I’VE PASSED THIS GALLERY FOR YEARS & NEVER WENT IN. ‘PARLIAMENT STREET NEWS’ WOKE ME UP.

Not-for-profit Gallery Arcturus, a hidden public art museum on Gerrard St. East near Church St. It’s a surprise once you climb the stairs and go in for a look. Those who’ve never been inside feel immediate surprise – especially the locals. On the walls and about four floors there’s painting, collage, drawing, sculpture – and a great variety of other media. The gallery is a member of the Ontario Association of Art Galleries and the Ontario Museum Association. It pays to read community newspapers such as PSN, Parliament Street News, & it’s well worth keeping your eyes open.  <Photo-Wikipedia>

HERE’S A SMART IDEA FOR A PHOTOGRAPHER WHO WANTS TO EXHIBIT SOME OF HIS/HER WORK.

I was walking along Parliament Street some time ago and there was ‘The Street Gallery’ with one beautifully framed photograph. A couple was preparing to board the subway, and this professional image was backed by a rather noisy, sheltering construction wall. The photo remained for a couple of weeks, and I kept going back.  Then it was gone.

MERIDIAN HALL FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, FRONT ST. EAST, WITH CANADA’S LARGEST SOFT-SEAT AUDITORIUM

The use of Carrarra marble throughout the main lobby transmits a sense of grand opulence to the Centre, along with artist York Wilson’s famous mural, ‘The Seven Lively Arts’. A personal comment on that mural – as a student at Toronto’s Ryerson University, there was an exam on theatrical history, focused on the. mural. A copy was distributed, and we had to write several paragraphs about what we saw in the mural, end-to-end, for two hours. I haven’t forgotten that challenge. It was always on my mind whenever we took in a show. There have been several names attached to the building – The O’Keefe Centre, The Hummingbird Centre, The Sony Centre, and now it’s The Meridian Hall.

FRED HERZOG LOVED VANCOUVER & IT SHOWS IN HIS ARCHIVE OF COLOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

<‘Modern Colour’ Vancouver – by Fred Herzog, courtesy – Estate of Fred Herzog & Equinox Gallery.> German-born, Vancouver-based (1930–2019) he was a pioneer of colour street photography in the 1950s, when only black and white was considered fine art of the medium. In 1953, he was regularly covering city streets, camera in hand. snapping photos of the docks, the airport, the street, the people. Adds Herzog – “I loved the city for its grittiness”—a quality he captured in vivid colour using Kodachrome slide film.

SONG DONG’S ‘WISDOM OF THE POOR: COMMUNAL COURTYARD’ GIVEN TO THE ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO

This will take up serious storage space. It’s an “immersive” labyrinth of 100 Chinese doors assembled by Beijing avant-garde artist Song Dong (b.1966) – originally for the Venice Biennale – and now in the permanent collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario. The armoire doors were rescued from within the Beijing hutongs, a vast network of laneway housing either being demolished or gentrified, in a capital city that’s been expanding and rebuilding at breakneck speed. ‘The Wisdom of the Poor’ addresses the role of traditional architecture in today’s changing urban environment. <PHOTO – Song Dong, Pace Gallery>. <Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas Street West>