BAY STREET #1 – ‘baby pictures’ of Canada’s Financial Capital/1904-1945

PHOTOS – City of Toronto Archives

BAYST4BAYST3BAYST5BAYST8BAYST7

Advertisements

BAY STREET #2 – south from City Hall – Canada’s financial capital

Walking in a southerly direction from City Hall, you enter Canada’s Wall Street.  This is the land of banks, finance companies, the TSX – Canada’s largest stock exchange, the Design Centre, the PATH underground shopping tunnels, light filled plazas, some of our city’s finest restaurants, bars and hotels, business clubs, deco architecture and the ferry docks.

Like Wall Street, it’s a fun area to explore, especially on weekends when the streets are quiet.

TORONTO HAS 2 ‘GHOST’ SUBWAY STATIONS. BAY LOWER IS ONE OF THEM.

There are at least two of them.  One is under Queen Street West, built in anticipation of a Queen Subway.  The other lies beneath the intersection of Bay Street and Bloor West.  The Toronto Transit Commission calls it BAY LOWER.  Opened in 1966, the platforms were used for only six months as part of a subway Y-interchange plan – which didn’t work.  Now it’s used for storage, or rented out to movie companies.

PHOTOS – http://www.uerev.com

BAY STREET #3 – north from City Hall to YORKVILLE & beyond

Bay Street is short by TORONTO standards.  It runs from the Ferry Docks north to Davenport Road.  The southern section is Canada’s Wall Street – banks, the stock exchange, hotels, clubs, etc.  But north of City Hall things change, and Bay becomes a mishmash of architectural and life styles, passing through some old and colourful neighbourhoods.  Bay is an excellent place for a long stroll.

PHOTOS BELOW – the Toronto Labyrinth, Church of the Holy Trinity, Trinity Square; Victorian architecture and restaurants on Elm Street; Ontario Government complex and John B. Aird Art Gallery; St. Basil’s Catholic Church; Elm Street restaurants; and Pusateri’s at Yorkville Avenue and Bay.