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‘BIKE SHARE TORONTO’ ADDS 70 NEW STATIONS & CITY ADDS 3-PERSON BIKE LANE PATROL SQUAD

TORONTO’s Bike Share system is expanding. 70 new pickup and drop-off stations will soon appear near subway and streetcar stops, boosting the total to 270. The system recorded its highest-ever daily ridership – 6,490 – on June 21 and has now grown to 9,500 active members.

The new stations will allow Bike Share to reach the Scarborough and Etobicoke boundaries, but there’s still a long way to go. “I believe that the program represents part of the answer to the transit unfriendly development of yesteryear,” said Mayor JOHN TORY

The days of nonchalantly parking in bike lanes may be coming to an end thanks to TORONTO’s Police Service. Three Bike Lane Enforcement officers are now on the road, handing out $150 tickets for lane blockers.  The cycling community, which is growing rapidly, has been complaining for some time about parked vehicles forcing cyclists into busy streets. Officer Erin Urquhart hopes to educate drivers “that pulling over for a coffee really isn’t worth $150.”

OLD AND YOUNG SEEM TO AGREE – KENSINGTON MARKET IS ONE “COOL” NEIGHBOURHOOD

It’s a National Historic Site and the locals fight hard to keep it that way. There are no big box stores here. The multicultural neighbourhood occupies a large tract of land from College Street to the north, Spadina on the east, Dundas on the south and Bathurst Street to the west.

The area is filled with food stores of every kind, a variety of upscale & downscale restaurants, nightclubs, coffee bars, vintage clothing shops, two synagogues, and re-jigged architecture of every description. Bellevue Park (now undergoing a complete renovation) is, without a doubt, TORONTO’s finest place to people watch.

Kensington’s long history as an immigrant working-class neighbourhood is changing into a more expensive place to live and do business. Don’t let the facades fool you. The Market’s shops and houses aren’t cheap to come by.