RIVERSIDE’S LANDMARK HOTEL GETS A TOTAL MAKEOVER AND IS ABOUT TO RE-OPEN ITS DOORS

<Two years ago the Broadview was covered in tarp as restoration work began>

Another of TORONTO’s 19th century hotels has been given a new lease on life – this time by Streetcar Developments. The company, headquartered in Riverside (Queen Street East at the Don River), purchased the 126-year-old building and has been working on it for the last couple of years.

First named Dingman’s Hall after an Alberta oilman, it became the Broadview in 1907. Then it was renamed the Lincoln Hotel, then back to the Broadview. By the 1970’s it was boarding house with JILLY’S, a strip club on the ground floor.

“We’ve restored it to its original purpose – a neighbourhood gathering place and hotel – while keeping in mind its various incarnations through its 125-year history,” says Jeff Schnitter, Streetcar’s VP of architecture.  <PHOTO ABOVE – the old Broadview sign will be part of the new decor>

The street-level café and bar will serve breakfast, take-out and coffee during the day and become a cocktail and champagne bar at night. <IMAGE – Norm Li>

The Rooftop Restaurant features a skylight and floor-to-ceiling windows. It’s housed in a glass box. <IMAGE – Norm Li>

The tower will be open for private events, with room for 20 diners or 30 for receptions. On the seventh floor, this part of the old hotel features exposed brick and wood, arched windows and a vaulted ceiling. <Interior Design credit: DesignAgency / Rendering credit: Norm Li>

On the opposite side of Queen Street East, Streetcar Developments is working on another new development – Riverside Square<IMAGE BELOW>

A VICTORIAN GHOST REAPPEARS AS RYERSON U. UNVEILS PLANS FOR AN URBAN INNOVATION CENTRE

Hidden behind a 1960‘s-era facade, a 40,000-square-foot piece of Victoriana, chimneys and all, will soon be part of Ryerson University’s $46-million Centre for Urban Innovation. The 1886 heritage building once housed Canada’s first pharmacy school, and until recently was the university’s Theatre Arts School.

The Centre for Urban Innovation will bring together researchers of separate but related subjects with a focus on nutrition, energy and water in an urban context. Carol Phillips of Moriyama and Teshima Architects is the lead designer of the project.

The Ontario College of Pharmacy Gerrard Street East entrance, built in 1887, was demolished and replaced by a modern facade in 1963. <PHOTO – City of Toronto Archives>

THE ELEGANT HARBOUR COMMMISSION BUILDING WAS ONCE PERCHED ON THE EDGE OF A PIER

Erected in 1917 between two waterfront warehouses, the Harbour Commission Building has survived radical changes on the shores of Lake Ontario. Infill has left the 6-storey structure on dry land, surrounded fore and aft by numerous skyscrapers, the Harbourfront Centre, three theatres, Queens Quay, the Power Plant contemporary art gallery, shops, a streetcar line and a cycling/walking trail.

<PHOTO ABOVE – Harbour Commission Building, lower right, on its pier; City of Toronto Archives>

QRC WEST IS ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFULLY INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENTS IN DOWNTOWN TORONTO

allied1allied2It’s not every day that a TORONTO developer saves two heritage structures, installs a super atrium connector and puts up a multi-storey office building with an eOne sign on top. Such is the case with QRC WEST, at the corner of Peter Street and Richmond West. It’s photogenic in the extreme.

allied4allied3allied6         The two heritage buildings were once Weston bread & baked goods factories. Now they’ve been modernized, connected and house some of TORONTO’s most coveted office space.

allied8<PHOTOS – Peter Street as it was in the 1940’s, 50’s>

allied9<Richmond Street West as it once was>

allied10<PHOTO ABOVE – connecting the two elderly red-brick structures; HGC Engineering>

Owned and developed by Allied Properties, QRC West was designed by Sweeny, Sterling, Finlayson & Co. Architects.

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