A LANDMARK – THE GALLERIA, 181 BAY STREET – ARCHITECT: SANTIAGO CALATRAVA

<PHOTOS ABOVE – Holiday time at the Galleria>

The Galleria, 181 Bay Street, Financial District, connects Bay with Yonge Street.  Architect – Santiago Calatrava.  The “hall of light” is five storeys high and runs parallel to Front Street.  One floor below is a connection to the Hockey Hall of Fame.  First class art and cultural events are often presented here.  For large commercial developments, the City requires that 1% of the budget be devoted to ‘public art’. This has resulted in some rather horrific sculptures decorating plazas of little use. But in this case, the architects proposed the Galleria itself as public art. Happily, the City agreed and the result is (one of) Toronto’s finest indoor public spaces. Not to be missed!

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TORONTO’S SUBWAY SYSTEM – IS CLEAN, EFFICIENT AND RELIABLE (FOR THE MOST PART)

If you’re a tourist, TORONTO’s underground will serve you well.  There are about 70 stations altogether, and we’re now building six more plus a massive lightrail network in the suburbs.  The subway is open from roughly 6 am until 2 am Monday to Saturday, and on Sundays from 9 am until 2 am.  Avoid the rush hour.  It’s wicked.  <PHOTO – a Line 2 delay, Bloor and Yonge station>PROS
– rush hour trains run every minute or two; off-peak, every 3-5 minutes
– all cars are air-conditioned
– stops are announced clearly
– the system has an anti-graffiti policy; you’ll never see any in the cars; seldom in the stations
– most of TORONTO’s major tourist attractions are on the subway or nearby
– single fares are about $3, but there are Day Passes ($11.50 per adult weekdays; $11.50 for 2 adults on weekends) and Family Passes (up to 4 children, on weekends and holidays).  There are also reduced fares for students and seniors.
– transfers are free, and allow you to ride the subway and transfer to buses and streetcars
– you can get to Pearson International Airport by subway (Kipling station, and then an airport bus) for one fare
– there’s a window in the front of some trains.  Kids love that.

CONS
– a few of the stations are ugly, ugly, ugly
– stations are always being fixed up or rebuilt or something
– escalators seem to be continually out of service.  A green indicator on station platforms will tell you if an escalator is functioning.  Elevators are also available in most stations.
– the trains will squeal and screech, as steel wheels hit steel rails.  Kids love that.