THE DEATH OF QUEEN ELIZABETH II, OCCURRED LAST THURSDAY MORNING – AND CANADA’S PRIME MINISTER, JUSTIN TRUDEAU, SPENT TIME WITH HER. CANADA’S THOUGHTS ARE VERY MUCH WITH THE QUEEN.

From – The British Heritage – As the world’s longest-reigning Monarch, there’s an entire generation of people who have never known life without her. But what will actually happen when Queen Elizabeth II  leaves us? What protocol will be followed when Her Majesty passes on?  Word has been spreading all across Canada – including  Ottawa.  Shown in the photograph below,  the 96-year-old British Monarch, is holding hands with Canada’s Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau.  They’ve been together often, and do have good times.

IF YOU’RE INTO ART, WITHIN TORONTO’S ‘REGENT PARK’ THERE WILL BE A NEW, NEAT PLACE TO GO.

I’ve been waiting for some time, hopefully getting A TASTE OF TORONTO’S REGENT PARK, and finally my way (or some of it anyway) is almost nearly here. I spent yesterday afternoon walking around FINE ART wherever it happened to be. I understand we were pointed toward a skillful place to enjoy – An “Art Festival” in Regent Park. And that’s what it’s becoming to be. From The Presentation Sponsor came these words – “Love Where You Live”. –  And below are several examples of what you might find – Best of Luck with that!

 

PSM (PARLIAMENT STREET NEWS) HAS SPOTLIGHTED THE SINCLAIR FAMILY – KNOWN FOR ONE KIND OF SPOT OR ANOTHER. BEST IN THEIR TIMES.

Thanks to the sons I’ve learned a lot. Well-known Gordon Sinclair, thanks to CFRB and CBC, born in 1906, sired a Scot from Inverness and an Anglo from Kent. He spent time walking in neighbourhoods, building houses and breeding horses in stables.  Houses in those days slowed their ages. Their work – class families of humble means – loud and colourful. Convenience stores took places. All walked to family-run businesses to buy from family-run businesses. On Sackville Street empty taxis parked, pigeons and demolished apartment buildings, night shifts. Ghosts of families were everywhere. Big surprise was walking into a used book store in Coldwater, Ontario and discovering two books written by locals – We speak of authour broadcaster Gordon Sinclair and novelist Hugh Garner . . .  . . . .  Gordon shared his prose with dirty streets of Cabbagetown and/or Riverdale. Gordon’s  birth was on Carlton Street in 1900.  Sounds of the area connected with his youth. He recalled the roar of a lion (not this one) housing from the Toronto Zoo across the street. The sound reached as high as Amelia Street. Then came ‘Cabbagetown’ by Hugh Garner set on familiar streets. That  story began before The Great Depression up to the 1970’s. That brought in working class, hotbed multiculturalism, a variety of sins, old houses, prosperity still years away, encounters with 51 Division, newly arrived restauranteurs, squalid rooming houses. These are the books that tell, or once told, the real story. Forget the history text books sitting on shelves in school libraries. Not always, though. <Contributed by Duncan Fremlin – local Realtor and Musician>

I HAVE DONE MORE TRAVELING FOR MY BLOG – “torontosavvy” – AND THERE’S NOTHING I LIKE BETTER.

Last night we stopped at a Bank and then next door went to the movies to take in “Downton Abbey – A New Era”. This showing took place in the lovely, Kingsway Movie Theatre, which shows black & white, classic reels, foreign films, docs and occasional blockbusters. This feature was a great winner. However without not too much of an audience, but we were there. Toronto’s transit system does well, and our Presto Card allowed us to take a train from Sumach St., then cross town to St. George’s. subway station, and from there an ascent to the cinema itself. No extra charge for either of us; then we had a walk back to the subway for the next train (lots of big noise); got on board; crossed town; and eventually got back home. Line #2 is quite an exciting train. It reminds me of a noisy New York City train roaring through tunnels. Toronto is building even more subway lines right now. On our list for Downtown Halifax itself there are condos and apartment rentals and one spectacular building. There’s The famous Town Clock. There’s The  Halifax Public Garden, and . . . .  . . . . .  “Friday Night Lights.” This afternoon the two of us were waiting for Seafoods from Clearwater in Halifax, to be delivered from Clearwater Seafoods and transported to us from Halifax International Airport itself. What’s available to order? – There’s Lobster, Scallops, Shrimp, Crab and . . . more quality Seafood from Salmon to Tuna, Black Cod, Halibut and all the rest.  <Below – a high-rise of Halifax Harbour>

ACTION HAS BROKEN OUT AT CTV TELEVISION NEWS – AND LISA LAFLAMME IS NOW GOING FOR HER ORDERLY “NEWS ANCHOR” STAKE.

There’s more . . .  to the story for sure. CTV News Executive, Michael Melling is going on leave. He wants to spend more time with his family. Decided on this after Lisa’s controversy made an appearance. Last week The Globe and Mail revealed that shortly after Mr. Melling took the role of CTV News Head, and asked questions about who approved “to let Lisa’s hair grow grey?”, according to a senior CTV official, present at a meeting. In a statement sent to The Globe on Friday, Mr. Melling said this was “categorically untrue.” The Globe also reported on tensions between Mr. Melling and Ms. LaFlamme over newsroom priorities, story coverage, and resources. News broke that Ms. LaFlamme was leaving the show she had helmed for more than a decade nearly two weeks ago. In the days that followed, the story spiralled into a national outrage.
Brands such as Dove and Wendy’s introduced ad campaigns in support of women going ‘grey’. In this case, Ms. LaFlamme had earned praise from women across Canada when she decided to stop dyeing her hair early in the pandemic. Mr. Melling and Ms. Moses, held a joint town hall meeting. A day later the company planned an independent third-party review. Staff raised concerns about the review. Journalists within the CTV Newsroom sent a letter to Bell Canada chief executive MirKo Bibic, Bell’s board of directors, and Wade Oosterman, president of Bell Media, expressing a lack of confidence in Mr. Melling’s leadership. He concluded “We have no confidence in Mr. Melling’s ability to lead the news division.”  In May, 2019, as general manager of CP24 and CTV News Toronto, Mr. Melling announced “Project Innovation.” Partly through this initiative, he developed a reputation internally as “The Cutter.”  Will Ms. LaFlamme return? She would be welcome

SOON WE’LL BE VISITING NOVA SCOTIA AND HEADING FOR THE CAPITOL – ALSO KNOWN AS HALIFAX, A CITY GROWING RAPIDLY AS A MULTI-CULTURAL HUB.

National flag of Nova Scotia. Vector illustration, Vector of Nova Scotia flag.

There appear to be gaps among Air-Canada travelers who want, or need to fly. Each of us have our own needs. The latest census data shows. The visible minority population in Halifax is growing at a rapid rate. Between 2011 and 2016, The Black population of Halifax grew by 10%, and the population of other visible minorities grew by a massive 42% over the same period.  My Nova Scotia family of 17 is on the way to our province’s Capitol, fairly close to Canada’s Ocean Playground.<ABOVE – Lonely Planet — The Town Clock> The City also has between 1,000 and 7,000 people with Italian, Polish, Lebanese, Chinese, African, East Indian, American, Norwegian, Spanish, Jewish, and Greek ethnicities, among others.  <ABOVE – Halifax Public Transit, Copyright, Stock Photos<><ABOVE – Halifax International Airport – – – – STANFIELD>

THERE’S THE PILOT TAVERN IN DOWNTOWN TORONTO – AND WE STILL HAVE IT!

The Pilot was born “The Pilot Grill” in 1944 at its original location 800 Yonge Street, just north of Bloor. The name of the bar was a tip of the cap to the heroic RCAF flyers of World War II. During the Yonge Street era, The Pilot was a clubhouse, meeting place and sacred temple for artists, musicians and writers. This iconic restaurant made its mark in Bloor-Yorkville for nearly 75 years with its Flight Deck rooftop, eclectic menu, and live jazz nights. Back in the day artists, writers & musicians hung out at the spot. During the Yonge Street era, The Pilot was a clubhouse, and meeting place for artists, musicians and writers.
The restaurant has been around the city streets of Toronto since it opened in 1944 at its original location on Yonge Street. It’s a catchy clever name The Pilot, and was a tribute to those who fought in World War II. After the war, it became a favourite hang-out for local artists, and the bar remained popular through Yorkville’s transition to a hippie community. It was in 1972 that the Pilot moved to its present location – 22 Cumberland Street, in the heart of Yorkville. According to legend, some of the Pilot’s regular customers carried the original bar to the new location. 
<<BELOW – a new version of The Pilot>.     In 1987, the current owners took possession of the popular spot, and have kept it true to its original charm. They introduced to the “Flight Deck”, one of the largest rooftop patios Toronto has to offer. They have also introduced the “Stealth Lounge”, a more sophisticated party space, that can be rented out for parties ranging in size from 30 to 130 people. The Stealth Lounge offers its’ own bar, complete with comfy lounge seating. The food selection is average, but the food itself is quite good. I have never personally had any problems with food or service. And for being in one of the trendiest neighbourhoods in TORONTO, it is very unpretentious.