TORONTO SAYS IT WILL NOT ALLOW HOMELESS ENCAMPMENTS TO REMAIN IN PUBLIC PARKS

The reasons: concerns of public accessibility, legality and safety. “The shelter system is unsafe, demeaning and overcrowded” according to the Shelter and Housing Justice Network. People cannot be forced to move to indoor shelters, so the City issues a notice of trespassing to those living in homeless encampments, and offers help from city services, including referrals to indoor shelters. Toronto plans to spend about $663-million on homelessness and Housing First services this year, and has opened more than 25 physical distancing shelters to house those coming from encampments. < From The Bridge News, November 2021, by Megan Camlasaran,>

THIS PHOTO TAKES ME BACK TO THE 1950’ S AS A DAYTIME RADIO BROADCASTER IN NOVA SCOTIA

I’m being rather self-centered here, but I came across this picture of me doing ‘The Malt Shop’, on-air weekday afternoons after school, 4:00 to 5:00 pm on CKDH, Amherst, N.S.  Music discs were lined up on the right near the reel-to-reel tape machine, and there I was, high school student, hosting the show and running the equipment. Since then Toronto has been very good to me in television. Couldn’t have asked for anything more.

A FUN EXPERIENCE OF BIG CITIES IS APPROACHING ONE VIA AIR AT NIGHT – TORONTO FOR INSTANCE.

Often times I’ve had quite a tour of Canada’s largest city as the jet first passes over small towns and villages, then the vast city of Mississauga, and finally the outskirts of Toronto. Often the pilot will travel East along Ontario’s Capital, then make a Left turn and head back West again towards Pearson International Airport. Brakes are applied as the jet thunders along the runway and proceeds to the Airport Apron and the Parking Stands. Then check-ins and Big T.O. (our Toronto) awaits.

F.Y.I. – A LONG TIME AGO LOS ANGELES ATTRACTED ME AND IT STILL DOES – A FEW FACTS BELOW.

This morning, while reading, I found a lengthy story on The Big Orange. It says “Los Angeles County holds 10-million people; contains 80 cities; about 3 times the population of Connecticut; is spread out over 4,000-plus square miles; <Photo  – City of Los Angeles, population of the City alone is 3,983,540> ; more cars than people overall; and there’s a whole lot more.

THEY MAY NOT ALL BE OPEN YET, BUT HERE’S A LIST OF SOME THEATRES & CONCERT HALLS IN TORONTO

LARGE THEATRES
*Berkeley Street Theatre, 26 Berkeley Street, http://www.canadianstage.com
*Bluma Appel Theatre, 27 Front Street East, http://www.canadianstage.com
*CAA (formerly Panasonic) Theatre, 651 Yonge St., http://www.mirvish.com
*Elgin Theatre, 189 Yonge Street, http://www.ticketmaster.ca
*Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay W., http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com/venues/fleckdancetheatre/
*Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts (Opera House), 145 Queen St. W., http://www.coc.ca
*Princess of Wales Theatre, 300 King St. W., http://www.mirvish.com
*Royal Alexandra Theatre, 260 King St. W., http://www.mirvish.com
*Streetcar Crow’s Theatre, 345 Carlaw Av., http://www.crowstheatre.com
*St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts, 27 Front St. E., http://www.stlc.com
*Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge St., http://www.tocentre.com
*Winter Garden Theatre, 189 Yonge Street, http://www.ticketmaster.ca
MORE THEATRES
*Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley Street, http://www.alumnaetheatre.com
*Bad Dog Comedy Theatre, 875 Bloor Street West, http://www.baddogtheatre.com
*Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, 12 Alexander St., http://www.buddiesinbadtimes.com
*Cahoots Theatre Company, staging diversity, 388 Queen St. E., http://www.cahoots.ca
*Coal Mine Theatre, 1454 Danforth Av., http://www.coalminetheatre.com
*Factory Theatre, 125 Bathurst Street, http://www.factorytheatre.ca
*Hart House Theatre, 7 Hart House Circle, University of Toronto, http://harthouse.ca/hart-house-theatre/
*MacMillan Theatre, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto, http://www.music.utoronto.ca
*National Ballet of Canada, Four Seasons Centre, 145 Queen Street West, https://national.ballet.ca
*Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Lane, Brampton, Ontario, http://www.brampton.ca/sites/rose-theatre/en/Pages/Welcome.aspx
*Second City, sketch comedy theatre that’s launched many careers, 51 Mercer Street, http://www.secondcity.com
*Storefront Theatre, 955 Bloor Street West, pushes creative boundaries, an original, http://www.thestorefronttheatre.com
*Tarragon Theatre, 30 Bridgman Ave., http://www.tarragontheatre.com
*Theatre Centre, 1115 Queen St. W., http://www.theatrecentre.org
*Theatre Passe Muraille, 16 Ryerson Avenue, http://www.passemuraille.on.ca
*Toronto Dance Theatre, 80 Winchester St., Cabbagetown, http://www.tdt.org
*Yuk Yuk’s Comedy Club, 224 Richmond St. West, https://www.yukyuks.com/toronto
CONCERT HALLS
*Danforth Music Hall, 147 Danforth Av., http://www.thedanforth.com
*George Weston Recital Hall, 5040 Yonge Street, http://www.tocentre.com/theatres/george-weston-recital-hall
*Glenn Gould Studio, CBC Broadcasting Centre, 250 Front St. W., http://www.cbc.ca/glenngould
*Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay West, http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com
*Hugh’s Room, 2261 Dundas St. W., http://www.hughsroom.com
*Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor Street West, http://www.rcmusic.com
*Massey Hall, 178 Victoria Street, just renovated, http://www.masseyhall.com
*Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe Street, http://www.roythomson.com
*Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. W., http://www.trinitystpauls.ca

A 66-STOREY FUTURISTIC LOOKING TOWER IS PROPOSED FOR 55 YONGE STREET, DOWNTOWN TORONTO

The tower will combine office, retail and residential space. Designed by BDP Quadrangle and Partisans, with a futuristic-looking white and glass facade, several curves and a sloping peak. Inside there’ll be 16,700 square metres of offices, 1,300 square metres of retail space and 483 residential units. A pool, pool lounge, event space, multiple terraces, a gym, yoga room and study lounge will be included. Conveniently the building will be established a one minute walk from the King Street subway station and five minutes from Union Station.  <Renderings by H&R REIT>

TORONTO’S FILM BUSINESS IS GOING UP – WAY UP – SOON SUPPORTING EVEN MORE SCREEN INDUSTRY

< Artist rendering above, BMH, Basin Media Hub>From VARIETY – Toronto, Canada’s metropolis, home to 1.9-million, known for feature film production, celebrated series, and opening Canadian headquarters this year by Netflix. There’s more coming. Hackman Capital Partners (HCP) and its affiliate, the MBS Group, have won the request to build a major new $250-million studio complex in Toronto. It will provide  up to 500,000 square feet of film, television and digital media studio space and production offices, including eight purpose-built sound stages as well as workshop and production support spaces. HCP-MBS will also work with the city to create a public promenade along the waterfront. City Councillor Paula Fletcher, chair of the Film, TV & Digital Media Advisory Board said “With production value in Toronto on track to hit a 2022 record high, surpassing the 2019 record high of $2.2 billion, this industry needs the state-of-the-art media hub to meet the growing demand for space and Toronto talent.” The HCP-MBS proposal was approved by CreateTO, Toronto’s real estate agency, last month and city council last week, before Mayor John Tory announced the finalization of the partnership. Mayor Tory said “The HCP-MBS proposal is a tremendous opportunity for the city and “an exciting addition to Toronto’s east end.”

TORONTO’S OFFICIAL FLAG WAS DESIGNED IN 1974 BY 21-YEAR-OLD STUDENT, RENATO DE SANTIS

Renato De Santis, a graphic design student at George Brown College , won a 1974 competition among 670 entries, held by the City of Toronto Flag Design Committee.  A variation of this flag is used by Toronto Fire Services’ fireboat ‘William Lyon Mackenzie’. Mackenzie was a Scottish-born Canadian-American journalist and politician, who founded newspapers critical of elite members of Upper Canada, known as The Family Compact. He aligned with Reformers and represented York County in the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada.

The flag <BELOW> displays the twin towers of City Hall on a blue background, with Canada’s red maple leaf from the national flag at its base.