SINCE 1951 CANADA LIFE’S WEATHER BEACON HAS BEEN PART OF TORONTO’S SKYLINE

<PHOTO – Richard Lautens/Toronto Star>  You know you’re in TORONTO when you see the beacon light atop the Stalinistic Canada Life Building on University Avenue. Forecast information is updated four times daily, seven days a week, thanks to Environment Canada.  What do the lights mean? Green (clear); Red (cloudy); Flashing Red (rain); Flashing White (snow). Lights on the tower struts – Up (warmer); Down (cooler); Steady (no change)More than 1,000 incandescent bulbs once illuminated the beacon, but these have now been replaced by energy-saving LEDs.The fifteen-storey Canada Life Building, University Avenue at Queen St. West, remains one of TORONTO’s largest office buildings.

Construction began in 1929 and the building made its debut in 1931. One special feature – its windows can be opened from the inside.< PHOTO BELOW – “Raising the last stone” 1930, City of Toronto Archives>

TORONTO & AREA’S WILDLIFE POPULATION IS INCREASING WITH THE CORONAVIRUS’S ARRIVAL

<The above photo has become an international hit – definitely in the Netherlands. Fox cubs are shown venturing out from their den under the boardwalk along Lake Ontario. Photo – Carlos Osorio/Reuters><Spotted in Northumberland County – a black bear; photo by Dave Thomson, Castleton><A coyote in the city. Photo – Dave @TuckerWasHere><A Canadian Beaver in Toronto’s High Park><And our every-day raccoons, squirrels, skunks, and numerous kinds of birds.>These days you can hear them singing well before the sun comes up.<ABOVE – editorial cartoon by BRIAN GABLE, Globe and Mail, Toronto>

‘BETWEEN THE EYES’ BY RICHARD DEACON, IS ON TORONTO’S WATERFRONT. YOU CAN’T MISS IT.

Richard Deacon, a London sculptor who does extraordinary things with extraordinary things.  There’s a huge Deacon sculpture in our city, near Lake Ontario, at the corner of Queen’s Quay East and Yonge Street.   Says Mr. Deacon: “I learned how to do technical drawing for public commissions like ‘Between the Eyes’, 1990 for Queen’s Quay in Toronto, but computing has changed all that.  Now you can make a model, scan it, and produce the sculpture in a factory.”