ARTIST DOUGLAS COUPLAND’S ICONIC ‘RED CANOE’ OVERLOOKS THE GARDINER EXPRESSWAY

The red canoe is positioned between CANOE LANDING PARK & the Gardiner Expressway.  It’s seen by thousands of motorists every day.

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REMEMBERING TORONTO GENERAL POST OFFICE & THE CITY’S 1ST BLACK LETTER CARRIER

The TORONTO GENERAL POST OFFICE stood where Toronto Street meets Adelaide from 1873, until the 1950‘s when it was demolished.

All that remains is Canada’s coat-of-arts removed from above the doorway, and a memorial plaque to one ALBERT JACKSON – in a Lombard Street parkette.

ALBERT JACKSON, born into slavery in Delaware in the 1850’s, became TORONTO’s first Black letter carrier and one of the few people of colour appointed a civil servant in 19th century Canada.

Jackson’s mother, Ann Maria, escaped from the United States to Canada via the Underground Railroad network after two of her sons were sold and her husband died of grief. Anna Maria and seven children arrived in TORONTO where Albert grew up and was educated.

Mr. Jackson was appointed a letter carrier on May 12, 1882. Racists within the post office refused to train him, but with some help from Prime Minister Sir John A. MacDonald and the Black community, he eventually delivered mail for over 30 years, and worked at the post office until his death in 1918.

TORONTO’S REFERENCE LIBRARY HAS ONE OF THE WORLD’S TOP ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE COLLECTIONS

Since 1884 four million rare items, art, manuscripts, books and artifacts have been gathered up by our city’s library system. Among them – materials devoted to the life and work of Arthur Conan Doyle <PHOTO BELOW>, best known for his portrayal of London’s famous detective SHERLOCK HOLMES and his sidekick DR. WATSON.

TORONTO Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street

IS TORONTO READY FOR ANOTHER RIDE ON THE DOUG FORD MERRY-GO-ROUND? PLEASE, NO-O-O-O-O!

The decision hasn’t been announced yet, but rumours are flying that DOUG FORD is going to take on JOHN TORY in the 2018 run for the mayor’s chair. We thought we’d seen the last of him politically. Apparently not.

Ford’s usual rants are about “the gravy train, taxes, taxes, taxes, suburbs vs downtown, the common folk, the elites, subways, subways, subways, and those horrible streetcars”. We’ve heard it all before and we’ll no doubt hear it all again – once the decision has been made official on Saturday, September 9.

FOR A QUICK WAY TO NAVIGATE TORONTO SAVVY’S 1350 POSTS – SEE BELOW

Culture, What’s On & Entertainment – https://torontosavvy.me/category/culture-whats-on-entertainment/

Architecture – https://torontosavvy.me/category/architecture/

Art & Design – https://torontosavvy.me/category/art-design/

Development – https://torontosavvy.me/category/development-2/

Other cities, towns, villages – https://torontosavvy.me/category/other-cities/

TORONTO Short Stories – https://torontosavvy.me/category/toronto-short-stories/

People – https://torontosavvy.me/category/people/

TORONTO & Area Transport – https://torontosavvy.me/category/transport/

TORONTO history & institutions – https://torontosavvy.me/category/history-institutions/

Parks & gardens – https://torontosavvy.me/category/parks-and-gardens/

Politics (federal, provincial, civic) – https://torontosavvy.me/category/politics/

TORONTO Neighbourhoods – https://torontosavvy.me/category/neighbourhoods/

Cityscapes – https://torontosavvy.me/category/cityscapes/

THE 6 TOWERS OF THE TORONTO-DOMINION BANK SYMBOLIZE THIS CITY’S BUSINESS LEADERSHIP

The first tower went up a half-century ago, transforming TORONTO’s skyline from low-rise to high-rise. Renowned architect MIES VAN DER ROHE’s design (‘less is more’) set a new standard for the financial district and introduced the modern workplace to Canada.

The TD Bank Tower & the TD North Tower in the early 1970s. <photo – Cadillac Fairview>

Today there are six towers (5 are black), owned by Cadillac Fairview and the Ontario Pension Board. Over 20,000 people work in the complex, which includes a public plaza, Joe Fafard’s cow sculptures, a living green roof atop the banking pavilion, and 70 tenants.  Since 2009, the buildings have been undergoing a $250-million revitalization.

The TD Centre meticulously maintains the appearance of the iconic complex. <photo above – Tom Arban>

Today, the financial district’s skyline has grown up around the TD Centre.