TORONTO’S OFFICIAL FLAG WAS DESIGNED IN 1974 BY 21-YEAR-OLD STUDENT, RENATO DE SANTIS

Renato De Santis, a graphic design student at George Brown College , won a 1974 competition among 670 entries, held by the City of Toronto Flag Design Committee.  A variation of this flag is used by Toronto Fire Services’ fireboat ‘William Lyon Mackenzie’. Mackenzie was a Scottish-born Canadian-American journalist and politician, who founded newspapers critical of elite members of Upper Canada, known as The Family Compact. He aligned with Reformers and represented York County in the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada.

The flag <BELOW> displays the twin towers of City Hall on a blue background, with Canada’s red maple leaf from the national flag at its base.

HERE’S A SMART IDEA FOR A PHOTOGRAPHER WHO WANTS TO EXHIBIT SOME OF HIS/HER WORK.

I was walking along Parliament Street some time ago and there was ‘The Street Gallery’ with one beautifully framed photograph. A couple was preparing to board the subway, and this professional image was backed by a rather noisy, sheltering construction wall. The photo remained for a couple of weeks, and I kept going back.  Then it was gone.

THERE’S NO STOPPING CANADA’S RETIRED ASTRONAUT, CHRIS HADFIELD – HE’S NOW A WRITER.

By writer I mean ‘novelist’ and ‘thriller’, his latest is titled ‘The Apollo Murders’, which takes place in 1973 when there was a battle between the Americans and the Soviets for predominance in Space. “It all really happened”, declared Chris. “Almost 95 per cent of the book is real, and I’ve got the experience to bring in the reality of it.” He is heavily involved in teaching at universities; working with a COVID detection technology company; researching and writing his next book; and hoping for the success of this one, “along with choices of fun, challenging, and with hopefully worthwhile things to do.”  <From an interview with Dawn Calleja, The Globe and Mail, October 23/2021>

AFTER 3 YEARS OF RENOVATION AND REVITALIZATION MASSEY HALL GETS READY TO REOPEN

Plans are to open its doors again in November, 2021. In July, 2021 the venerable concert hall already celebrated its 127th birthday. Originally constructed to seat 3,500 patrons, and built then for about $150,000 in 1894, it’s now finishing up a multi-million dollar renovation. The brand new attached Allied Music Centre will feature state-of-the-art performance venues and spaces for artist development, education and outreach initiatives. These will make use of the 7-storey tower (attached behind) Toronto’s oldest concert hall and National Historic Site. Financed by the federal and provincial governments as well as the city, this project will no doubt be over the top. Renovating the old building and constructing the new one, along with modern loading docks, new artist dressing rooms and improved technical facilities for large touring productions, it will be one busy place at 92 Shuter Street.

‘THE ONE’ IS ITS NAME, AND IT COULD BE THE TALLEST HABITABLE BUILDING IN TORONTO & CANADA

There’s a competition for being the “tallest” in Toronto and Canada since other ‘giants’ are now going up daily.  Should the City approve and the increase permitted ‘The One’ would retain the record of the tallest in the country, with a fine development site and glorious views. The structure still has a way to go, but it’s already attracting multitudes of Torontonians, and record amounts of media.  <Above – ‘The One’ is on the Bloor Street West level.> <Photo above – Constructing ‘The One’, which is in the foreground.> <For More information  – MIZRAHI Developments – “AN ICON IS RISING”.indeed>

MERIDIAN HALL FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, FRONT ST. EAST, WITH CANADA’S LARGEST SOFT-SEAT AUDITORIUM

The use of Carrarra marble throughout the main lobby transmits a sense of grand opulence to the Centre, along with artist York Wilson’s famous mural, ‘The Seven Lively Arts’. A personal comment on that mural – as a student at Toronto’s Ryerson University, there was an exam on theatrical history, focused on the. mural. A copy was distributed, and we had to write several paragraphs about what we saw in the mural, end-to-end, for two hours. I haven’t forgotten that challenge. It was always on my mind whenever we took in a show. There have been several names attached to the building – The O’Keefe Centre, The Hummingbird Centre, The Sony Centre, and now it’s The Meridian Hall.

ON THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SHERBOURNE & ADELAIDE STREETS SITS A FINE GEORGIAN HOUSE

Built in 1842 by first-class blacksmith, Paul Bishop, the House is really a pair of historic townhouses located at 363-365 Adelaide Street East downtown. Those houses, constructed in 1848, also by Paul Bishop, sit upon foundations laid by William Jarvis for his home in 1798. William Jarvis was a member of the Queen’s Rifles, as well as Provincial Secretary and Registrar of Upper Canada. After William Jarvis’s death in 1817, his son Samuel divided the two acres of land where the townhouses sat on smaller parcels, and sold them. Bishop’s House went through a number of owners and was expanded in the early 1820s. <You’ll find many more details on Paul Bishop’s historic House in Wikipedia.>

MARCUS GEE, GLOBE AND MAIL COLUMNIST, STANDS UP FOR THE TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSION

Marcus writes – “The TTC, now celebrating it’s 100th anniversary, is the third busiest system in North America after New York’s and Mexico City’s. It’s a comprehensive, city-wide grid. You only have to travel to just about any American city to see how good we have it. . . . . Both federal and provincial governments are investing billions. The result is a series of huge projects, from the Finch West LRT and the Eglinton Crosstown to the Scarborough subway extension. And there’s the upcoming Ontario Line, a whole new subway route for Central Toronto. The TTC is buying 60 more of those sleek new streetcars, replacing old diesel buses with cleaner diesel-electric hybrids and trying out a battery-powered model. Subway service is speeding up by getting new trains . . . . It’s spending many millions making stations more accessible.” There’s much to consider, thanks to Marcus Gee.