NOT SO LONG AGO, THE TWO GATEWAYS TO EXHIBITION PLACE WERE ARCHITECTURAL CHALLENGES

The first DUFFERIN GATE was built in 1895 <that’s it in the middle>. It became a meeting place for people preparing to enter the Canadian National Exhibition. But as the Fair was modernizing, the first low-rise gate was torn down in 1910 and replaced by architect G.W. GOUINLOCK’s grand structure, with single storied wings on either side of the entrance.Then in 1959 a new modern gateway took shape, with nearby railway, streetcar and bus stops.The new Gate was decorated with flags, lightbulbs and garlands, giving it “a theatrical look”, according to William Dendy in his book ‘Lost Toronto’. It was designed by ARTHUR KEITH, who’d been chief architect on Toronto Transit’s Yonge subway project.  It reminds me of a smaller version of the St. Louis Arch. <b/w photos by City of TORONTO Archives & Sidewalk Labs>Meanwhile, on the east side of the grounds, a spectacular new Princes’ Gate, dedicated to the Prince of Wales, took the place of honour as the main entrance to Exhibition Place and the C.N.E. <PHOTO BELOW by JACK LANDAU, UrbanToronto.ca >

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