A VICTORIAN GHOST REAPPEARS AS RYERSON U. UNVEILS PLANS FOR AN URBAN INNOVATION CENTRE

Hidden behind a 1960‘s-era facade, a 40,000-square-foot piece of Victoriana, chimneys and all, will soon be part of Ryerson University’s $46-million Centre for Urban Innovation. The 1886 heritage building once housed Canada’s first pharmacy school, and until recently was the university’s Theatre Arts School.

The Centre for Urban Innovation will bring together researchers of separate but related subjects with a focus on nutrition, energy and water in an urban context. Carol Phillips of Moriyama and Teshima Architects is the lead designer of the project.

The Ontario College of Pharmacy Gerrard Street East entrance, built in 1887, was demolished and replaced by a modern facade in 1963. <PHOTO – City of Toronto Archives>

TORONTO SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTS CELEBRATES CANADA’S 150TH BIRTHDAY WITH A SPEAKER SERIES

The TORONTO Society of Architects’ lecture for this year’s ‘Doors Open’ will take place in the former Unilever Factory, 21 Don Roadway, East Harbour. ‘What is Canadian Architecture?’ is the focus, and the program will feature a debate among leading designers and architects from Canada and beyond.

Closed-toed shoes are strongly recommended because this is a former factory building. Both covered bike racks and free parking will be available. Friday, May 26 at 7pm.

http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=89f1e4c8bb34b510VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD

THE ELEGANT HARBOUR COMMMISSION BUILDING WAS ONCE PERCHED ON THE EDGE OF A PIER

Erected in 1917 between two waterfront warehouses, the Harbour Commission Building has survived radical changes on the shores of Lake Ontario. Infill has left the 6-storey structure on dry land, surrounded fore and aft by numerous skyscrapers, the Harbourfront Centre, three theatres, Queens Quay, the Power Plant contemporary art gallery, shops, a streetcar line and a cycling/walking trail.

<PHOTO ABOVE – Harbour Commission Building, lower right, on its pier; City of Toronto Archives>

QRC WEST IS ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFULLY INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENTS IN DOWNTOWN TORONTO

allied1allied2It’s not every day that a TORONTO developer saves two heritage structures, installs a super atrium connector and puts up a multi-storey office building with an eOne sign on top. Such is the case with QRC WEST, at the corner of Peter Street and Richmond West. It’s photogenic in the extreme.

allied4allied3allied6         The two heritage buildings were once Weston bread & baked goods factories. Now they’ve been modernized, connected and house some of TORONTO’s most coveted office space.

allied8<PHOTOS – Peter Street as it was in the 1940’s, 50’s>

allied9<Richmond Street West as it once was>

allied10<PHOTO ABOVE – connecting the two elderly red-brick structures; HGC Engineering>

Owned and developed by Allied Properties, QRC West was designed by Sweeny, Sterling, Finlayson & Co. Architects.

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