TORONTO HAS SOME SPLENDID CHURCHES AND SYNAGOGUES NEAR THE DOWNTOWN CORE

Fresh from a multi-million dollar renovation, the 169-year-old St. Michael’s Cathedral Basilica, is the principal church of Canada’s largest English-speaking Catholic archdiocese.  It’s on Bond Street at Shuter.

St. George Greek Orthodox Church is also on Bond Street – at #115

St. James’ Anglican Cathedral occupies the corner of King Street East at Church.  Over the years this impressive building has been visited by Queen Elizabeth and other members of the Royal Family several times.

The Kiever Synagogue in Kensington Market

St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church, 130 Bathurst Street at Adelaide

The 154-year-old St. Anne’s is Canada’s only Byzantine Revival Anglican church. It’s patterned after ISTANBUL’s Hagia Sophia, and in 1998 was designated a National Historic Site.  St. Anne’s is further afield on Gladstone Avenue in the west end, and the interior was designed by members of the famous Group of Seven painters, and sculptors Frances Loring and Florence Wyle.

Above – the choir loft at St. Paul’s Roman Catholic Basilica on Power Street at Queen Street East

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ARON CHAPMAN LOVES BOTH LEGO & TORONTO’S CANADIAN-MADE BOMBARDIER SUBWAY TRAINS

ARON CHAPMAN is a train driver on the busy Yonge-University subway Line 1. He’s also fascinated by the world of LEGO and obsessed with his current goal to put Canada on the LEGO map. Subject matter – the TORONTO Transit Commissions new trains and the system itself.

“(There aren’t) any LEGO kits based on Canada,” he said. “There are all types of world LEGO – the Taj Mahal, the Eiffel Tower – but nothing on Canada, not even the CN Tower.”  After almost immediate approval by the TTC, ARON recently submitted his model to LEGO for production & retail consideration.

The build features 2910 bricks, 28 pieces of track, 2 TTC operator minifigures and hundreds of details that only an insider would know.  In order for the design to make it onto shelves, Aron needs 10,000 votes. You can support his project by casting a vote at http://www.totrain.ca<PHOTO – and here’s the real thing.>

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PARTNERS WITH INDIA’S TATA TRUSTS TO RESEARCH CITIES & ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Part of a School of Cities alliance in either MUMBAI or BENGALURU, the research and entrepreneur centres will open in 2019. University of TORONTO undergraduates, graduate students and faculty will have the opportunity to experience “real local engagement and activity” on site in India.  U of T’s priority these days is to increase global partnerships. The study of cities is part of an international project created by the Indian philanthropic organization TATA TRUSTS. It’s not the first time the University has worked with the charitable organization. This time the partnership will connect India’s “smart city” priorities with U of T’s “thought leadership” and its School of Cities.

<PHOTO ABOVE – University of TORONTO St. George Campus>

A CLOUDY DAWN OVER LAKE ONTARIO AS THE LEUTY LIFEGUARD STATION STANDS GUARD

A symbol of the Beach neighborhood, south of the boardwalk, the Leuty Lifeguard Station, built in 1920, is one of the few remaining buildings near the water’s edge.  Once there was an entire amusement park at nearby Scarborough Beach, along with private boat houses, canoes for hire, and some commercial buildings. Now, the lifeguard station stands alone at the bottom of Leuty Avenue, greeting a gray dawn.
<PHOTO – BRYAN BLENKIN>

ON “WEED WEDNESDAY” OCTOBER 17TH POT WAS LEGALIZED – AND THE ‘HORSE’ LEFT THE BARN

Prime Minister JUSTIN TRUDEAU promised to do this three years ago when he won a majority government. Today, his most notable campaign promise has been enacted. Newfoundland and Labrador started things off at 12:01 am (Newfoundland Time) and it spread from there through all seven time zones, east to west, north to south.  Finally, Donald Trump was kicked out of the headlines.

<THE RULES – OTTAWA Citizen>

<The National Post, TORONTO>

<“MERGING LEGALIZED POT adds danger to the roads”, by GRAEME MACKAY, Hamilton Spectator, HAMILTON, Ontario>

<“CLEANUP IN AISLE 17!” by BRIAN GABLE, Globe and Mail, October 17th.>

IT MAY LOOK LIKE A LOG CABIN, BUT THESE BLUEPRINTS ARE FOR AN EARLY TORONTO ‘COMFORT STATION’

These days one looks for a nearby Tim Hortons or Starbucks coffee emporium, but in those days city architects took pride and effort in designing public conveniences (a.k.a. lavatories, biffies, or comfort stations).

A few of these buildings still survive – some assigned other duties.
The architectural drawings and blueprints above are for a proposed lavatory in Runnymede Park, dated January 31, 1935. <City of TORONTO Archives>

IN 2018 THE TORONTO DANCE THEATRE CELEBRATES A HALF-CENTURY OF EXTRAORDINARY CREATIVITY

1968 – The founders Patricia Beatty, David Earle and Peter Randazzo. That year the company received an Ontario Arts Council grant of $1,250. They accepted it with gratitude and went on to build one of TORONTO’s leading cultural institutions.

<1976 – ‘National Spirit’, choreography by Danny Grossman; photographer unidentified>

<1990 – The Company in front of the Winchester Dance Theatre, 80 Winchester Street, Cabbagetown, a converted church owned by the Company, which still houses a performance space & the Toronto Dance Theatre School.>

<1991 – At the Joyce dance theatre in New York City where they’ve performed many times; opening night, November/1991>

<2005 – ‘In The Boneyard’ with ‘The Hidden Cameras’, choreography by Christopher House>

<2017 – ‘Mercury Dust’, choreography by Emily Law; photo Omer Yukseker>

In NOW Magazine – “50 Things To Know About the TORONTO DANCE THEATRE” by KATHLEEN SMITH. You’ll find the article at https://nowtoronto.com/culture/stage/50-things-to-know-about-toronto-dance-theatre/