TORONTO’S WARTIME HOUSES HAVE BECOME UNAFFORDABLE IN A HOT REAL ESTATE MARKET

<NORTH YORK wartime housing, 1967>

Between 1941 and 1947 a crown corporation called Wartime Housing Limited built thousands of houses across Canada for war workers, veterans and their families. These Wartime Houses became some of Canada’s first suburban communities.

Wartime Houses are iconic architectural forms — a rectangle with a triangle on top. They were part of a government initiative to provide affordable rental homes to working class people.

<PHOTO ABOVE – NOW magazine>

There are three Wartime Housing sites in TORONTO. The houses are now privately owned, and many have been gentrified through additions and demolitions.

<PHOTO – National Film Board>

Artist MEAGHAN HYCKIE – “It does feel strange not to be able to afford a house in the East York neighbourhood of small, Second World War-era homes I grew up in.

“Does private home ownership and development result in a more livable city? Is a bigger house a better house? And what part should government play in suburban planning and building conservation?”

<PHOTO – Wartime Housing in Windsor, Ontario>

With that in mind, Ms. Hyckie has curated ‘A Reasonable Assurance of Permanency’ at TORONTO’s Urbanspace Gallery, 401 Richmond St. West, until January 6, 2018.

<Meaghan Hyckie is represented by the Olga Korper Gallery. A recent resident at the Banff Centre, her work is part of collections throughout Canada, the US and the UK.>

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