THE SPADINA MUSEUM, 285 SPADINA ROAD, IS A VICTORIAN HOUSE IN AN EDWARDIAN GARDEN

The Spadina (Spa-dee-na) Museum, 285 Spadina (Spa-dye-na) Road, sits atop Davenport Hill. One of several museums operated by the City of TORONTO, the house was built in 1866. Its interior is furnished in styles from the 1860’s to the 1930’s.

Located near Casa Loma and the stables, the surrounding neighborhood contains some of TORONTO’s finest homes. Within easy walking distance – Nordheimer Ravine and its trails, Ardwold Gate, Winston Churchill Park and the St. Clair Reservoir.  A short drive or walk away – Forest Hill Village.

PHOTOS ABOVE by Roland Shainidze – http://www.ilovetoronto.com

The Museum is surrounded by immaculate Victorian and Edwardian gardens.  The Spadina Museum is open Tuesday to Friday, noon-4 pm; Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 pm.  Subway stop: DUPONT, and then walk northwest uphill, or ST. CLAIR subway stop, and then streetcar #512 westbound to Spadina Road, and walk south.

Advertisements

CHARITY THE COW HAS LEFT HER LOFTY PERCH IN CATHEDRALTOWN AND RETURNED TO DONOR

High above Charity Crescent in the suburb of Cathedraltown, came a sculpture called ‘Charity, Perpetuation of Perfection’. “The last thing that would cross my mind would be to raise a life-sized cow with chrome-like finish two storeys in the air and consider that proper,” said local resident Danny Dasilva. “I hate it.”

Donated by well-meaning developer HELEN ROMAN-BARBER, the statue honoured a prize-winning show cow that died in 1988. It was put there with the approval of city councillor ALAN HO – who faced the wrath of the populace.  Anyway, Charity has hit the road. She’s on her way back to Ms. Roman-Barber. Who says the suburbs are dull?

YOU HAVEN’T SEEN TORONTO IF YOU HAVEN’T BEEN TO CABBAGETOWN

This walkable neighbourhood contains one of North America’s largest collections of Victorian-era housing, two of our city’s oldest cemeteries, an animal farm, parks and gardens.

CABBAGETOWN is reachable by the eastbound #506 BUS (streetcars are temporarily off-line) from COLLEGE subway station to Parliament Street. Then walk east.

A LOOK AT OUR TOWN’S SOOTY INDUSTRIAL PAST – FROM THE CITY OF TORONTO ARCHIVES

<Weston streetcar, the Junction, 1906>

<St. Clair Avenue at Houslow Heath Road, 1924>

<Railway crossing, Strachan Avenue>

<The Maple Leaf Stockyards, Keele Street and St. Clair Avenue West>

<Runnymede bus stop and drinking fountain, Keele Street, 1929>

<Union Street at St. Clair Avenue, 1931>

<Laying streetcar tracks, Dundas West at Keele, 1923>

<Heading for Union Station, ca1940-50>