The Patio House: an architectural optical illusion in the Nortown District

PATIOHOUSE2© BorXu Design

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GUY JONES TAKES US TO PARIS IN THE Belle Époque-era, AT NORMAL SPEED & WITH SOUND

GUY JONES is a videographer who brings history to life by editing old films and making them more watchable. He slows them down to a natural speed and adds sound – making them a totally new viewing experience.  This one is a collection of high quality remastered prints from the dawn of film taken in Belle Époque-era Paris, 1896-1900, by the Lumière company —–    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjDclfAFRB4&feature=youtu.be

THE ‘GERRARD INDIA BAZAAR’ IS TORONTO’S SOUTH ASIAN CONNECTION

It may not be the most glamourous neighbourhood in town, but it is unique. The Gerrard India Bazaar is one of the largest marketing centres for South Asian goods and services in North America.  Here you’ll find over 100 shops, jewellery outlets and restaurants between Greenwood and Coxwell Avenues along Gerrard Street East. The Bazaar is the best place for earrings, bangles, saris, Bollywood music and videos, a couple of art galleries, vegetarian restaurants, an Islamic bookstore, gold and fashions from Dubai, India, Pakistan and Singapore.  The eastbound #506 Carlton streetcar passes through the Bazaar.

Academy Award-winning actor, WALTER HUSTON, slept here: 328 Wellesley Street East

WALTERHUSTON1   WALTERHUSTON2WALTER HUSTON, Toronto-born, began his academic career at WINCHESTER PUBLIC SCHOOL on Winchester Street east of Parliament.  After attending the Shaw School of Acting, he made his Broadway debut in 1924.  When talking pictures began, Huston set off for HOLLYWOOD, playing both leading man and character roles in countless films.  Among them – ‘The Virginian’, ‘Treasure of the Sierra Madre’ and D.W. Griffith’s ‘Abraham Lincoln’  WALTER HUSTON won both the Golden Globe and an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in ‘Sierra Madre’.  All of his grandchildren became actors, as well as his great-grandson.  He was the father of actor and director,  JOHN HUSTON, whose daughter is actor ANGELICA HUSTON.  Plaque locations: Winchester Public School and 328 Wellesley Street East in CABBAGETOWN.

PATRICK CUMMINS’ CAMERA RECORDS OUR STREETS, HOUSES, GARAGES & STOREFRONTS

“Full Frontal T.O.” from Coach House Press is a straight forward chronicle of TORONTO streetscapes by archivist PATRICK CUMMINS. Winner of the 2013 Heritage Toronto Award of Excellence, the book shows us how our city looks, lives and changes over time, block by block, facade by facade. Among other bookshops it’s now available at the Art Gallery of Ontario for about $25.  “Full Frontal T.O.” features over 400 photos of TORONTO’s messy urbanism, with accompanying text by urban explorer SHAWN MCALLEF.  Check out the super “Full Frontal T.O.” blogsite – http://www.fullfrontalto.wordpress.com  PATRICK CUMMINS: “The lives that are lived in these buildings change and mold them to their shape. We try to control this, but these things are just happening.”

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140 BOULTON AVE. (NOW DEMOLISHED) PHOTOGRAPHED AS IT AGED, BY PATRICK CUMMINS

BOULTON1SHAWN MICALLEF, “Full Frontal T.O.”: “The building at 140 Boulton Avenue is a perfectly Torontonian kind of building. It’s the TORONTO we know intimately because we walk by this house, and its analogues, all over the city, every day, but rarely pay them any attention; they really aren’t very pretty.  There 140 Boulton sits, squat, ramshackle and dishevelled – like somebody who’s been sleeping in the same clothes for days – on the corner by busy Dundas Street.  Few pay it any mind: it’s just one of the thousands of nondescript buildings that make up the wallpaper of our city. Across the street is the Boulton Parkette. It’s also the kind of parkette we like to keep here in TORONTO: its dishevelledness matches number 140, with bits of trash blowing around, a rusting iron fence, a worn-out lawn and some uneven interlocking brick.  We don’t do the Tuileries in TORONTO; Paris can have that kind of finicky formal park space our city seems to say, but we don’t have time for such frivolity.”PATRICK CUMMINS has photographed aspects of Toronto’s built environment since 1978. He has worked as an archivist with the City of Toronto since 1986, specializing in photographic, cartographic and architectural records. He has had work featured in several acclaimed photo exhibitions.

THE ‘TINY TOWN’ HOUSES OF CRAVEN ROAD. NOT JUST A STREET – IT’S A NEIGHBOURHOOD.

CRAVENROAD1         Off the beaten track in the east end of TORONTO, Craven Road is in a little world all its own. Running from Queen Street East to Danforth Avenue the street, once called Eerie Terrace, was carved from the wide backyards of neighbouring homes. After a dispute over property boundaries, the city bought the land, laid the asphalt, and built the longest municipally maintained wooden fence in town. Some of the locals use the fence as an art gallery.

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Facing the fence are several blocks of tiny, detached houses – many built by the homeowners themselves.

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“As Toronto continues to be surrounded by more and more condo buildings, it is fun being reminded that somewhere near these gigantic high-rise buildings lives a world of little spaces. Craven Road and the Tiny House Society have managed to prove that a few hundred square feet is more than enough space to live comfortably — even among rooms full of history.”Spacing Magazine  . . . . . CRAVEN ROAD is reachable by the Queen Street East and Dundas East streetcar lines. The subway stop is COXWELL.