THOSE WERE THE DAYS WHEN TORONTO GOT ITS FULL SHARE OF SNOW

Not sure what’s happening here, but there’s a team of horses involved, a dog, a wood pile, and what looks like a stove. Could this be maple syrup gathering? Anyway there was a time when our city knew what a real winter could be. PHOTO – City of Toronto Archive.<CAN’T WAIT!>

THERE’S COLOUR & MOVEMENT THIS WEEKEND AS YORKVILLE CELEBRATES MURALISM & PUBLIC ART

TORONTO’s Yorkville Murals is an annual three-day cultural event celebrating contemporary muralism and public art. A collection of artistic murals couldn’t be missed inside the courtyard at 99 Yorkville Avenue.There are panels, exhibits, and screenings transforming into an outdoor gallery all summer long.  Half of the artists are Canadian. This year’s event featured Djs, light shows, and live painting by two Montreal-based artists Mateo and Xray. Mixing big names like Los Angeles-based street artist, Mr. Brainwash, with local or up-and-coming talent is the cornerstone of the project. – CBC News.<ABOVE by JARUS/Yorkville Murals><ABOVE by Montreal-based OLA VOLO>

DESPITE COVID-19, CANADA’S PROPERTY MARKET NUMBERS ARE REACHING NEW HEIGHTS

From May onward property markets have been reeling in record prices and record sales. According to the Canadian Real Estate Association, the national home price index calculated a typical home sale at 3.3% to $637,600 from January to July. In Montreal the index rose 7.7% to $401,200 . . . . Ottawa jumped 9.4% to $502,500 . . . . in the Toronto Region it increased 4% to $876,100 . . . .  and in the Vancouver area $1,023,100.For renters with secure jobs, the situation is not dire. In tight markets such as TORONTO, supply is up and demand is down. A large number of new apartments and condos will soon be on the market, both in, and outside the city. – Report On Business, Globe and Mail, August 22/2020

ST. BASIL’S CHURCH, THE COLLEGIATE CHURCH OF SAINT MICHAEL’S COLLEGE, 1856

Best known to Torontonians as the church with the noontime bells, ST. BASIL’s was built in a neighbourhood once called CLOVERHILL.  The architect was a Scotsman – WILLIAM HAY.  In 1856 – this area was all open countryside, but today it’s filled with high-rise condos.As more buildings go up, the neighbourhood had been fighting to save a small park with mature trees at the corner of St. Joseph and Bay – and they’ve succeeded.

A TORONTO TEACHER WRITES TO THE GLOBE ABOUT HER NERVOUSNESS RETURNING TO SCHOOL

LISA WOLFMAN’s letter to the Globe and Mail – ‘INSIDE THE BOX’ was to the point, and I read it at least three times. She wrote: “I am slated to be in a portable classroom with 26 students in a split class of grades 4 and 5. It will be impossible to put 26 desks at two metres apart. My board’s policy says that portable classroom doors are to remain locked at all times, and COVID-19 protocol is for fans to remain turned off to prevent possible spread.” <PS – THAT IS NOT Ms. Wolfman above.> “Imagine what it’s going to be like wearing a face mask for 300 minutes a day in these conditions. I cannot. If the Ontario government still feels it is unsafe for all Members of Parliament to return to Queen’s Park, how can it be safe for 26 children and one teacher to be confined to such a small space.” – Lisa Wolfman, Toronto, Globe and Mail, August 22/2020

THE INHABITANT OF A CABBAGETOWN HOUSE, 226-228 CARLTON ST., HAD A FULL LIFE WITH A BAD ENDING

I walk by this Second Empire style building almost every day. Built in 1879 it was the home of Dr. Rowena Hume, who was born in 1877 – the youngest of 12 children. Dr. Hume became the founder of Women’s College Hospital (one of Toronto’s finest) in 1911. In 1932 she opened the first Birth Control Clinic in Canada, in Hamilton, Ontario. She also ran a private practice in TORONTO after retiring. Dr. Hume was also involved in the Salvation Army, Alcoholics Anonymous, and the Fred Victor Mission. All went well until October 2, 1966, when Dr. Hume was murdered inside the house. From The Parliament News, by way of @historicbuildingsToronto; contributed by Maryam.  Photo – Women’s College Hospital Archves