THE FEDERAL & PROVINCIAL GOV’TS ARE ABOUT TO INVEST HEAVILY IN TORONTO TRANSIT

<Ontario Infrastructure Minister Bob Chiarelli, (left), & Amarjeet Sohi, the federal Minister of Infrastructure & Communities; PHOTO – Carlos Osorio / Toronto Star>

<‘NEXT STOP: SOMEWHERE OVER THE RAINBOW’, editorial cartoon by BRIAN GABLE, Globe and Mail/Toronto/2017>. After years of pleading, finally the two senior governments have recognized the necessity of improving transit infrastructure in TORONTO. The city will get $4.89-billion from the federal government, and that will be matched with $4.04-billion from the province.  That’s about $9-billion altogether.  $9-billion won’t be enough to build everything on TORONTO’s wish list, but it’ll be a significant boost (covering about 75%) to priorities such as the Scarborough subway extension, Smart Track, the Line 2 subway relief connector, the Eglinton East LRT, and the Waterfront LRT.

<The light at the end of the tunnel – upcoming federal & provincial elections/2018 may have something to do with governmental largesse.  I wonder.>

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DON’T SWEAT THE SMALL STUFF – SWEAT DISCOVERING YOU’VE BEEN FIRED ON TWITTER

What a way to go – your career ends, you’re out the door, and there’s little recourse. It’s the latest phenomenon in politics and business. POTUS, the class bully, practices it with aplomb by using a spitball (tapping the SEND key). The technique is to catch the target off-guard (sitting on the toilet as in the case of one member of the president’s cabinet), and then hit them on the back or side of the head.

The Twitter President is a showman who sure knows how to work the medium. With a single tweet viewed by millions, and then amplified on news and social media, the victim’s dismissal goes worldwide. In seconds it’s over – but not for the fired ones who must piece their lives back together.

THE TORONTO DANCE THEATRE CELEBRATES 50 YEARS OF OUTSIDE-THE-BOX CREATIVITY

<1968 – The founders Patricia Beatty, David Earle and Peter Randazzo. That year the company received an Ontario Arts Council grant of $1,250.>.  Photos below from the Toronto Dance Theatre’s extensive archive. For more titles & the names of all the dancers and choreographers, plus the history of the company go to https://tdt.org/tdt50/

<1969 – Danny Grossman & Patricia Beatty in ‘Against Sleep’; choreography Patricia Beatty, photo by David Davis>

<1976 – ‘National Spirit’, choreography by Danny Grossman; photographer unidentified>

<1990 – The Company in front of the Winchester Dance Theatre, 80 Winchester, Cabbagetown, a converted church owned by the Company, which houses a performance space & the Toronto Dance Theatre School.>

<1991 – At the Joyce dance theatre in New York City where they’ve performed many times; opening night, November/1991>

<2003 – ‘Sly Verb’, choreography by Christopher House; photograph by David Hou>

<2005 – ‘In The Boneyard’ with ‘The Hidden Cameras’, choreography by Christopher House>

<2006 – ‘Timecode Break’, choreography by Christopher House; photograph by Aaron McKenzie Fraser>

<2009 – ‘Awareness Etudes for 6 Performers & an Audience’, from the Berlin/Toronto Project, choreography by Felix Marchand; photograph by David Hou>

<2017 – ‘Mercury Dust’, choreography by Emily Law; photo Omer Yukseker>

In NOW Magazine this week – “50 Things To Know About the TORONTO DANCE THEATRE” by KATHLEEN SMITH. You’ll find the article at https://nowtoronto.com/culture/stage/50-things-to-know-about-toronto-dance-theatre/

<The Toronto Dance Theatre Company in BOGOTA, Colombia, 2017>

CHICAGO’S JUSTUS ROE III WAS IN TOWN RECENTLY & LEFT BEHIND A RENEWED RONCY PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

<Muralist Justus Roe III with Mayor John Tory – before the project began.>. In a partnership with the STEPS Initiative, Chicago’s free-style muralist tackled the gray concrete Roncy Bridge. <Photo above – STEPS>

The Roncesvalles Pedestrian Bridge crosses the Gardiner Expressway in the west end. It’s always been somber-looking – but once Mr. Roe got through with it, everything had changed.

Justus didn’t have a design plan. “I freestyle it,” he says. “I find that I have better success when I don’t work off a sketch and I let the environment guide it.”  No niche was left unpainted.

The Roncesvalles Pedestrian Bridge crosses mainline railway tracks & the Gardiner Expressway at the foot of Roncesvalles Avenue.  It’s certainly worth a look.

ANCROFT PLACE IS LIKE AN ENGLISH COUNTRY VILLAGE THAT’S LANDED IN DOWNTOWN TORONTO

There’s something kind of British about these 21 red brick buildings situated on a leafy cul-de-sac, facing a deep ravine.

Houses in this community are similar to English cottages, but they’re not as small as they first appear.  They’re valued in the millions, partly because of the location.

Lawyer and developer KENNETH FERNS MACKENZIE finished building Ancroft Place in 1927, two years before the stock market crashed and the Great Depression began. His was one of the few rental complexes in or near ritzy ROSEDALE, that made it possible to rent without worrying about a mortgage, and still be in an upscale neighbourhood.  Ancroft Place is another of TORONTO’s ‘hidden’ communities.  When the trees sprout in the spring the houses almost disappear.