ARCHITECT I.M. PEI, RENOWNED FOR HIS PRECISION GEOMETRY, HAS DIED AT THE AGE OF 102

<PHOTO – Architectural Daily>

Born in Guangzhou in 1917, PEI moved to the US at the age of 18 to study at MIT and Harvard. One of the 20th Century’s most prolific architects, he has designed municipal buildings, hotels, schools and other structures across North America, Asia and Europe.

In TORONTO PEI is known for Commerce Court, where Bay Street meets King West in the Financial District.  His style was described as modernist with cubist themes, and was influenced by his love of Islamic architecture. His favoured building materials were glass and steel, with a combination of concrete. (BBC)

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TORONTO PHOTOGRAPHER ELIOT WRIGHT INVESTIGATES THE CITY’S TRANSITIONING DUPONT STREET

A seemingly unremarkable thoroughfare, DUPONT STREET is located alongside the Canadian Pacific Railway line that long ago marked TORONTO’s city limits.Leaving behind its industrial past in the face of rapid redevelopment, the old street epitomizes the fact that modern, urban landscapes are always in flux.“Further Along The Road”, a large exhibition of ELIOT WRIGHT’s photography is on display at the URBANSPACE Gallery, 401 Richmond St. West, until July 31/2019. Artist talk – June 6th, 7:30 to 9:00 pm.

Website – http://www.urbanspacegallery.ca

THE 23RD ANNUAL ‘SCOTIABANK PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL’ IS IN THE SPOTLIGHT CITY-WIDE

CONTACT/2019 is showing a wide range of Canadian and international photo-based art across town. By collaborating with the city’s museums, galleries and artist-run centres, the event has grown into one of the largest anywhere – and much of it is free.<VIVEK SHRAYA, Calgary-based,“Trauma Clown,” 2019, May 4 – June 2, PATEL PROJECTS, 184 Munro Street, Unit #6 – rear>

CONTACT is based on an open call to participate. Emerging artists are given the opportunity to show their work along with leading professionals. Local galleries, community centres, educational institutions, cafes, stores and other alternative locations are all involved – over 200 of them this year.

Take in some of the 175 gallery openings and learn about photography at lectures, panel discussions and workshops – it’s all available during TORONTO’s month of photography.

<SPUTNIK PHOTO COLLECTIVE, “Anaklia, Georgia, an Unfinished Viewing Tower,” 2013, contemporary life in the former USSR, until May 31, ALLEN LAMBERT GALLERIA, 181 Bay Street>

<AYSIR BATNIJI, from the series Untitled (Gaza Walls), 2001, May 3 – June 22, PREFIX INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART, 401 Richmond St. West, suite 124>

<GISELE FREUND, “Colette”, 1938, gift of Valerie Burton & David Milman, 1985, ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO>

‘THE MOON: A VOYAGE THRU TIME’ MIXES MODERN ART WITH MASTERWORKS @ THE AGA KHAN MUSEUM

Who isn’t transfixed some nights when they look up to see a full silver or orangey moon. It’s magic, and you can see it without causing eye damage.

For this exhibition the AGA KHAN MUSEUM, 77 Wynford Drive in DON MILLS has assembled works from prestigious institutions in London, New York, Cleveland, Cambridge, Oxford, Ann Arbor, Rotterdam, Toronto – and from the Aga Khan collection itself.

A highlight is ‘MOON’, a giant sculpture created by contemporary British artist LUKE JERRAM. It features detailed NASA imagery of the lunar surface, and includes sound by BAFTA-winning composer DAN JONES.

The sculpture measures five metres in diameter and it would take 40 people standing shoulder-to-shoulder to circle it.

The AGA KHAN MUSEUM is a work of art itself. Tours can be arranged, and the museum’s DIWAN restaurant has developed an excellent reputation. ‘The Moon’ continues until August 18/2019.

Website – http://www.agakhanmuseum.org

THE LAKESHORE WAS ONCE MOTEL & DINER CENTRAL – NOW CONDOMINIUMS HAVE TAKEN OVER

‘LAKESHORE’ by CHRIS RIDDELL

Along this strip
you could once find
vintage Thunderbirds
pulling into burger joints
before the movies,
and afterward they’d go
ripping up and down
the pavement,
surfing on the lake breeze.

That was when
the edge of town boomed
and everyone went to Lakeshore
to eat in diners
caressed by the cool wind,
and spend nights by the water
in small motels
on the beaches of Lake Ontario

Now their bodies crumble
as an excavator eats them
like crackers
and it’s stunning how easily
something comes to ruin,
how swift
the passage of time.

CHRIS RIDDELL is a writer and musician based in TORONTO. He’s written for Maisonneuve & The Globe and Mail, and his poetry has appeared in Vallum, Sulphur, and amomancies.

He endeavors to capture the beauty of the world, and universal truths about life on Earth.
You can reach Chris on Twitter (@itschrisriddell) and on Instagram (@modernquixote).

VALLUM, specializes in contemporary poetry, interviews and essays. It’s available, both in print and on the web at http://www.vallummag.com/archives_14_1.html

NOTRE-DAME DE PARIS HAS ALWAYS BEEN THERE, AND WE THOUGHT IT ALWAYS WOULD BE

The medieval Catholic cathedral on the Île de la Cité was built between 1160 and 1260, making it one of the world’s oldest and finest examples of French Gothic architecture. <PHOTO – Eduard Baldus, 1860’s>

It’s so much a part of France that embedded in the square outside is Paris Point Zero, marking the centre of the city and the country itself.

Now that the roof and other parts have been destroyed by fire, the world is mourning the loss of the treasures sheltered there – the enormous stained glass windows, sculptural decorations, the organ and altar (saved), the roof, the spire (destroyed), the paintings and religious collections.

<Front page ’24 Minutes’, PARIS, April 16/2019>

The destruction of Our Lady of Paris comes at a time when the city itself has seen some of the world’s most vicious acts of terrorist violence. France is badly divided in 2019, but in the face of all this, PARIS will survive – as it has through the French Revolution and two world wars.

<Front page, Le Journal de Montréal, Quebec, April 16/2019>

President Emmanuel Macron has announced that Notre-Dame will be rebuilt, stating “it’s part of the fate, the destiny of FRANCE, and our common project over the coming years. I am committed to it.”

<Front page, Toronto Star, April 16/2019>

<Editorial cartoon by GRAEME MACKAY, Hamilton Spectator, April 16/2019>

‘STACKT’, CANADA’S LARGEST SHIPPING CONTAINER MARKET & CULTURAL SPACE IS NOW OPEN

<The site under construction. Photo courtesy ASTOUND>

LGA Architectural Partners have designed a two-block, 2.4-acre site on city-owned land at Bathurst and Front Streets. TORONTO is planning to eventually turn the space into a public park, but for now it’s pop-up shops, food and beverage vendors & an onsite brewery, mixed in with courtyards, pedestrian paths, and open spaces for community programming and events.

STACKT’s physical structure can be picked up and moved elsewhere – in a different configuration – at a future date. That’s the genius behind the project, leaving the site unscathed.

<A one-container retail unit. Photo courtesy ASTOUND design-build>

JANNA LEVITT, Partner at LGA Architectural Partners – “Retailers are looking for unique physical spaces and experiential opportunities for their customers. Shipping containers suggest an unusual and immersive retail experience while also offering a practical and sustainable building solution.” – CANADIAN ARCHITECT

<Belgian Moon brewery anchors the site. Photo courtesy Pomp & Circumstance>