RENTING A PLACE TO LIVE IN TORONTO ISN’T FOR THE FAINT OF HEART – SOME STATISTICS FROM ‘NOW’

$1,803
The average rent for a one-bedroom condo
Less than 1%
The current vacancy rate. A healthy rental market requires a rate of 3 to 5%
47%
TORONTO residents who spend more than 30% of their income on housing
47%
TORONTO households that are renters
120 days
Advance notice a landlord is required to give a tenant for renovations
1.8%
Provincial increase guideline for 2019
40,000
The number of affordable rental units Mayor John Tory promises to build in 12 years

TORONTO’S EDWARD BURTYNSKY SHOWS US EARTH’S INDUSTRIALIZATION & EXTRACTION ON A GRAND SCALE

ANTHROPOCENE is a collaboration among award-winning photographer Edward Burtynsky & filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier. <IMAGE ABOVE – Kevin Walsh/Earth Magazine.org>  The images make it clear what humankind has been up to for decades. They’re a wakeup call to the destruction caused by our species’ dominance, thus far anyway.<COAL MINE #1, North Rhine, Westphalia, GERMANY, 2015, © Edward Burtynsky, Flowers Gallery, London/Nicholas Metivier Gallery, TORONTO>. “I have always been concerned with showing how we affect the Earth in a big way. To this end, I seek out and photograph large-scale systems that leave lasting marks.” – from ‘Life in the Anthropocene’ by Edward Burtynsky<Elephant Tusk Burn, Nairobi National Park, Kenya, film still, Anthropocene Films Inc. © 2018>. “How to convey, despite our brevity as a species, the magnitude of our impact? Anthropocene in a scientific and geological sense means that we are now everywhere, all the time, and even in the rocks—those dense, mysterious receptacles of the planet’s history.” – from ‘Our Embedded Signal’ by Jennifer Baichwal.<Dandora Landfill #3, Plastics Recycling, Nairobi, Kenya 2016. © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier Gallery, TORONTO>. “It’s hard not to marvel at the engineering ingenuity of the massive industrial sites we filmed, and equally hard to ignore the devastation they represent.” – from the essay ‘Evidence’ by Nicholas de Pencier.<Uralkali Potash Mine #2, Berezniki, RUSSIA, 2017, © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy of Flowers Gallery, London/ Nicholas Metivier Gallery, TORONTO><Carrara Marble Quarries, Cava di Canalgrande #2, Carrara, Italy, 2016. Mural, © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy of the artist and Nicholas Metivier Gallery, TORONTO>The Art Gallery of Ontario-produced catalogue, Anthropocene, is available at shopAGO for $29.95; along with the 224-page Anthropocene art book published by Steidl.

THE AGO PLANS TO BUY CANADA’S FIRST PERMANENT YAYOI KUSAMA ‘INFINITY ROOM’ FOR $2,000,000

The AGO (Art Gallery of Ontario) has the first million in the bank, and is looking to crowdfund the second between now and December 1st.Why spend so much on one art installation? This past spring YAYOI KUSAMA’s touring exhibition was a hit, attracting 165,000 patrons, long lineups and unprecedented demand for tickets. Each visitor was allowed only 20 seconds to take in the mirrored rooms, then was moved on allowing others to have a peek.“KUSAMA transcends nationality. She’s more than just a Japanese artist, she’s a global one,” said STEPHAN JOST, director and CEO of the Art Gallery of Ontario. “My thought is, if this is successful, we should do (crowdfunding for) a Canadian artist as well.”  There are currently 18 museums around the world with Kusama rooms.The Toronto Star wonders if “TORONTO won’t be stuck with the artistic pop art equivalent of a Cabbage Patch Doll”.

In 1966 LUCAS SAMARAS unveiled ‘Room #2’, one of the earliest art installations that viewers could enter and experience mirrored infinity <PHOTO BELOW>. The original can be found about 85 miles from TORONTO in BUFFALO, New York. It’s in the permanent collection of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, and has always been on display whenever I visited.Everything old is new again.