CANADIAN IMPRESSIONIST ART DOES INDEED EXIST AND SOME OF IT’S ON TOUR IN EUROPE

Kunsthalle München, Kanada, Kanada und der Expressionismus, Vernissage, 18.7.2019.  The National Gallery of Canada is opening some eyes in MUNICH, as ‘Canada and Impressionism: New Horizons, 1880-1930’ has been installed at the Kunsthalle Munchen. Curiosity has led to lineups. < ABOVE – Lineup on  opening night, Kunsthalle Munich, photo – ‘Canadian Art’ magazine>

<Laura Muntz, ‘The Pink Dress’, 1897, oil on canvas, private collection, TorontoThe National Gallery’s Senior Curator, KATERINA ATANASSOVA, said: “To me, this period is the most important period in the history of Canadian art.”<ABOVE – Clarence Gagnon, ‘Old Houses’, Baie-Saint-Paul, 1912, oil on canvas, private collection, Toronto>  Ms. Atanassaova said the Canadian style of Impressionism is different because of our northern climate. The light of Canada differs from the light one would find in a warm Mediterranean climate. Also, Canadian artists often had to work very quickly, because their fingers were in danger of freezing if they didn’t.<ABOVE – Helen McNicoll, ‘Sunny September’, 1913, oil on canvas, private collection, Toronto>  For the record – more than a thousand attended on opening night. ‘Canadian Impressionism’ will be on display in Munich until November 19th. Then it moves on to Lausanne, Switzerland, and from there to Montpellier, France. In the fall of 2020 the tour will come to an end at home base in Ottawa – then we’ll get to see it.

Advertisements

THE WORKHORSES OF QUEEN ST. ARE DOWN TO THE LAST TWO & THEY’LL RETIRE ON LABOUR DAY

TORONTO’s articulated light rail (ALRV) streetcars have laboured long and hard since the late 1980’s. They weren’t expected to live so long, but they have, thanks to a huge investment by the TORONTO Transit Commission. Once there were 52 of them, and now only a couple remain in service. And those two take their last rides on Monday, September 2nd. One will head west from the Russell Carhouse near Queen E. & Greenwood Ave.; the other will depart from Bathurst and Wolesley Streets. The very last departure will be from the Wolesley Loop to the Russell Carhouse. Rides are free from 2:00 to 5:00 pm.

THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM LIVENS UP BLOOR ST. W. @ UNIVERSITY AVE. WITH A NEW PLAZA

Why a new plaza? The ROM’s goal is to make its Bloor Street entrance a gathering spot – a place for music, dance, plantings, bubble blowing, and enjoying the passing parade at one of the busiest intersections downtown.
“We don’t necessarily have a lot of space between our building and the street,” said ROM Director and CEO Josh Basseches, “but let’s turn that space into something that really serves the city and beyond.”
A big plus for the Plaza – Philosopher’s Walk – a lengthy, green connection from Bloor Street West to the University of TORONTO. In the heart of the city, this is a walk in the country. The performance terrace was made possible by Helga and Mike Schmidt, and the Reed family gave their support to the Plaza. Designer – Siamak Hariri. <PHOTO ABOVE – Craig White>

SOME CITIES GROW WAY TOO FAST & JAKARTA IS ONE OF THEM – SADLY, IT’S ALSO SINKING

CBC television reported this week that JAKARTA, capital city of Indonesia, is one of the world’s fastest sinking big cities. Because of that, a new capital on the island of Borneo is in the planning stages. Over 30-million live in Jakarta, which makes it even larger than Mexico City, and just below the population of Tokyo.The BBC has created a hair-raising video of this massive metropolis with some of the worst air quality almost anywhere. The address – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOSwBIstZUs

‘PLUM BLOSSOM FROM THE BITTER COLD’ – A HISTORY OF CHINESE CANADIANS IN THE GTA

<ABOVE – Nassau Street & Spadina Avenue, acrylic on linen, by Rajeev Singhal, 2011, Baldwin Collection>The Toronto Public Library collects family, business documents and ephemera about Chinese-Canadians and their lives in the Greater TORONTO Area (the GTA). The selection of photos below come from various donors, and give us a small glimpse of a diverse community, which now numbers about 550,000. The Library’s exhibit from the award-winning Chinese archive continues until October 27/2019 in the TD Gallery, Main Floor, 789 Yonge Street – http://www.tpl.ca/tdgallery<PHOTO – Minister DAVID LEE visits the CHONG Family, date unknown>
<ARLENE CHAN performs a ribbon dance at the Opera Ball, 1965; photo – Ray McFadden><The dynamic JEAN LUMB (I remember meeting her). She was successful in protecting TORONTO’s Spadina-area Chinatown from demolition by developers, 1967. Photo – Doug Griffin><Robert Wong <above> and his brother Tommy started the Central Airways Company. Through the decades, they trained over 8,000 pilots while they watched TORONTO’s changing skyline.  Above – Robert strikes a pose at Toronto Island Airport, 1946><Yoot Loy Laundry on King Street East, 1887, Baldwin Collection><Ing Lee Laundry on Main Street, ca1900, Baldwin Collection><Elizabeth Street, watercolour on paper, 1931, by W. F. G. Godfrey, 1884-1971, Baldwin Collection>

STORM TROOPERS ARRIVE EN MASSE AT TORONTO’S FAN EXPO – PHOTOS BY STEVEN EVANS

‘Fan Expo Canada’ is celebrating 25 years bringing fans in all shapes and sizes together again. This has become a huge event at the Metro TORONTO Convention Centre, and offers up countless photographic opportunities. STEVEN EVANS was there with his camera and sent along these black-and-white images of the Storm Troopers.For more of Steven’s work go to – http://www.stevenevansphotography.com

“IF YOU LIKE NEW YORK, TRY TORONTO” – A WRITEUP IN SUNDAY’S NEW YORK TIMES

In the Travel Section of the New York Times, August 25/2019 – “Like the largest city in the United States, TORONTO, Canada’s largest, offers a wealth of cultural and culinary attractions. Just over half of the city’s population, 51%, is foreign-born (with) 231 nationalities, a source of great culinary diversity.”“The prices pale in comparison to the New Yorks, San Franciscos and Chicagos of the world, but the value is there,” said Franco Stalteri, who, since 2009, has hosted pop-up dinners with globally renowned chefs. “We benefit from a vast multiculturalism I’ve never seen anywhere else.”Also mentioned – the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Power Plant, Airbnb, October’s international art fair, and other attractions.Columnist ELAINE GLUSAC writes “American travelers can stretch their budgets wherever the US dollar is strong. One place is, conveniently, our northern neighbour.” That’s us!