amalgamated with TORONTO.Top attractions – TORONTO Zoo (largest in Canada), The Scarborough Bluffs (cliffs and beaches along Lake Ontario); strip malls with some of the best take-out multi-cultural food anywhere in the GTA; and eat-in restaurants (some of which were recommended by the New York Times’ Frugal Traveler).Map from Wikipedia – Scarborough is in red on the east side of TORONTO. Find out more about the Cultural Hot Spot service, this book and others by going to this address —— http://www.toronto.ca/culturalhotspot  ——  BELOW are some excerpts from ‘Explore Scarborough’.ROUGE VALLEY NATIONAL URBAN PARK (page 28), 1749 Meadowvale Road, is the largest urban park in North America, stretching from TORONTO into Markham and Whitchurch-Stouffville. The Conservation Centre is housed in an 1893 house owned by the Pearse family, who operated a saw mill on the Rouge River. The park is massive.FINCH HYDRO CORRIDOR EAST TRAIL, photo by Corey Horowitz, (page 11), a recreational & biking trail underneath Ontario Hydro’s transmission lines. Plans are to lengthen it. SEWELLS BRIDGE, Sewells Road, north of Old Finch Avenue, is one of the oldest bridges in Scarborough and the only remaining suspension bridge in Ontario. – (page 26)
One of many MURALS across the district. This one commemorates the women who worked in the General Engineering Co. plant during World War II. It’s in the underpass at Warden and St. Clair.THE SCARBOROUGH SRT (rapid transit line connects with subway line #2, page 39). Completed in 1985 the SRT was once thought to be technological and transit for the future – with its magnetic propulsion system promoted by the provincial government. It hasn’t worked out that way.  Delays and breakdowns, especially in winter, are common. But the idea was passed on to Detroit and Vancouver with much greater success.SCARBOROUGH COLLEGE (pages 70, 71), within the University of TORONTO, founded in 1964. It was designed by Australian, JOHN ANDREWS, who is known in Canada for also designing the CN Tower – our #One attraction. The campus is known for its Brutalist and Modernist buildings as well as some contemporary ones.  It starred recently in Oscar-winning feature ‘The Shape of Water’.DORIS McCARTHY GALLERY (pages 73, 107 & 108), 125 Military Trail, is named after Calgarian Doris Jean McCarthy, born in 1910. She spent more than 70 years living in her house on top of the Scarborough Bluffs, affectionately known as “Fool’s Paradise”. That name came from her mother who thought the purchase was excessive for a young school art teacher. She was known for her Canadian landscapes, and became a very successful painter.ST. AUGUSTINE’S SEMINARY, (page 99) 2661 Kingston Road. It’s on private property, and can only be observed from the street. Built in 1910, and dedicated in 1913, it’s the first seminary in English-speaking Canada, and the first institution of higher learning in Scarborough.

SCARBOROUGH MUSEUM (page57), 1007 Brimley Road, 1858, was originally a clapboard farmhouse, restored and furnished to its 1914 state. The Cornell family, who once lived there, built the townships’ first sawmill and influenced the building of a road along Lake Ontario, which later became Kingston Road.

MICHAEL MITCHELL – PHOTOGRAPHER, WRITER, COLLECTOR, OUTDOORSMAN, TRAVELER & FRIEND

“Photographers tend to be collectors. Most people travel through life experiencing the world in successive moments. Photographers, however, stop to concentrate, preserve and collect certain of those moments.” –  Michael Mitchell, 2005. <PHOTO ABOVE – Michael Mitchell in 2019 by Ken Straiton>
And collect them he does . . . Michael’s new book, ‘FINAL FIRE’, a memoir, recently came out, published by ECW Press in TORONTO. Fellow artist and filmmaker MICHAEL SNOW writes “the book breathes. Eloquent descriptions of contact with nature alternate with the narration of extremely varied episodes (in the author’s life) – from the hilarious to the profoundly sad.”Canadian photographer EDWARD BURTYNSKY: “Mitchell’s many friendships and adventures with exquisite observations (are) woven into every page, and offer glistening reflections of a passionate and creative life fully lived. Here is a must-read for anyone wondering what artists do with their lives – in this case a Canadian life.”‘A Telling Portrait – The Work and Collection of Michael Mitchell’ was shown at the Ryerson Image Centre, 30 Gould Street, in April & May 2015. <ABOVE – the catalogue self-portrait of Michael for the show, polaroid, 1983> Highlighting his professional background in anthropology, the exhibition celebrated Michael’s approach to the medium of photography, and his long-term commitment to TORONTO’s photographic community.  My partner and I have both read ‘Final Fire’ and highly recommend it. ECW indie publishers are located at 665 Gerrard Street East.  The company has published over 1,000 books so far; phone – 416-694-3348 . . . . . . https://ecwpress.com/collections/vendors?q=Mitchell%2C%20Michael