DANIELS CORP., BUILDERS OF REGENT PARK, UNVEILS ‘CITY OF ARTS’ PROJECT FOR EASTERN WATERFRONT

LIGHTHOUSE2 A 1.3-million sq. ft. ‘City of the Arts’ will soon rise on TORONTO’s eastern waterfront. Developed by Daniels Corporation, the company that’s transforming Regent Park into a new community, the project is to be built in two phases. The south phase, nearest the lake, will include office space in two buildings, retail space at ground level, and a 150,000-square-foot Creative Industries Hub that will house a cluster of arts organizations.

LIGHTHOUSE1Non-profit (and very active) arts development organization Artscape is moving into the complex, along with a talent management firm, an entertainment law firm, Manifesto (whose programs empower disadvantaged youth through arts and culture), and the Remix Project (a non-profit organization working with youth in the creative sector). Daniels Corporation plans to relocate here as well.

LIGHTHOUSE3The second phase will consist of 900 apartment suites within two towers. One, named the Lighthouse Tower, will rise 48 storeys above the harbour. Sales will begin in the fall.

‘TORONTO THE GOOD’ AT NIGHT BY ROOFTOPPER & URBAN EXPLORER OSCAR FLORES

OSCAR FLORES is a TORONTO-based photographer, urban explorer and rooftopper. You can see much more of his work on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Flickr and Instagram – https://twitter.com/416shots & http://416shots.tumblr.com/

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FOUND UNDER A PARKING LOT, KING RICHARD III IS LAID TO REST IN LEICESTER CATHEDRAL

RICHARD5 As the song goes, “we’ll all be lying equal in the grave”.  This was proven true when the University of Leicester unearthed the skeleton of King Richard III in 2012.  The last Plantagenet king of England had been lying under a parking lot for about 500 years. His remains were buried today, March 26, in Leicester Cathedral.

RICHARD1RICHARD3TORONTO is an old hand at digging up carparks and finding skeletons under them.  No kings, but at least 11 skeletons (PHOTO BELOW) were found buried beneath the Don Jail carpark in 2007.  Evidence shows they were prisoners sent to the gallows in the late 19th century.  The old Don Jail, which opened in 1864, was the scene of more than 24 executions before the death penalty was abolished in 1976.

carpark3Below the asphalt of St. James Cathedral’s parking lot were several unmarked graves, and beneath the schoolyard of St. Paul’s Catholic School (adjacent to the Basilica of St. Paul’s) is an unmarked graveyard of victims of the Great Irish Famine.

WE’RE LOSING AN 1889 COACH HOUSE, BUT GAINING A 50,000 SQ. FT. HIV/AIDS HEALTH CARE FACILITY

CASEY6 CASEY HOUSE, corner of Huntley and Isabella Streets, was the first institution specializing in HIV/AIDS care in Canada. Founded in 1988, the hospital is named after Casey Frayne (who died young in a motorcycle accident).

CASEY4His mother, the late journalist June Callwood, recognized a serious need and worked tirelessly to get Casey House off the ground.

CASEY5To better cope with this ongoing disease, Casey House is now in the process of building a new, award-winning, health care centre. Scheduled to open in 2016, the centre will allow a doubling of its care capacity, and the introduction of a new Day Health Program, providing one-stop care and treatment from first infection to end-of-life care.

CASEY2CASEY7Unfortunately there isn’t enough room on the property for this beautiful old coach house <PHOTOS ABOVE>.  It’s being demolished.  Fortunately the 1875 William R. Johnston mansion <PHOTO BELOW> fronting on Jarvis Street is being restored, and will be folded into the new hospital centre.

CASEY3CASEY8<GROUNDBREAKING for the new hospital, Monday, March 30/2015>